Trouble at the Old Mill IV: IT – Behind the scenes

Trouble at the Old Mill IV: IT – Behind the scenes

MacBook Pros have been disappearing all over Jigsaw24 HQ, and there are reports of a mysterious red balloon making its way around the office. Three intrepid team members headed down to the depths of the basement store room to take on the ghoulish clown causing all the trouble…

We had a blast filming the latest instalment of Trouble at the Old Mill, starring our very willing junior copywriter Joe as the titular clown. Aside from a rubber mask, some face paint and a bright yellow raincoat, our kit list for filming the video featured a range of great products from Canon to Adobe. Our director and in-house videographer Simon let us know what was used to create the Halloween magic…

The kit

CAMERA: Canon C100

“The C100 is nice and simple to use,” says Simon. “The controls are quite similar to Canon’s DSLRs, so setting white balance, aperture and ISO is all very quick and straightforward. It’s also pretty compact for carrying around and setting up – the camera, lens, multiple mics and power all fit in one backpack-style camera bag.

“The camcorder is known for its ability in low light, which was useful for some of those dark storeroom shots where I bumped the ISO up pretty high without the noise getting unbearable. I tried out a different picture profile for this video than I usually use for normal corporate videos. The ‘cinema’ profile is very flat in tone and desaturated in colour, which provides greater scope for grading later on.”

day2_5

“One thing that I wish this model had (which the C100 Mk II and other cameras in the range have) is higher frame rate shooting options. A couple of shots would have looked really good in slow motion, but at 25fps I couldn’t slow it down without the image visibly lagging.”

You can still pick up the Canon C100 Mk I at only £2039, or treat yourself to the C100 Mk II at only £2999, which now comes with a FREE Atomos Ninja Blade!

LENS: Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Telephoto Lens

“This range of focal lengths provides great versatility without having to keep buying and swapping lots of lenses. I used the longer focal lengths (and positioned myself further from the subject) for getting shots with nice shallow depth of field, and shorter ones for fitting everything in the shot where space was restricted. At 2.8L it’s also pretty fast, which again helped in those low light situations.”

day1_10

Get the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Telephoto Lens for just £626, now with a 3 year warranty!

MICROPHONE: Sennheiser MD 46 Handheld Cardioid Dynamic ENG Microphone

“I’d never used this mic before, but my usual lapel and shotgun mics were picking up too much background noise when we were trying to record dialogue in a noisy office. Its intended use is for reporters, so it’s very directional and cuts out a lot of peripheral sound. This meant we had to position it very carefully when trying to pick up multiple voices, hence some very precarious boom setups (that actually appear in the video once or twice if you look closely…).”

The Sennheiser MD 46 is just £190 right now!

MICROPHONE: Rode NTG-2 Shotgun Condenser Microphone

“For backup, and because I had a spare channel I thought I may as well use, I kept my usual shotgun mic attached to the top of the camera and pointed at the action the whole time. I didn’t end up mixing this into the edit very much, but at low levels it occasionally added a subtle ambience when combined with the Sennheiser.”

day2_15

Get the Rode NTG-2 for just £174!

LIGHTING: Photoflex Medium Starlite Kit

“We have two big softboxes and a smaller Dedolight. I don’t really have any clue on how you’re meant to use these, but spent a lot of time aimlessly moving them around so everyone else would think I knew what I was doing.”

If you know more about lights than Simon, we’ve got the Photoflex Medium Starlite Kit for £440

 

The editing software

INGEST: Adobe Premiere Pro and Media Encoder

“One feature in Premiere Pro which I’m a big fan of is Proxy Workflow. I set the project ingest settings to automatically create proxies, so whenever I imported from the browser window into the project in Premiere Pro, Media Encoder would open and do its thing in the background. This then meant I could edit with lower resolution previews, so there was none of the frustrating stopping and starting that can occur when working with full HD footage. There’s a simple toggle switch for going between the proxies and the full res files, which I used when working on finer detail grading and sharpening.”

EDITING: Adobe Premiere Pro

“I used Premiere Pro for sorting through the source files, adding markers at points in the shots that I thought I was going to use, and started dragging clips on to a timeline. Because the video has distinct scenes, with different looks and sound requirements, I edited each one separately in a nested sequence, then lined them all up and worked out the transitions between them on a master sequence. I used a lot more film dissolve and crossfades from the Effects pane than I would on a normal corporate video to try and get the edits flowing smoothly and to accentuate the atmosphere of the scenes.”

day3_6

COLOUR CORRECTION AND GRADING: Lumetri Color in Premiere Pro

“Lumetri Color is an incredibly powerful and versatile colour tool in Premiere Pro. My process with it was to use its ‘basic’ controls to hone the white balance and overall levels so that the shot looked neutral. Then it has a set of ‘creative’ controls for giving the footage more of a distinct look.

day2_3

“After trying out a LOT of third party LUTs, I ended up using the same one throughout (but increased and decreased in strength), which just seemed most natural with the footage we’d shot and added an extra level of consistency between shots. I did all of this on adjustment layers above the source footage on the timeline so that each clip was treated the same without having to go in and apply to each individually.”

