Sony FS5: Smart, cunning and divisive over media…

Sony FS5: Smart, cunning and divisive over media…

I recently got a sneak preview of Sony’s new PXW-FS5. The IBC noise sounded a bit like this was an FS100 replacement (it isn’t). It’s actually much closer to the FS7.

It doesn’t quite have the same 4K clout as the FS7, but it’s got a couple of really smart, discreet upgrades in tech and design, all in a much smaller form factor, allowing shooting from any angle. Sony have produced an amazing small form factor, large sensor 4K camera. Now you’re going to want one of each.

So the sexy specs – 14 stops, QFHD 4K, over-cranking, WiFi/near field communication, choice of two codecs (including XAVC).

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The body

As you can see from the pics, the FS7 closely resembles the FS7. From the tech specs, you can see this thing is half the size. Also, it’s designed to be modular, so you strip it down to just a functioning body (weighing just 830g!) and a lens. What Sony have done with the XLRs on the FS5 is my first favourite ‘smartness’ – they’ve put them in completely different places. One is in the handle where you’d always expect it, the other is in the body. This enables recording XLR audio without anything else attached.

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The LCD will rotate into any position on its axis, then there are loads of mounting screws, so it can be mounted in almost any position.

Another smartness – the handgrip. I love the physics-defying design of the rotating arm on the FS7. On the 5, it looks like they’ve taken the handgrip from the 7 and attached it direct – it will rotate 180 degrees and also lock into nine specific places within that arc It’s so good in terms of weight, balance and ergonomics.

The battery

The FS5 ships with a BPU-30 battery, but the camera has a really deep battery-bay –its designed so a BPU-60 will fit flush with the body and a BPU-90 will extrude just a bit. Incidentally a BPU-60 will run it for approx. 4.5 hours, so a great choice on the FS5.

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The best bit

Time for another smartness – and my favourite bit – the ND filter. I kid you not. Firstly, as you can see from my pics, the silver ND dial looks the same, and is in the same position as on the FS7. But it’s brand new technology. It’s not mechanical (or not entirely); it’s digitally controlled. So as you switch the ND filter on, a clear piece of glass is mechanically dropped over the sensor (see pic), but the amount that the glass is tinted (ND-ed) is done digitally. Anywhere from 1/4 ND through to 1/28. To make it simple, that silver dial (which is normally three positions of ND) is still that, but what you want each position to be is set in the Menus – so the silver dial is like three ‘assignable’ buttons for ND.

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The controversial bit

The next bit you’re either going to love or hate.

For choice of media, Sony have gone for good ol’ non-proprietary SDXC cards. Awesome – you’ll save a fortune on media. And I’m still impressed at the engineering that makes 4K acquisition onto an SDXC card possible. However, there’s a trade-off – bottom line is you can only get 100MB/s as a consistent write speed from most fast SDXC cards, so the FS5 can only shoot UHD 4K up to 100MB/s.

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The footage I saw looked stunning (funny, demo reels always do…), but the trade-off is it can only shoot 4K to SDXC as a Long GOP profile – no Intraframe, which is reserved for the FS7 with its fancy, faster (and much more expensive) XQD cards. If you’re a shooter who moans about the cost of the newer, faster media (whether XQD, C-Fast, AJA PAK…), be careful what you wish for.

Over-cranking

Which brings me onto over-cranking. Yep, the FS5 can shoot up to 240fps at full HD. I know, I know, you’re doing the maths and shouting ‘but that’s impossible if the capture media can only do a reliable 100MB/s!’ Yep. Which is why it can only do it in eight second bursts (like the FS700).

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The FS5 captures it to an internal buffer first, then adds it to media. Another trade-off for cheaper media. Furthermore, there’s no over-cranking at QFHD 4K (unhappy face). However, drop it to 120 fps at 1080, and this buffer becomes a sixteen second burst. And if you’re a real slo-mo freak, it will continue to shoot lower, for every drop in resolution you’re prepared to go –as far as up to 960fps at 260p (260 lines, or ¼ vertical HD resolution), or so I believe.

