Telestream Episode 6.4 is here!

Telestream Episode 6.4 is here!

Telestream have just announced the arrival of Episode 6.4 – a free update to Episode, Episode Pro and Episode Engine v6 encoding solutions. The goal for this latest release? To make it easier for you to integrate Episode Engine into your workflow and handle high volume workflows.

Episode v6.4: the highlights

This latest update is optimised for higher volume workflows, so anyone who’s thinking of upgrading to Pro or Engine from their current Episode setup should definitely give it a look. It adds support for .SCC and H.264 web captions, allowing you to insert closed caption data into MPEG3 and H.264 video streams – you can also add CLAP data to .MOV outputs. A new video rotate filter adds more filters to your inbox, allowing your to rotate source footage 90 degrees or 180 degrees, and flip it horizontally or vertically.

Workflow-wise, the most pleasant addition is the fact that you can now recreate sub-folders scanned via a monitor within the deployment root folder, and automatically mirror folder structures. There are also 20 levels of priority in Episode 6.4 versus three in Episode v6.3, while your workflow history, workflow displays, maximum bandwidth control and API performance have all been given a bit of a spruce.

Take a look at the full Episode 6.4 release notes here

Download Telestream Episode 6.4

Want to know more about the latest Telestream releases? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email For all the latest news and reviews, follow@Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

What are Softron up to now?

What are Softron up to now?

After a heck of an IBC showing, Softron are up to their knees in updates, new releases and intriguing theories about what you should be doing with your Mac Pro. We thought we’d do you all a favour and round up all the news into a single, easily digestible blog post. Go on, make yourself a cuppa, kick back and scroll down…

Multicam Logger

Showcased at IBC 2012, Multicam Logger does pretty much what it says on the tin. It logs which inputs are being used when in a live multi-camera production and uses the log to create a multi-cam clip that can then be polished in post before it’s broadcast or put online for on-demand consumption.

Although it’s designed primarily for use with Blackmagic Design’s ATEM range of production switchers, Multicam Logger can be paired with Softron’s GPICommand2 and then hooked up to your existing switcher. The resultant multi-cam clips will work in FCP X, Final Cut Pro 7 and Adobe Premiere Pro.

On the Air Studio

OnTheAir Studio is Softron’s Retina Display-ready radio streaming solution. It allows you to share your radio content directly with SHOUTcast or Icecast streaming services.

With a built-in Multiband Compressor, the ability to schedule 24/7 unattended playout, support for standard keyboards or MIDI controllers and the ability to change the volume on tracks, playlists or outputs without an external audio mixer, OnTheAirStudio offers a comprehensive set of features for anyone who wants to begin streaming their own radio content. It’ll even auto-generate ‘mix points’ when the volume of your output dips below a certain level, ensuring there’s never any silence as you switch between tracks.

Thunderbolt expansion chassis

At IBC, the Softron stand played host to an old favurite of ours, the Sonnet xMac mini Server, which they used to play four streams of HD from a Mac mini (with a bit of help from a Decklink Quad). For the uninitiated, the xMac mini server turns your Mac mini into a 1U rackmount server solution, complete with expansion slots, allowing you to use Thunderbolt-aware cards from AJA, Blackmagic Design, Matrox and more with your Mac mini.

They were also quick to big up the Sonnet Echo Express Chassis which, according to their press team, is “the ideal solution for mobile configurations with a laptop. We did run tests with this chassis together with the latest MacBook Pro Retina and the results are pretty impressive. Here is what we could achieve:

• 4 HD output with OnTheAir Node and OnTheAir Video

• 3 HD input with MovieRecorder (on a laptop!! incredible!!)

• 2 HD output with OnTheAir Video Express. (Note that playing out multiple streams with OnTheAir Video Express is still not recommended as there is no buffering as there is with our playback engine, but we could see a major difference when using an SSD; files playing very quick.)”


Total cost per CPU


After a bit of a barney with another vendor about whether it was cheaper to use a Decklink Quad and a four input Mac Pro or use four Mac minis and give each channel a dedicated CPU, Softron have released this handy price comparison chart. Granted, it’s in dollars, but it should still help you work out a round guide to whether a four CPU or a single CPU is going to work out better for your budget (don’t forget to factor in support!)

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ our Facebook page.

NVIDIA’s 3D Vision glasses

NVIDIA’s 3D Vision glasses

We recently managed to get our hands on a couple of pairs of these glasses and the associated hardware to use in our demonstrations at BVE. Having wanted to see them for quite some time, I was excited about seeing them in action.

Seeing an image in 3D on the screen requires each one of your eyes to see a slightly different image, there are several different ways to achieve this. Most systems use passive glasses; these take the form of either the coloured anaglyph glasses (which require no special display technology) or clear polarised glasses (requiring a matching polarised display).

Regardless of the technology used, the theory is the same: the glasses and display work together to ensure that your left eye only sees the left image and your right eye only sees the right image. Your brain does the rest, fusing these two separate images into a 3D picture.

The NVIDIA glasses work on the same theory but achieve it in a slightly different way. They are based on active technology and are powered by a small battery. The glasses work wirelessly, although they are charged over USB. Each lens of the glasses contains a liquid crystal display similar to those used in old calculators and this display changes the lens from black to clear at a rate of 60 HZ (60 times a second). While this is happening, the display flicks from the left image to the right image at a rate of 120 HZ. This is synced with the glasses via an infra red emitter to ensure that when the left image is being shown the right eye is blanked out and vice versa.

To make all of this work, you will need the following equipment:

  • The NVIDIA 3D Vision starter kit, containing a pair of glasses and the infra red sync emitter.
  • A compatible NVIDIA graphics card with a DIN connector for the sync emitter. A Quadro is needed for pro applications such as Maya. A Geforce is needed for Games.
  • A display that is capable of displaying an image at 120HZ – the Samsung SyncMaster range is a good place to start.
  • Software that is capable of using active stereo. In games, this is taken care of by the Nvidia driver. With regard to pro apps, any app that supports Quad Buffered OpenGL will work.

So, enough of the technical stuff – what are these glasses like to use? I was lucky enough to test them extensively, using them both for gaming and within Autodesk’s Maya. I was very impressed with them, I had expected to see some flickering of the picture as it switched from the left to right images but, with each eye being displayed at nearly 3 times the frame rate required for smooth viewing, the picture was extremely smooth. The glasses do make the screen appear a little dimmer but this can be fixed easily by turning up the brightness a little.

The experience of getting the glasses to work with my professional applications was a smooth one also, and just required enabling stereoscopic support in the NVIDIA control panel. It is even possible to display 3D output from two different programs at the same time.

In summary, these glasses are ideal if you want to preview and edit stereoscopic content in programs like Maya, or view stereoscopic movies. Imagine being able to show your 3D film or game in full colour progressive 3D, or showing off your product or building designs to clients in full 3D. With most major modelling packages including 3ds Max Design, Maya, CINEMA 4D and others at least able to create stereoscopic content even if you can’t directly edit in 3D, these glasses offer a great way to show your work in an immersive way. Content can be exported from this software and played back using Nvidias stereoscopic player and you can even use them for a bit of gaming after work!

If you’re not sure about the best way to create or view stereoscopic content, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email