SOUND MIXING: Premiere Pro

“All of the sound was mixed in Premiere Pro too. The source footage generally needed some gain control for consistency between clips and then a bit of EQ, compression and a tiny hint of reverb. I also used noise reduction for most of the dialogue because the ambient office sounds were distracting and inconsistent between shots. Because it then sounded unnaturally quiet between lines, I mixed in a stock effect of an office environment.”

SPECIAL EFFECTS: After Effects

“Titles and a few special effects were done in After Effects. The dynamic link between the apps allows me to see the graphics I’m working on in After Effects over the video footage in Premiere Pro instantly.

“Trying to make the cloud of bats was my first experience with the Particle World effect. I think it’s more designed for small, non-descript particles that look like rain drops or suchlike, but I applied it to a bat shape I made in Illustrator and it turned out pretty much how I wanted.”

day1_2

“The clown coming out of the computer was also my first go at filming against a green screen. I tried to get the lighting even and consistent with the shot I needed to composite it with while shooting, then used the Keylight effect in After Effects. Playing around with the Keylight controls managed to isolate the clown how I wanted, but I found I still had to animate a couple of masks frame by frame to get it looking right as it moved in and out of the laptop.”

Find out more about Adobe’s great video-editing apps here.

You’ll save too… check out our scarily good savings at www.Jigsaw24.com/offers, get in touch with the sales team on 03332 400 888 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, events and hauntings, follow us on Twitter @WeAreJigsaw24 or like us on Facebook.

 

NAB 2017: Blackmagic Design announces DaVinci Resolve 14

NAB 2017: Blackmagic Design announces DaVinci Resolve 14

Blackmagic Design today announced DaVinci Resolve 14, the biggest release in the history of the product, and an update that has been designed to be more than an incremental software update, but a complete revolution in post production. Blackmagic Design believes the new DaVinci Resolve will break through the stagnant toolsets used in post production, and offer a new path forward for the smallest as well as the largest facilities in the world.

New features include up to 10 times performance improvement, a whole new audio post production suite with Fairlight audio built into DaVinci Resolve, and multi user collaboration tools that let multiple people edit, color and mix audio from multiple systems, all in the same project at the same time.

What this means is that DaVinci Resolve 14 is like 3 high end applications in one. Customers get professional editing, color correction and the new Fairlight audio tools. All it takes is a single click to switch between editing, color and audio. Then the new multi user collaboration tools let everyone work on the same project at the same time, so customers no longer have to import, export, translate or conform projects.

DaVinci Resolve 14 dramatically changes post production from a linear to a parallel workflow, so everyone can work at the same time, giving editors, colorists and audio engineers more time to be creative.

A public beta of DaVinci Resolve 14 will be available today and for immediate download from the Blackmagic Design website. DaVinci Resolve 14 will also be demonstrated on the Blackmagic Design NAB 2017 booth at #SL216.

DaVinci Resolve 14 features a new high performance playback engine that’s up to 10 times faster than before.

In addition to extensive CPU and GPU optimizations, customers also get better threading and GPU pipelining, lower latency, much faster UI refresh rates, support for Apple Metal and much more. This makes DaVinci Resolve 14 faster and more responsive than ever so customers get incredibly fluid performance and more precise editing, even on long timelines with thousands of clips. Scrubbing and playback are instantaneous and there is powerful new acceleration for processor intensive formats like H.264, making it possible to edit 4K images on a laptop.

 

Legendary Fairlight audio is now fully built into the DaVinci Resolve 14 application itself. Fairlight is famous for being used at the world’s highest end studios for audio post on film and television. Fairlight is known for both its superior sound quality and its speed. Customers get a massive set of professional audio tools for recording, editing and sweetening, professional bussing, mixing and routing, and multi format mastering to 3D audio formats such as 5.1, 7.1, Dolby and even 22.2. The state of the art, super low latency audio engine is designed to work with 192kHz 96-bit audio and delivers up to 1,000 tracks with real time EQ, dynamics processing and plug-ins on every track when used with the Fairlight Audio Accelerator. Plus the new Fairlight audio can record up to 96 channels while simultaneously playing back up to 150 audio channels, while mixing it all in real time! There simply is no other software available with this level of dedicated audio power.

The new Fairlight audio in DaVinci Resolve 14 features a full multi track timeline for subframe editing of audio, down to the sample level. The mixer is designed to let customers create sophisticated sequences and has several main, sub and aux buses for mastering and delivering to multiple formats at the same time. Every channel on the mixer features real time 6 band parametric EQ, along with expander/gate, compressor and limiter dynamics. Clip time warping lets customers stretch or compress audio without shifting pitch. In addition, every single parameter can be automated, even VST plug ins, using a variety of automation modes.

In addition to audio editing, sweetening, and mixing, Fairlight audio in DaVinci Resolve 14 also includes multi channel recording tools that are far superior to those found in most editing systems. Customers can record voice overs or even an entire symphony orchestra while also monitoring video and multiple channels of dialog and sound effects. The advanced monitoring can handle buses up to 24 channels wide with customizable fold-up and fold-down for crossing between formats. Monitoring can be done on up to 16 different sets of speakers, including massive cinematic installations.

DaVinci Resolve 14 works with the Fairlight Audio Accelerator card, which gives customers up to 1,000 zero latency tracks and real time effects processing for EQ, dynamics, and up to 6 VST plug ins per channel. Even without the accelerator, most modern computers can still process more than 60 tracks in real time. In addition, DaVinci Resolve 14 can also be used to drive the entire line of Fairlight hardware mixing consoles, which makes working on complex multi track projects faster than any other system available.