The boring bit

Resolution – the FS5 will shoot full HD at 4:2:2, 10-bit, at 50p at 50Mb/s or 10-bit 4:2:2 at 25p at 35Mb/s. And if you really want, you can even shoot AVCHD at 24Mb/s and lower. It will even shoot DCI 2K at this 10-bit 4:2:2 profile. Sony’s final trade-off with the SDXC choice – the FS5 will only shoot UHD 4K internally at 8-bit 4:2:0. It will do it in S-Log 2 and 3, but take into account the fact that it’s only 8-bit.

The verdict

A good time to take a good look at yourself and ask – do you prefer affordable media with limitations on shooting, or insanely expensive media (XQD, C-FAST, AJA-PAKs etc) that allows you to do everything? Luckily for Sony, they now have two answers to cover themselves: FS5 or FS7.

Another cunning trick, this surprise announcement really lays down the gauntlet on the (announced a while back) eagerly awaited URSA Mini. Now, wouldn’t it be really cunning if they released a firmware update for RAW…

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Sony offering super savings on cameras for classrooms!

Sony offering super savings on cameras for classrooms!

Want to teach students the professional production skills they’ll need in their future careers (and attract prospective students)? Now’s the time to update your camera kit, as Sony are currently offering education institutions up to £1079* off cameras, including the PXW-X70 and FS7. It’s only on until 30th September though, so it’s a great excuse to dig into that budget!

The promotion covers a wide range of Sony’s professional cameras, from pro handheld up to film cameras. We’ve picked out our top cameras for education below, but if there are any other models that have caught your eye, or you need advice on what camera to plump for for a particular course or scenario, do get in touch with the team – as Sony Professional Solution Specialists, we’re here to help!

What’s on offer?

PXW-X70 – Great for all creative courses

Sony PXW-X70 on Jigsaw24

This 4K-ready camera was the first on the market to combine the dual benefits of a large sensor with a fixed lens, enabling incredibly shallow depth of field, with a real broadcast-quality workflow. A price tag of around £1500 means this camcorder is a professional and practical choice which isn’t going to break the bank. £1475 ex VAT (Save £216* with the Sony promo!)

PXW-X200 – Great for journalism courses

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A bit of a step up, the X200 features three 1/2-inch type Full-HD ExmorT CMOS sensors to achieve high resolution, high sensitivity, low noise, and wide dynamic range, 17x Fujinon professional HD zoom, and support for the most popular video formats, shooting to SxX cards or even inexpensive XQD, SDXC and SDHC cards via an adaptor. £3915 ex VAT (Save £432* with the Sony promo!)

PXW-FS7 and PMW-FS7K – Great for film courses

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Sony’s FS7 is a complete large sensor camera system that delivers long-form recording capabilities with 4K resolution in a compact, hand-held (and robust) design that makes it great for giving a cinematic sheen to students’ production. £4830 ex VAT (Save £288* with the Sony promo!)

PMW-F55 – Great for high-end production courses

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The F55 has a Super 35 4K CMOS sensor, global shutter technology that means far fewer artefacts, a wide colour gamut, and internal 4K recording to SxS Pro + cards at up to 60fps and 2K/HD at up 180fps. You can also simultaneously record XAVC 4K files and HD MPEG files to the same SxS Pro + card, for both backup and getting ready for grading.

We recently kitted out Staffordshire University with an F55, and Richard Mortimer, Media Centre Technical Team Leader, has been very impressed: “Now we’ve got mind-blowing technology we can put in front of students, things that they’re not going to see until they’ve been in industry a while and gotten their feet under the table.”

£17,500 ex VAT (Save £1079* with the Sony promo!)

– You can see the full range of Sony cameras here.

How does it work?

The promotion is only available to recognised public or private schools, colleges and universities providing full-time study. For that reason, we don’t apply the savings to the products on the website – you’ll need to get in touch with the team to put an order in, then we can apply your discount. Just remember, you only have until the 30th September 2015!

Want to know more about Sony cameras? Get in touch with us on 03332 409 306 or education@Jigsaw24.com to find out more. For all the latest news and updates follow  @Jigsaw24Edu on Twitter or ‘Like’ our Jigsaw24 Education Facebook page.

*Savings are adjusted for exchange rates at time of publishing, and so are subject to change.

 

NewTek NDI: What’s on the way?

NewTek NDI: What’s on the way?

NewTek’s NDI standard for video over IP was one of the big talking points at this year’s NAB Show, with NewTek releasing their own apps and tools alongside some corkers from third party vendors. In case you missed the kerfuffle (we can’t all get to Vegas on expenses, after all) here’s what we know about the key releases.

NewTek’s own apps

NewTek have obviously been hard at work on making their hardware range IP-compatible, and models running the latest firmware should cheerfully support the NDI protocol (give us a call if you’re not sure whether yours qualifies). They’ve also put together an SDK so that third parties can start producing plug-ins and apps. But they’ve also chosen to lead by example and put out a couple of apps of their own.

NewTek Telestrator is NewTek’s own moving image annotation app (and not, as the marketing team thought for one beautiful moment, anything to do with Fender guitars), allowing you to annotate stills and video to your heart’s content. Perfect for post-match analysis, training, and that bit of Strictly that they currently make Zoë Ball do on an interactive whiteboard.

NewTek Transit is an app that allows you to replace the customer-grade pictures you get from the likes of Skype, Google Hangout and various video conferencing apps with a crisp, professional quality NDI signal. If you have a compatible streaming encoder (or other third party production software with a webcam option), Transit will make any NDI video connection on your network appear as a ready-to-use webcam input, regardless of whether it actually is a webcam.

Third party apps

The first big third party announcement to roll out was that Sienna, whose production software pedigree is as long as it is impressive, had used NewTek’s SDK to produce NDI Source and a series of related apps for Mac users. This cunning suite of applications allows you to use NDI, which is a PC-based standard, on Apple computers and devices, and also brings key hardware from Blackmagic Design and AJA into the NDI fold. Once your device is running the correct version of NDI Source, you can connect SDI and HDMI sources to your AJA or BMD video interface and convert them to an NDI IP feed.

Adobe have also been quick to get in on the act, releasing their NDI for Adobe Creative Cloud app (or NDIFACC, as we choose to call it) over the course of NAB. This plug-in is available on a subscription basis from the NewTek store, and will allow you to display full res Premiere Pro and After Effects files on any screen connected to your video IP network.

“NDI for Adobe Creative Cloud transforms the workflows for Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC users by making creative elements visible on virtually any screen or any output on their local area network in full resolution,” said Michael Kornet, Executive Vice President of Business Development for NewTek, when the app was first announced. “The creative efficiencies plus time and cost savings to be gained is tremendous and represents a breakthrough across the board in all traditional pre-, live-, and post-production workflows. We are so excited to see how Adobe Creative Cloud customers will utilise the NDI integration to achieve things in ways that until now were unimaginable.”

Storage

GB Labs became the first company to announce NDI-friendly hardware (although a slew of IP-enabled hardware is in the pipeline, ranging from cameras to convertors). Their Space storage range integrates seamlessly with NewTek NDI solutions, and just so happens to be the world’s fastest NAS, capable of pulling data from multiple sources at 9000MBps. So really well worth a look even if you couldn’t give two hoots about NDI (our professional opinion is that you should give several hoots about NDI, for the record).

Want to try these out?

We’ve got a full TriCaster 8000 IP demo system, complete with NewTek’s core apps, ready and raring to go. We even have our very own NewTek Certified Trainer to talk you through it. If you’d like to book a demo or take the unit for a test drive, just get in touch on the details below.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

How to get the most from your Blackmagic Design URSA

How to get the most from your Blackmagic Design URSA

Blackmagic’s behemoth is a fantastic collaborative camera that gives the illusion that you’re working with £20,000 kit despite costing £3186 ex VAT. But if you really want to get the most out of it, there are a few things you need to know. Our camera specialist James Graham offers these top tips…

Know how you’re going to use it

“It’s not news that this is a pretty heavy camera, and it’s in no way a run and gun model – even if the test footage below shows that it’s a lot easier to manoeuvre than you might think, it’s still a big setup camera that suits itself to multiple operators, three of whom can even have their own high res LCD display.