The advanced busing and mixing architecture also allows multi language and multi format delivery to be handled simultaneously from the same project, dramatically reducing the time required to deliver final masters.

All this editing, color correction and audio post production power also means multiple people need to work on the same job, at the same time. This is where the revolutionary new collaboration tools are vital to the dream of revolutionizing post production. The new collaboration tools completely redefines post production workflows by supporting simultaneous editing, color correction and audio post. Assistant editors can prepare footage while editors cut the picture, colorists grade the shots, and sound editors mix and finish audio, all in the same project at the same time.

New bin, clip and timeline locking lets users safely work on a specific part of the project without overwriting each other. There’s also a built in secure chat client that lets team members talk to each other from within DaVinci Resolve without the need for an external internet connection. This secure chat is vital because most high end facilities are unable to use services such as Slack or Skype for messaging because they need to remain completely disconnected from the internet to ensure security against hacking.

The new timeline comparison tool makes it fast and easy to see differences and merge changes between two timelines by viewing a side by side comparison of every single change made between users. Best of all, DaVinci Resolve 14 works with the storage you already have. There’s no need to buy expensive or proprietary storage and servers to work collaboratively.

The new multi user features of DaVinci Resolve 14 eliminate the need for importing, exporting, translating and conforming projects. Customers no longer have to wait for a locked edit before starting color and audio work. Switching between editing, color and audio is just a single click away. That means picture editors, colorists, and sound editors can all work in parallel, making DaVinci Resolve 14 the fastest way to edit, grade, mix and deliver projects.

In addition to the incredible performance improvements, editors also get new slip and slide trim commands that make it easier to dynamically trim live on the fly during playback. They can now save interface layout presets, view multiple bins at once and open multiple bin windows. New marker overlays, audio only and video only edit tools, track colors, and subframe audio editing make it the world’s most powerful creative editor.

For colorists, there are over 20 new Resolve FX filters that make it easy to remove dust, fix dead pixels, warp images and more. The amazing new face enhancement tool automatically recognizes and tracks facial features so colorists can quickly smooth skin, adjust skin tone, brighten eyes, and even change lip color, all without having to manually select or rotoscope any part of the image. The face enhancement tool is an indispensable feature that colorists will use every single day. In addition, there are new stabilization, match move, and other image processing tools that give colorists more creative options than ever before.

Customers can add a DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel, DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel or a DaVinci Resolve Advanced Control panel for the ultimate high speed workflow. All controls are logically placed near natural hand positions and are made out of the highest quality materials. Smooth, high resolution weighted trackballs and precision engineered knobs and dials feature the perfect amount of resistance for accurately adjusting any setting. The DaVinci Resolve control panels give colorists and editors fluid, hands on control over multiple parameters at the same time, allowing them to create looks that are simply impossible with a standard mouse.

“The overwhelming success of DaVinci Resolve has been incredibly exciting. It has become the world’s fastest growing editing system and now we’re taking it to the next level with DaVinci Resolve 14,” said Grant Petty, CEO, Blackmagic Design. “With this new version, we didn’t want to do an incremental update. We wanted to make a large leap forward and break new ground. It’s also much more exciting for the whole engineering team here at Blackmagic Design! We are really excited about how quickly editors are switching and we hope that a new generation of audio engineers will enter the industry. Together, we can all work to continue making it the best editing, color correction and now audio software in the world!”

Blackmagic Design also announced a price reduction for DaVinci Resolve Studio from $995 to only $299. It costs less than most annual cloud based subscription plans, making DaVinci Resolve more affordable to more customers.

The free version of DaVinci Resolve is also available with the same powerful new editing and audio post production features. The $299 DaVinci Resolve 14 Studio version adds the new collaborative multi user tools, over 20 new Resolve FX including the advanced face enhancement tools, 4K and 120fps project support, stereoscopic 3D, optical quality blur and mist effects, film grain, de-noise tools and much more. Best of all, DaVinci Resolve 14 Studio does not require a connection to the internet or a cloud subscription to work.

In addition, Blackmagic Design has also announced a new worldwide training and certification program, along with certified curriculum for DaVinci Resolve. Customers can learn at their own pace by purchasing the Blackmagic Design series of books, or they can take training courses online or in person at certified training centers. More details are available on the DaVinci Resolve website.

DaVinci Resolve 14 runs on all major platforms, including Mac, Windows and Linux, making it easy to integrate with existing systems and workflows. Customers running Red Hat or CentOS Linux can even build their own workstations using low cost motherboards, extremely fast processors, massive amounts of RAM and up to 8 GPUs for incredible real time performance.

Availability and Price

The public beta of DaVinci Resolve 14 is available today as a free download from the Blackmagic Design website for all current DaVinci Resolve and DaVinci Resolve Studio customers. DaVinci Resolve Studio is available for $299 from Blackmagic Design resellers worldwide.

If you want to know more on the biggest and best NAB Show releases, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter‘Like’ us on Facebook or take a look at our roundup post.

NAB 2017: What editors need to know after Avid Connect

NAB 2017: What editors need to know after Avid Connect

We’re all of four hours into and Avid have already announced new I/O hardware, VM options for Media Composer, and the welcome return of Script Sync and Phrase Find at their Avid Connect event. Here’s a quick roundup of their post offerings so far. 

DNxIQ

Let’s talk hardware first. DNxIQ is the successor to the Artist DNxIO, and delivers extensive format support for everything from SD to 4K. Avid’s intention is to make life easier for those of you who have found yourself delivering to more and more formats, having to take on new channels and devices without reducing support for older formats.

The DNxIQ has the same features and functions of the DNxIO, but has been upgraded to Thunderbolt 3 and PCIe Gen3 host connections, and adds support for Universal Mastering. It allows you to quickly and easily ingest, monitor, and output SD, HD, 2K, UHD, and 4K media and cross-convert formats and framerates on baseband output SDI, HDMI, and analog connections with Universal Mastering (as long as you have Media Composer | Symphony Option.)

Dana Ruzicka, chief product officer at Avid, explains that “Avid Artist | DNxIQ is built to handle any project that walks through the door – SD all the way to UHD, 4K and beyond. It features the most popular connection types encountered in a professional facility, and through its real-time Universal Mastering technology, it can easily deliver final masters for virtually any format and market.”

Blackmagic Design have had a hand in the design, resulting in a sleek, sturdy unit that is ompatible with any Avid Artist Suite solution and many third-party creative tools—including Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve, Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and more.

DNxIQ is available now. DNxIO will be discontinued on May 22nd or whenever Avid run out of stock, with support to continue until 2022.

Media Composer | First

Avid have announced that within the quarter they’ll be relaunching Media Composer | First, a free, entry-level version of the leading NLE.

With four video tracks, eight audio tracks, and a host of built-in visual effects, transitions, colour correction presets and titling templates, users can quickly cut together layers of video, dialogue, music and sound effects to produce captivating, professional-quality video content.

Media Composer | First also allows easy sharing, with one-click publishing to popular social media channels including YouTube, Vimeo and Facebook.

 

If you want to know more on the biggest and best NAB Show releases, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter‘Like’ us on Facebook or take a look at our roundup post.

Media Composer v8.8 is here!

Media Composer v8.8 is here!

Media Composer v8.8 is here and ready for download! Head to the Download Centre in your Avid account to get the update now, or keep reading to see what’s been updated.

New features

Version 8.8 has seen a raft of tweaks and new features to make your editing workflow even smoother. Here are the highlights – a more detailed breakdown is available in the Avid documentation:

– Timeline Clip Notes You can add notes to clips in the Timeline and view all the notes in the Timeline Clip Notes Window. (Used to be Adding Comments.)

– Frame Cache for Effects Editing enabling frame cache when performing colour correction.

– ScriptSync ScriptSync uses phonetic-indexing technology to analyse the audio portion of a clip and match it to lines of the script text.

– Bin sharing on non-Avid storage The editing application will notify you if your third party storage is emulating Avid NEXIS or Avid ISIS storage.

– Change to Find Window A few changes have been made to the Find Window.

– Change to the Script Window A few changes have been made to the Script Window.

Bug fixes

As well as new features, v8.8 also brings with it a range of welcome bug fixes, including:

– Not being able to open a project if the project was named Clip.

– Not being able to successfully drag and drop audio clips above or below the TC track.

–  Custom Colours not staying in the colour palette when using clip colour.

–  Disabling the ‘Auto-create new tracks’ setting was ignored when using Edit While Capture clips.

–  The Cutlist EndHdl timecode was short one frame.

–  (List Tool) The marker values were empty in an Optical List.

–  (List Tool) Markers did not display on Opticals in an Assemble List.

–  When performing an Export to Device with an XDCAM device attached, you might have received a ‘Please connect XDCAM device or insert disk’ message.

–  In some instances, exporting a graphic from linked XAVC Long GOP media failed with an assertion error.

–  In some instances, rendering a sequence with muted clips resulted in clips being partially rendered.

–  The Project Window summary might have been empty on a Mac system, or contained garbled text on a Windows system.

–  When importing some .wav files, the name of the files include a / which is an illegal character that is not supported in Interplay. This is because Media Composer uses the values of Scene/Take for the file name when importing Broadcast Wave files. An additional Import Setting has been added to the Import Settings dialogue. The ‘Use Broadcast Wave Scene and Take for Clip Names’ is defaulted on. If you are importing Broadcast Wave files and you do not want them named using Scene/Take, you must deselect this option in the Import Settings:Audio dialogue box.
Limitations:  There are 5 limitations and workarounds outlined in the ReadMe for Media Composer v8.8.
New Nvidia Driver: Nvidia Driver v375.86 is supported with this release.

Availability

Media Composer v8.8 is available now. If you have already installed the latest version of Media Composer, you will be notified of the availability of the v8.8 upgrade via the Application Manager v17.2. The Apps tab will also provide a link to download and install the update.

If you bought Media Composer on or after 16th February, 2017 you will receive this v8.8 update in your Avid Master Account.

If you are on a current Upgrade & Support plan you can download the Media Composer v8.8 update either from your Avid Master Account or the Avid Download Centre (login and password required). However, if you are not on a current Upgrade & Support contract, you must purchase either a new Media Composer Subscription or Perpetual licence to receive this update.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

NAB 2016: Premiere Pro and FCP X add support for Tangent panels

NAB 2016: Premiere Pro and FCP X add support for Tangent panels

As well as announcing availability of their long-awaited Ripple panel, Tangent Devices have revealed that Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple Final Cut Pro X now sport improved Tangent integration. 