The Bear in NZ Winter” – Beta URSA Footage from A Couple Of Night Owls on Vimeo.

As you can also see from the video, which was made using an unreleased beta version of the camera, the footage looks fantastic and has only improved in the final model. You are getting great image quality and a lot of flexibility for a pretty remarkable price, which actually makes the URSA a good shout for universities who want to get groups of students round a camera, shooting professional quality footage. It’s also a good reserve camera for anyone who frequently find themselves having to rent out high-end kit but wants to have something slightly more affordable to hand in case of emergency.”

Remember that an URSA is for life, not just for Christmas

As RedShark pointed out in their review, part of the reason that the URSA is built like a brick house it that it’s protecting a huge amount of “internal processing grunt” is that it arrives ready to accommodate a long future of upgrades and developments. If you’re not content with shooting ProRes and 4K RAW at 80fps, all you have to do is wait for a firmware upgrade – the camera will survive anything you can throw at it in the meantime. And the removable sensor block means that when better chip technology comes along, it’s literally a case of swapping out your existing chip and carrying on, because the rest of your camera will still be solid as a rock.”

Embrace the top audio quality

“The URSA comes with two XLR inputs with switchable phantom power and mic preamps. Really very good preamps. If you need convincing, listen to this hands-on review by the videographers at Faymus Media, which uses in-camera voice recording and somehow manages to capture audible dialogue in the middle of New York.”

Don’t lose the allen key

“Literally everything you want to add to or take off your URSA needs this key. Tape it to your body. Mould duplicates. Wear it on a chain. But do not – do not – put it down and then forget where you left it. Blackmagic won’t be happy with you.”

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Imagine release new 2.5 update to PreRoll Post archiving app

Imagine release new 2.5 update to PreRoll Post archiving app

Great news for editors who like to take the hard work out of their archiving process – Imagine have just released a new update to their celebrated LTFS archiving application PreRoll Post, with new features including an improved database design, optimisitaion for Sony’s Optical Disc Archive and more.

What’s PreRoll Post?

PreRoll Post is an LTFS archiving application aimed at simplifying the archiving process, creating proxies, thumbs and metadata while backing up to multiple locations at once. With handy schedule and notification features, users can set it to get to work, then sit back and relax. Being non-proprietary software, it works with all LTO tape drives or Sony’s Optical Disc Archive. Don’t just take our word for it though – FCP and Adobe trainer, and all-round video production supremo Larry Jordan has long sang its praises too.

So what’s new in PreRoll Post 2.5?

Imagine say they’ve been listening to customer feedback to make PreRoll Post even better, and in the new version 2.5 update they’ve added new features to make your archiving process even easier. These include:

– Updated database design to support large data sets like RAW archives.

– Optimised for Sony’s Optical Disc Archive.

– Updated Discovery Channel compliance to 2.2.0 specs.

– Faster and easier retrieval, right-click options on tapes and drives.

– Support for Unitex’s USB3 LTO drive.

Where can I get it?

This one’s easy. You can buy Imagine’s PreRoll Post as an electronic software download from us, for £300 ex VAT. Just click the banner below.

Want to know more about PreRoll Post? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

AVID | ISIS qualified for NewTek TriCaster and 3Play

AVID | ISIS qualified for NewTek TriCaster and 3Play

Avid’s ISIS | 5500 is the leading collaborative storage for a wide range of post-production and broadcast workflows, and is now qualified for live production with TriCaster and 3Play 4800. Using ISIS | 5500 as the recording drive for live sessions enables media to be immediately available to a variety of devices simultaneously including editors, transcoders and playout.

TriCaster 8000

Now, as an Avid Elite Partner for storage and a NewTek partner with one of the UK’s few certified trainers on staff, we’re obligated to get incredibly excited by news from either of these two, but according to Avid’s official press statement (and the aforementioned TriCaster trainer), this is legitimately awesome for anyone looking to record large-scale live broadcasts. Here are the official details of the test:

Avid ISIS | 5500 was tested with single and mirrored TriCaster 8000s. The mirrored configuration opens up a number of new workflows providing higher scale and redundancy for multi-screen productions. ISIS | 5500 enables the mirrored TriCasters to playback the same streams simultaneously. 3Play 4800 is NewTek’s leading integrated sports production solution, adding ISIS collaborative storage enables more creative workflows to deliver a more compelling experience for broadcasters, pro leagues and venues.