“Adobe announced that they’re including support of our panels in the next release of Premier Pro. They have also implemented full support of our Mapper application, so you’ll be able to customise the layout of the controls on the panels. This is really exciting news for us and we’ve been looking forward to this as it’s been the source of a lot of requests from users,” said Tangent’s spokesperson. (You can see the Adobe announcement here).

Tangent also announced that support for FCP X’s Color Finale plug-in. “We already have pretty much full control of FCP X with our panels thanks to the efforts of Sam Mestman and his extensive use of our Mapper. Now the guys at Color Grading Central have announced full support of our panels in their Color Finale plug-in for FCP X. With Support for the Mapper included, you can customise your control layouts. We’re excited to see this expansion for the support of our panels within FCP X and we’re looking forward to the release of this new version. You can read more about Color Finale here.”

For more on the latest NAB Show releases, take a look at our roundup post, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Blackmagic Design announce DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update

Blackmagic Design announce DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update

Blackmagic Design today announced the immediate availability of DaVinci Resolve 12.1, which adds dozens of new features such as remote rendering, 10-bit viewers, new editing and colour correction tools, and more. The DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update is available now for both DaVinci Resolve 12 and DaVinci Resolve 12 Studio customers, and can be downloaded from the Blackmagic Design website.

DaVinci Resolve 12 is the most successful update in the history of the software and has become the industry’s fastest growing video editor. The feedback from the DaVinci Resolve community has been overwhelmingly positive and Blackmagic Design engineers have been hard at work to add even more of the features that professional editors and colourists have asked for.

DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update gives editors the ability to select clips when using the blade tool, extend freeze frames, use faders on generators and titles, perform negative timecode offsets, filter clips more efficiently, media manage groups of selected timeline clips, sort bins and footage more easily, create better filters for smart bins, and much more. Customers also get improved subclip support with Final Cut Pro 7 XMLs and improved audio rendering of audio transitions.

For colourists, DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update adds the ability to colour correct nested timelines and to decompose compound nodes along with new manual keyframe options for Power Windows, support for 3D stereo decision lists version 0.25, filtering of keyframed clips, the option to copy flags and markers when performing ColorTrace and more.

In addition, the free DaVinci Resolve 12.1 update adds support for native display profiles on Mac OS X El Capitan, along with the option to enable 10-bit precision in the on screen viewers. That means customers using the new iMac with Retina P3 display will be able to see more colour, detail and dynamic range than ever before.

Since its release in September, the rapidly growing community of DaVinci Resolve 12 editors has meant that developers are now bringing their best and most exciting OpenFX plugins to DaVinci Resolve. For example, GenArts has been working with Blackmagic Design to bring new Sapphire Builder support to DaVinci Resolve 12.

Expected in an upcoming Sapphire 9.0.1 release, Builder will let DaVinci Resolve users combine Sapphire plug-ins together in any order to create a virtually unlimited number of unique effects and transitions. “DaVinci Resolve is the first OFX host to support Sapphire Builder!” said Sapphire product manager Brian Fox, “We’re very excited that DaVinci Resolve 12.1 users can benefit from all the new capabilities of Sapphire Builder.”

To support the growing momentum of DaVinci Resolve 12, Blackmagic Design has conducted multiple hands-on training sessions with the Motion Pictures Editor’s Guild in Hollywood. “I feel like DaVinci Resolve 12 is the NLE users have been waiting for all of these years,” said Noam Kroll, Los Angeles based filmmaker and editor whose feature film credits include The Grace Of Jake (2015), Shake The Dust (2014) and Footsteps (2012). “DaVinci Resolve 12 offers the same track based system that many editors are most comfortable with, but also provides truly innovative tools that feel very forward thinking.”

“Since it was released in September, DaVinci Resolve 12 has been downloaded by more customers than any other version of the software and has become the industry’s fastest growing video editor,” said Grant Petty, CEO, Blackmagic Design. “DaVinci Resolve is now used on virtually all major films, television shows and commercials! We’ve listened to feedback from professional editors and colourists and are excited to give them this free update which includes even more of the features they’ve been asking for!”

What’s new in DaVinci Resolve 12.1?

– Remote rendering on DaVinci Resolve Studio.
– Support for native display colour profiles on OS X.
– Preferences option to enable 10-bit precision on viewers on OS X 10.11 El Capitan.
– Ability to select clips when in blade mode.
– Support for faders on generators and titles.
– Ability to extend freeze frames from the start of the edit.
– Ability to media manage selected clips on a timeline.
– Ability to perform negative timecode offset in clip attributes.
– Improved support for sub-clips from FCP7 XML.
– Improved rendering of audio transitions (cross-fades) and audio faders.
– Auto scroll during timeline item resize.
– Improved sorting in media storage and media pool.
– Support for smart bin filtering based on clip type.
– Ability to move clips and timelines from a smart bin view.
– Support for moving files to the trash instead of deleting them permanently when using the media manager on both Mac and Windows systems.
– Ability to delete multiple projects and folders in project manager.
– Ability to decompose a compound node.
– Ability to grade nested timelines.
– Ability to filter clips based on whether they have keyframes.
– Ability to manually keyframe power windows in frame mode even without tracking.
– Ability to freeze the current frame on an external matte.
– User option to copy flags and markers when performing ColorTrace.
– Improved ACEScc support.
– Support for stereo decision list (SDL) v0.25.
– Support for RED SDK v6.0.4.
– Support for embedding timecode in audio output.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Save 23% on an Avid Artist DNxIO when you trade in your old interface!