The combination of ISIS | 5500 and the NewTek portfolio allows up to eight streams to be recorded and simultaneously, play two streams and receive two channels of graphics simultaneously, with the added benefit of being able to instantaneously share and monetise your content. Gigabit Ethernet provides high speed, reliable connectivity between NewTek and ISIS. Qualified products include ISIS | 5500 and ISIS | 7500 and the NewTek TriCaster 8000, 860, 460, 410. Simply install the ISIS client on NewTek TriCaster Pro or 3Play and configure it to login and mount the required ISIS workspaces.

ISIS | 5500 is the leading collaborative media storage choice for facilities and workgroups. ISIS | 5500 scales in increments of 16, 32 or 64TB of capacity and delivers multiple GBs per second of throughput. The ISIS File System includes a number of patented mechanisms to provide predictable, reliable performance to multiple simultaneous connections. Predictable multi-stream performance as delivered by ISIS | 5500 is especially important in these live-to-air and fast turnaround workflows.

Avid ISIS | 5500 is now qualified through the NewTek Developer Network. Avid ISIS | 5500 and NewTek TriCaster and 3Play are available now.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Want to improve your video workflow? Here’s how Sony can help…

Want to improve your video workflow? Here’s how Sony can help…

If you’re shooting video on your DSLR, you’ll have realised you can only shoot in short bursts and have probably encountered the infamous rolling shutter ‘jelly effect’. Know what we’re talking about? This is because DSLRs aren’t optimised for video. So if you’re looking to step up from DSLR to a dedicated video camera, you need to think about your overall design workflow and end goals. Here are a few pointers and ways in which Sony can help.

Sony are one of the industry leaders, so getting to grips with their tech can be a real benefit and open your design workflow up to a whole host of cameras and peripherals to chose from. Here are a few things we recommend you bare in mind when considering your camera selection.

What kind of projects does your business produce?

Those of you that work on film will want a large sensor camera so that you’re able to master shooting with a ‘filmic’ shallow depth of field, whereas if your work is geared more towards general media production, you’ll want a smaller sensor camera that allows for longer focus, so that you can practice reactive shooting as events unfold.

Distinctions like this will also impact your choice of lens – variable if your goal is to create something attractive, fixed if you’re trying to shoot a news segment – and the kind of rigs, tripods and lights you need.

Studio v location shooting

If you’re design workflow focuses more on media and television production, you’re far more likely to need a dedicated room or studio where you can record, carry out chromakeying and man the gallery.

In this is the case, you’ll need cameras that can be linked together in a traditional studio setup. And if you’re using something like NewTek TriCaster to mix or stream footage, that will in turn affect the kinds of inputs and outputs you need on your cameras.

The good news is that most cameras can be modified to fit into a setup like this, but it’s important to make sure you have compatible cameras so that there’s not a noticeable difference between footage from A and B cameras, and that you don’t have to waste valuable time juggling file types and media formats.

What will you be doing with the footage after it’s shot (and how much storage do you have)?

Having a dedicated space for media work and basing your choice of camera around your streaming setup and infrastructure is a far better move than getting yourself cameras that look great but are difficult to network and integrate with the rest of your infrastructure. And of course if you’re going to be shuttling everything back and forth, you’ll want to go for as sturdy a camera as possible – no-one likes an unexpected repair bill.

When it comes to choosing a camera, it’s important to bear in mind that your choice can tie you into a specific workflow. Just because the camera you choose is budget conscious, doesn’t mean the files it records are. If you get a cheap camera that supports a very specific codec and workflow, you may well need to overhaul your storage and change key pieces of software, meaning the final cost will be greater than if you’d opted for a more expensive camera with a more flexible workflow and made use of your existing resources.

Another factor to consider is the sheer size of some files. If part of your daily design workflow includes shooting RAW footage, you need to be aware that you could be filling up a 64GB card every five minutes, so you’ll need a vast amount of (in some cases proprietary and expensive) media at your disposal. If post-production techniques like colour grading aren’t the focus of your business, it’s unlikely you really need to be working with such files at all, and we generally recommend sticking to something that’s kinder to your storage setup unless you’re looking to teach one specific hi-res workflow.

Our recommendations

With all that in mind, here are a few cameras we’d recommend for different workflows ranging from videography, promo films, live streaming and live reporting– if you’d like to find out more about any of them, you can always get in touch with our team at broadcast@Jigsaw24.com.

For corporate videography or advertising…

If you’re looking for a budget camera that still delivers on image quality and really don’t want to leave DSLRs behind, opt for a DSLR like Sony’s A7S. Affordable, equipped with a full frame sensor for shallow depth of field and able to record 4K to an external recorder if that’s what you really need, it’s a great option if you’ll be shooting in less than ideal conditions.

The PXW-FS7 is another strong option. Rammed with pro features and designed to be Sony’s most ergonomic camera to date, it’s ideal for trips out into the wild for more long form projects.

For live streaming from events or product videos…

Most cameras can be modified to fit into a studio setup, and with the latest additions to the TriCaster range you can stream from pretty much any camera with a pro SDI output, so do talk to us if you think you can’t afford studio cameras. That said, this is an area where your end goal can affect your camera choice and, by extension, the infrastructure you base your studio on – putting a low quality camera at the front of a high-end workflow will stop you getting the most out of your investment, and conversely buying expensive cameras without the backend to support them will stop you getting the best possible image quality.

The key thing here is to make sure you’re talking to your supplier about the workflow as a whole, so that you’re getting something that’s particular to the needs of your on design workflow and employees. If you’d like a couple of extreme examples to start you off, the PXW-X70 is increasingly popular as it allows you to adopt a real broadcast-quality workflow on a manageable budget, while the HXC-D70 was designed specifically to bring high-end technology to smaller studio setups, making it the perfect choice for smaller creative agencies. However, you’ll be able to find cameras at virtually every price and feature point between the two, so do ask us for options!

For live reporting from events or event videography…

The PXW-X70 is also a safe bet for the kind of run-and-gun shooting needed for electronic news gathering, while the HXR-MC2500 is an updated version of the MC2000 that gives you a 14 hour recording time to inexpensive media.

If you’re looking for top industry-spec tech, we’d recommend looking at the the EBU-approved PXW-X160 and PXW-X180. As well as letting you record broadcast quality footage, these cameras shoot XAVC, a professional Sony codec that’s widely supported.

To frantically reiterate, we’ve just outlined a few options here, and many cameras can be adapted to the needs of individual businesses and design workflows. To find out more about your options, get in touch with the team on the details below.

Want some advice about updating your setup? Give our consultants a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

 


Throw out your audio cables with Sony’s new multi interface shoe

Throw out your audio cables with Sony’s new multi interface shoe

Using a Sony camera or thinking of replacing your current setup? Don’t forget you can use Sony’s new P3 multi interface shoe to replace your audio cables with crisp, wireless in-camera recording…

The succinctly-named SMAD-P3 multi interface shoe adaptor works with Sony’s UWP-D wireless microphone series, allow you to mount a receiver on-camera and record audio directly into the camera without the need for any cables whatsoever.

Why do we like this idea? Well for one, it means fewer points of interference, so there’s less chance of your audio signal degrading or downright failing to get where you need it – always a plus.

Secondly, it means you have fewer things to forget, and we’re all about not carrying an extra cable. And actually the whole thing is powered through the camera, so you can forget the cost (and weight) of extra batteries, too.

Thirdly, it’s an official Sony adaptor, meaning it’s been tested extensively with not only the UWP-D mics, but with Sony’s latest NX and PX cameras, plus the MC2500. Sony are saying that you should see no change in functionality or loss of quality between your current audio setup and the SMAD-P3/UPW-D combo using any of that kit, which makes it a smart buy if your workflow is Sony-centric.

And if you do need to use an external recorder, there’s an output for that on the UWP-D, so you can always be recording two copies if you need to.

How much does it cost? 