Save 23% on an Avid Artist DNxIO when you trade in your old interface!

For a limited time, save £600 off the purchase price of a standalone Artist | DNxIO when you trade in a selected open IO from AJA, Blackmagic Design, Matrox or MOTU.

Avid Artist | DNxIO is a powerful, professional video I/O interface designed to simplify and accelerate your entire HD, Ultra HD, 2K, and 4K workflow. Available as standalone hardware or bundled with industry-standard Media Composer software, Artist | DNxIO enables you to capture, monitor, and output media quickly – in the highest quality possible. And because the interface, which includes hardware by Blackmagic Design, is designed to be open and flexible, you can use it with Avid and other creative tools too.

Why move to DNxIO?

– Capture and play back stunning high-resolution video through advanced 12G-SDI, 6G-SDI, and HDMI 2.0 connections.

– Boost your editing efficiency with onboard processing, which provides real-time or accelerated media encoding, decoding, conversion, and colour conversion.

– Work with SD, HD, 2K, 4K, 2D, 3D, and other media, with up to 12-bit, 60fps support use your favourite video, audio, and graphic tools, including Media Composer (8.4.1 or higher), Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC, Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and Fusion, and more.

– Connect with Thunderbolt 2 and PCIe-enabled laptops and workstations.

 

The small print

– Trade-ins must be purchased before September 30, 2015.

– Offer only applies to trade-in Artist | DNxIO standalone units. Standalone units do not include Media Composer software or client connectivity kits (Thunderbolt cable or PCIe cable and card); both must be purchased separately.

– This offer cannot be combined with other special offers.

– This offer cannot be combined with Q3 DNxIO Channel rebate.

– Open I/O hardware must be returned within 30 days after receiving Artist | DNxIO or purchaser will be invoiced the difference for a full-priced standalone DNxIO.

For a complete list of the Open I/O hardware eligible for trade-in, visit the DNxIO Trade-in page.

 

Avid Artist | DNxIO – Open IO Trade in Offer

 

At Jigsaw24, we are very proud to be a fully authorised Avid Elite Reseller, with all Artist Series Controllers available to test drive at our Soho-based ‘Steampunk‘ demo studios.

Want to find out more about Avid trade-ins? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or Like’ us on Facebook.


Upgrading Swansea City FC to HD and exceeding Premiership standards

Upgrading Swansea City FC to HD and exceeding Premiership standards

Having finished in the top half of the Premiership and qualified for the UEFA Europa league, Swansea City decided it was time to update their media infrastructure in order to give fans, pundits and their analysis team the best possible coverage of each game. Using Blackmagic Design’s production gear, they were able to update their network to HD, increase the number of video feeds they can deal with and how quickly they can be dealt with.

During summer 2013, Swansea City’s senior multimedia officer, Mark Williams, decided to update the AV system at Liberty Stadium. “It’s a relatively young stadium, and at the time there was no idea that we’d have Premiership football straight away, so everything was done in the most economical way possible. This only included provision for analogue systems throughout the stadium, as opposed to the digital we all know today.”

At the end of the 2013 season, Liberty Stadium could only send a single camera feed from their OB facilities to the rest of the stadium, and were struggling to keep up with the Premiership’s requirements.

“When we first came up to the Premiership, there was a requirement for 80 different cable runs between the stadium and the OB compound, whereas at the start of the season there needed to be 240 in place [to cater for more overseas television],” explained Mark. “We wanted to make sure that we took the specification from the Premier League and at very least we matched it. We were hoping to future proof the system for years to come.”

Managing feeds centrally using ATEM Television Studio

As well as increasing the stadium network’s capacity, Mark wanted to improve the efficiency of the media team’s workflow. They decided to centralise their entire system by creating a Fibre bridge between the control room and OB compound using a pair of ATEM Studio Converters and an SDI-to-Fibre converter.

“The ATEM Television Studio has been fantastic,” said Mark. “It gives us the ability to switch the video between different sources, and monitor all the various sources [which is important because] in addition to the video feeds coming in from the game itself, we’ve got cable runs going down to a couple of interview areas – two in the tunnels and one in our press room. So it’s allowed my desk to become a mini television gallery; I can monitor all the feeds, make sure everything is running smoothly and then switch stuff to the live TV in the concourse, or between the various computers that we’ve got in the office to record things.”

Helping analysis teams make the most of every game

Once broadcasters supply the feeds to the control room, Mark and his team use a pair of 16×16 Micro Videohubs to route the signals to over 130 press seats, 54 commentary positions, the team’s analysis department and their commercial arm.

“The strange thing about football analysis is that they need video in order to do their work, but that’s the one thing that they never get taught. We’ve had a lot of interns and new graduates, and they’ve learned a lot about the tactical analysis side of things, but not what they need to do in order to get that video content in the first place. So we worked with the coaches and the analysis department to make sure they get what they need, because regardless of what we do with the press, ultimately it’s what goes on on the pitch that’s key.”

In order to help the analysis team further, Mark’s next job is to move them from their current analogue system to an H.264-based one that allows them to capture HD feeds during international games, where no analogue signal is available.

“We use one of the Blackmagic Design’s H.264 Pro Recorders, and the great thing about them is that you can take any of the various formats that are out there, whether they be HD, SD, analogue, composite, you name it, and convert it into a feed that literally just goes into [any computer] via USB cable, which almost any machine can handle,” explained Mark. “It allows the team to have an entire game in full HD quality in a fairly manageable file size, which they can feed off to the coaching staff, copy to laptops or stick it on hard drives, so when they do their more detailed analysis afterwards, they’ve got the best quality that they can.”

Improving efficiency and speeding up recording workflows

“I realised one of the things we needed to do was make our workflow more efficient,” explained Mark. Because they never know how much time they have between two managers coming in to be interviewed after a game, the media team can’t work on the first interview until the second is complete – “we don’t want to waste time filming and recapturing, so we capture while we’re filming.”

Mark and his team now use Micro Videohubs to direct one interview feed to each of the media department’s Mac Pros, enabling them to record both independently while recording the OB compound’s post-match broadcast to an Atomos Samurai. “We’ve got multiple systems that allow us to keep working rather than sitting and waiting for something to happen. At the last game it went from an hour and 15 minutes from when the interview finished [to us having processed it] to something like 15 minutes.”

Finding an IT provider to help with the transition

“The very first Mac bought by the club was bought from Jigsaw24,” Mark said. “All the analysis software was on PC, but all the editing software was on the Mac, so we needed the flexibility of working between the two [which is only possible on Mac].

“We saw it as a good opportunity to build up a lasting relationship, because not only do Jigsaw24 do Macs, but they also do all the Blackmagic Design kit, they do camera equipment, and it made sense for us all to look for a company that was able to cater for all the various aspects of what we did.

“The sales team have been really helpful, and really patient with me as well, to be totally honest! And I spent hours on the phone with them, because they were our main go-between with Blackmagic Design, and were instrumental in being able to stretch our budget further than it was originally going to go.”

Continuing to move to digital

The system at Liberty Stadium is still evolving, and future developments include plans to add a giant screen to the stadium so that they can stream content to fans mid-game and, behind the scenes, to replace their analogue-to-digital converters with HyperDeck Shuttles, which will allow them to record ProRes straight to SSD.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Staffordshire Uni: Meeting industry standards with an HD studio

Staffordshire Uni: Meeting industry standards with an HD studio

Staffordshire University offer a range of courses centred around film, video and journalism. In order to bring their studio in line with industry standards and ensure that students were learning current practice, they upgraded their in-house news room to HD and replaced a cumbersome studio back end with NewTek’s TriCaster. As the new term got underway, we dropped in to see the results…

The university wanted to upgrade everything to HD, and make sure that the signal students were outputting could be shared with displays around the studio so that their content could be monitored and assessed. “It was obvious that we needed to move the studio to high definition,” said Richard, “[and the funding we’d managed to make available] meant that we’d be able to make a clean sweep, tackle all the problems and make sure that we got a full solution, rather than taking a piecemeal approach.”

“The biggest problem we had [was that the studio] was SD,” explained Richard Mortimer, head of the university’s media centre technical team. “But more than that, it was SD composite. Anthony from Jigsaw24 did us a report on our options, and basically that was the poorest quality signal we could get!”

Modernising the studio back end

Richard was aware of NewTek’s TriCaster range – simple but powerful live production solutions that let you up, down and cross-convert inputs of different resolutions, add titles, graphics and virtual backdrops, and then stream them live to the web, record them or share them with digital signage.

“The team from Jigsaw24 were brilliantly, brilliantly helpful,” said Richard. “They recommended a TriCaster without any prompting from me, and I thought that was great, because that’s what I was looking at anyway. They also pulled together the idea of having the HD-SDI signal from the cameras broken down to HDMI by Blackmagic Design switchers so it’ll fit our HD TV screens, which is brilliant. “

TriCaster control surface at Staffordshire uni

The 13 screens that were installed round the open plan studio can now be put to much more varied use, able to show live feeds for assessors, pre-recorded footage on open nights, or feeds from different cameras during production.

Supporting students in different disciplines

“One of the main goals of the new setup was to make things a little bit easier for our broadcast journalism students. They’re not particularly technical – they have to crew their own productions, but they’re not going to go to do [technical work] for a living,” said Richard. But at the same time, he wanted to be able to offer students with a more technical bent the chance to do more.

TriCaster would allow them to bring titles and graphics in-house and create their own virtual sets, while being relatively simple to use.

“In terms of an approach to teaching TriCaster, I was a bit apprehensive,” admits Richard. “But, funnily enough, I managed to cover everything in an hour and a half, which was great. Once you actually work out how it functions, it’s a very logical piece of equipment, and then you can break that information down and disseminate it to students so that it’s not intimidating any more, it’s just very powerful.”

Positive responses from students and staff

There was only a month to get the studio assembled, installed and running, so the staff at Staffordshire spent a day taking a crash course in TriCaster with our NewTek Certified Operator, and backed this up with additional video training. However, they’re finding it easy to get students on board with the new technology.

“They’ve been really, really impressed,” said Richard. “The feedback after the first session was excellent. They all got very excited, especially when they saw what TriCaster could do. You can see it gets their creative juices flowing, because they know they can put their virtual studio anywhere and make something that looks really professional.

Camera and auto cue at staffordshire uni

“But more than that, both the technical staff and the academic staff now see the scope [of what they can teach]. Open days are a big part of what we do here, and now the news room’s got that wow factor for an open day. So we’re really happy with it. All the courses we’ve worked on with Jigsaw24 have now got a USP they can use to attract new students and retain current ones.”

Updating cameras across the department

As well as moving their news room to HD, Staffordshire University updated the studio cameras to a more recent model, and spent a month trialling the Canon C100 with an Atomos Ninja. This combination gave them the high image quality, shallow depth of field and portable form factor they were after, and Richard and his team eventually rolled them out across film production courses.

“We’d previously used the EX3, but we were seeing an influx of students who were shying away from using our kit and were clubbing together to buy their own DSLR hybrids,” explained Richard. “The last thing we wanted was for students to be renting cameras at their own expense, but it wasn’t until Anthony came in to talk about the news set and continued the conversation with a couple of us that we found out about the Ninja and how, given the price difference between the C100 and the C300, adding a Ninja to the C100 made the C300 less and less cost effective for us.

TrIcaster setup at Staffordshire uni

“That’s why we keep working with Jigsaw24 – we trust them to give us completely impartial advice and solutions. I’ve never once felt that someone at Jigsaw24 is pushing a product at the expense of what we need; they just give us a completely open and honest appraisal. And they’re happy to work with us when it comes to funding as well, so we have a range of choices depending on the level of funding we get.”

Since then, we’ve helped the university add high-end cameras to their production courses, including Sony’s F55 and JVC’s FS700. “Now we’ve got mind-blowing technology we can put in front of students, things that they’re not going to see until they’ve been in industry a while and gotten their feet under the table.” The upshot? Staffordshire University’s students go out into the job market with more high-end skills than their competitors, and are able to adapt to professional workflows more easily.

Staffordshire uni's news room setup

Evolving the setup further with Jigsaw24

The university’s next plan is to add a RAID solution to its post-production suites, and they plan to work with us again on that project. “Every time I come to our account manager with a question, he will find somebody in the team that has got the expertise to guide us, which is brill. It’s really important for us because finance is getting harder to get hold of in higher education, so we need to make sure that what we do spend, we spend correctly. And this is why we use Jigsaw24 – because it’s a guarantee that when we do commit to funding that we’ll end up getting a return on the investment.”

Interested in finding out more about TriCaster and the solution we put together at Staffordshire? Get in touch on 03332 409 306, email sales@Jigsaw24 or drop us a comment in the box below.

Workflows we love: Avid and DaVinci Resolve at Timeline TV

Workflows we love: Avid and DaVinci Resolve at Timeline TV

Timeline TV provide coverage for some of the world’s largest sporting events, including Wimbledon, the 2012 Olympics and the Tour de France. Their Timeline North office in MediaCityUK doubles as a base of operations for some ambitious post work, with their first year in MediaCityUK seeing them take on a huge array of work with the BBC, as well as film projects and dubbing work. 

One of the latest projects to go through the facility was ‘Andy Murray: The Man Behind the Racket’, an hour-long documentary for the BBC which chronicled Murray’s run up to Wimbledon 2013. Although Murray picked up injuries during the initial shoot and only returned to competition the day before the project was due to be completed, Timeline TV were able to pull together a final cut in record time thanks to a combination of Avid Symphony, Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve and Avid Pro Tools.

“The Andy Murray documentary was offlined on an Avid Symphony,” explains Eben Clancy, Timeline TV’s Post-Production Director and head of its MediaCityUK facility. “It was due to be onlined in Symphony too, but Andy won Queens the day before the deadline, so we had to extend the offline, which left us with very little time. We sent an AAF of an offline to DaVinci and contracted Chris Packman to grade it – he’s a big DaVinci supporter – while our editor, David Horwell, was still making final tweaks.”

After the final AAF was graded, the project then made a round trip back to Symphony for its final online edit, with a Pro Tools dub being carried out the same way. “Chris managed to grade, render and export an hour long doc in eight hours, which we were seriously impressed by,” says Eben.

His team have been using the same workflow to handle an extremely complex offline for BBC series Fierce Earth. “There are Sapphire effects and time warped shots throughout, plus graphics with nested pictures,” explains Eben, “but we’ve still been able to round trip an Avid AAF through DaVinci and grade every shot, even if we couldn’t always see the final result. The only real issue was the time warped shots. DaVinci could handle shots running at 500% or less, but we had shots running at 5000%. We had to do ‘video mixdowns’ of them and then they all worked smoothly, and we managed to grade seven episodes in two and a half days.

“The main benefit of Avid AAF and round tripping from Symphony to Resolve is that the final sequences came back into Avid with all the Sapphire plug-ins, nested shots etc perfectly in place. The edit was identical to the offline but the pictures being referenced were beautifully graded. Joy!”

Want to know more about your post workflow options? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.