The P3 multi interface shoe adaptor will set you back a mere £28 ex VAT, while the UWP-D series of receivers starts from just £225 ex VAT, meaning it’s comparable to Sennheiser units with similar specs, but more qualified for working with Sony.

Want to know more about wireless audio? Call us on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Canon 5D MkIII gets clean 8-bit HDMI out in new firmware update

Canon 5D MkIII gets clean 8-bit HDMI out in new firmware update


Yep, that’s right: Canon are finally accepting the fact that the still and video camera markets are slowly merging, and will add clean HDMI output to the 5D MkIII in a firmware update. Due in April, the update will also bring improved AF functionality, and there’s even 25p support coming to the 1D-C.

Canon EOS 5D MKIII and Atomos Ninja

 

“When shooting video, HDMI Output makes possible the recording of high-definition uncompressed video data (YCbCr 4:2:2, 8 bit) from the EOS 5D MkIII to an external recorder via the camera’s HDMI terminal,” Canon’s press team inform us. “This, in turn, facilitates the editing of video data with minimal image degradation for greater onsite workflow efficiency during motion picture and video productions. Additionally, video being captured can be displayed on an external monitor, enabling real-time, on-site monitoring of high-definition video during shooting.”

All of which we think is pretty awesome. “It’s good to see the 5D return to the top of the pile,” says James Graham, our camera expert and resident 5D enthusiast. “The 5D handles high ISO shooting far better than the Nikon D800 and, although I haven’t got the chance to try out the Sony A99 yet, the 5D has the better sensor.”

AF to work up to f/8
Leading us further down the dark road that ends with cameras becoming sentient robots whose operators exist purely to give them the occasional light dusting, Canon are also enabling autofocus up to f/8. “Even when the EOS 5D MkIII is equipped with an extender and lens making possible a maximum aperture of f/8, the firmware update supports AF employing the camera’s central cross-type points (currently compatible with maximum apertures up to f/5.6). Accordingly, the update will allow users to take advantage of AF when shooting distant subjects, benefitting sports and nature photographers, particularly when using telephoto lenses.”

25p (and possibly 8K) for the EOS-1DC

Also due in an April firmware update is 25p support for the 4K-capable EOS 1D-C, meaning you’ll be able to use it to shoot content at the UK broadcast standard. Huzzah! There are also rumours that Canon plan to use the 1D-C’s super fast buffer to allow you to record short bursts of 8K footage. Admittedly, not many filmmakers will be interested in shooting six seconds of 8K, but if you’re using the 1D-C primarily as a stills camera, having the flexibility to capture those incredibly detailed video clips will be fantastic. Here’s hoping Canon confirm soon…

Want to know more about Canon 5D MkIII or 1D-C? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. To keep up with all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook. 

 

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JVC GY-HM600 and GY-HM650 get EBU seal of approval

JVC GY-HM600 and GY-HM650 get EBU seal of approval

The EBU have awarded douze points to the JVC GY-HM600 and GY-HM650, with both cameras being approved for broadcast journalism use within the European Broadcasting Union, a network of 75 national broadcasters from Europe and affiliated states (think of the Eurovision lineup and you’re just about there).

Canon GY-HM600

The cameras are approved for journalistic work (Tier 2J) as is, and can be used for general HD long form work (Tier 2L) if you use an external recorder to get up to the 50MBps mark.

Gustav Emrich, European Product Manager for JVC Professional said:  “We are delighted that the GY-HM600 series has easily met the EBU standard requirements for broadcast use. We are pleased with the reports for these cameras, which were designed to be innovative new tools for mobile news gathering in challenging situations. JVC believe that the 600 series cameras are a big step forward for both us and our customers in terms of ease of use and versatility, as well as features and functions, and EBU approval is a validation of this.”

For once, we’re with the press release on this. The 600 series and bloomin’ amazing, and we reckon that if you whack an Atomos Ninja on the back they’d get you through pretty much any shoot. If you’re after a bit of light reading, you can read the report for the JVC GY-HM600 here or read the report for the GY-HM650 here, but the bottom line is that the EBU shares our excellent taste.

Want to know more about the JVC GY-HM600 and GY-HM650? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. To keep up with all the latest news, reviews and more, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook