A day in the life of… artist, illustrator and lecturer Jo Berry

A day in the life of… artist, illustrator and lecturer Jo Berry

We sat down with freelance illustrator, artist and lecturer Jo Berry to find out about her work in the field of scientific imaging, what she’s working on right now, and the technology she uses to bring her creations to life…

What have you been working on recently?

I’ve been working with scientists a lot over the past few years. And I’m working on some different case study projects right now with five different research institutions. One of them is Sahlgrenska Academy in Gothenburg. I went over there last September to work with them in their laboratory, as I’m really interested in microscopy and advanced imaging. So what I’ve been doing is going into different labs, observing research scientists in action and participating in scientific experiments over a range of different subjects.

A couple of years ago, I went down to the Natural History Museum and I worked with their electron microscopes to examine natural objects such as butterfly wings and radiolarian – lots of things that were really, really tiny and you could only see through an electron microscope. I’ve been doing quite a lot of work with the images and data that I obtained there.

I’m also working with the University of Nottingham. I’ve been working with the med school there for a number of years, collaborating with their cell signalling and pharmacology department. They also have a top of the range SLIM (School of Life Sciences Imaging) department, where they image all sorts of biological cell samples to find out how they operate. They’ve been working to find out more about the heart, diabetes and obesity. So I’ve been taking film and static images of scientists at work and collecting a range of data to create new interpretations of science and art-data visualisations.

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How do you use creative technology like Mac or Adobe Creative Cloud?

The scientific department at the University of Nottingham has PCs, so I don’t use Macs there. However, at home I have two Macs – including a brand new one – and an Apple laptop, and I used Macs while I was working in Sweden. For me, working on Mac feels more natural and it’s just something that I’ve gotten used to. The only thing I’d like is a bit more flexibility for the programs that I use to be able to move across PC and Mac.

At the university, I take the information and data I’ve gathered and load it into the scientific software they use on their PCs, and then I export it so it can be used in Adobe software. I mainly use Photoshop to crop and to layer, and I spend a lot of time doing digital drawing in Illustrator. I do my drawing very specifically as I do a lot of laser cutting – so it’s done for the purpose of being laser cut or exported into another 3D program. However, I love the simplicity of these drawings and see them as artworks in their own right.

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What aspect of digital design and drawing are you interested in?

I’m really interested in the pixilation that is part of the imagery that comes out of these scientific computations. Of course, they look like really slick, beautiful images but they’re actually made up of hundreds of thousands of pixels. So I’m interested in simplifying the pattern that you get with the different colours and layers of these images. In Adobe Illustrator, I’ve been using squares and rectangles a lot recently, and I match them together with Pathfinder. I do this to create intricate drawings that are sourced and created digitally, and then can be moved into another program to be reprocessed as laser cut images at a later date. I take a long time drawing, and I aim to be able to show real depth and intricacy in the images. I’m also interested in making things that combine science and design, and creating something that is another interpretation of science.

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You mentioned your work with film earlier. What does that involve?

I capture moving images of cells, then export them into Quicktime and use them to make stills. But I make movies, too. I’m doing a lot of work with Premiere Pro at the moment, and I’m looking to doing even more of those sorts of projects going forward. I’m currently studying part-time for a PhD, so I’ve been documenting what I’ve been doing while I’ve been going into these labs with a handheld Panasonic camera. So, I’m getting all of this data from these experiments – still images and film – and I’m trying to put them together so I’ve got footage of scientists actually working. Then I’ve been combining this footage with these beautiful, moving scientific images to create a sort of montage documenting exactly what I’ve been doing and observing.

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What has your experience with Premiere Pro been like?

It’s quite simple and I find it a bit like putting together a collage of sorts. But of course, even after you’ve sorted out your timeline, you’ve still got to do the audio to go with the images. I think it just takes time to sit and do it, and learn it all properly. To be honest, everything I’ve ever learned on a computer I’ve done by just getting hands-on. I also like to learn software based on how I think I can work with it.

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Could you tell me about your work as a lecturer? 

I lecture in illustration at Birmingham City University in the department of visual communication. I teach illustration to first and final year students and I also train them in Adobe Illustrator. Obviously, I really like working in a cross-disciplinary manner as I’m interested in both drawing and technology, and there are opportunities within the department to do that. I enjoy finding out how you can use a computer and digital programs to create things such as drawings, movies and whatever else. Jo_Berry_Image11

What technology has had the biggest impact on your work as an illustrator?

Adobe. Working in Illustrator has had a profound effect. About ten or fifteen years ago when I first started working in Adobe Illustrator, that completely changed the nature of my work. At the time, I was doing an advanced research fellowship at Loughborough University, and I was trying to make light drawings in unusual ways. I was making light boxes where I was drilling holes into perspex and lighting them. But then as soon as I started working in Illustrator and I could laser cut, everything became so much more sophisticated. It moved away from craft, and became design. I really liked the purity of Illustrator, because you can work in a very linear way with shapes and Pathfinder, and include the computational source material.

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What creative and design trends are you thinking about as we head into 2018?

I don’t follow trends – I’m not really bothered about them. I mean, I read and follow a lot of different things, and I’ll go to exhibitions and people will say “are you thinking about doing this” or “have you read this or that”, but I think you’ve got to find your own individual voice. Of course, this involves research and a design process, but it’s important to really think about what you want your work to be about. And that’s what I encourage my students to do. I tell them to come up with their own ideas and concepts, and not to copy anybody else or be too heavily influenced. I suppose we’re all a bit like sponges – we soak everything in, but it really is essential to find your own voice while grounding it in knowledge.

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Exhibiting regularly and widely throughout the country and internationally, Jo’s work is highly regarded, with pieces in the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A), Arts Council England (ACE) East Midland Collections, Nottingham University Medical School and Zeiss, Munich. Residencies include the Florence Trust Studios, London, the Natural History Museum, London and Lakeside Arts Centre, Nottingham University.

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If you’d like to find out more about about any of the creative technology mentioned above, give us a call on 03332 400 888 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook. 

IBC 2017: Adobe reveals new tools for Premiere Pro and Audition

IBC 2017: Adobe reveals new tools for Premiere Pro and Audition

Adobe’s MAX conference isn’t until October, but being good sports they’ve joined the general IBC announcement scrum and announced some exciting new video and audio tools to coincide with the show. (They’re also live streaming demos on Facebook, if you need something to distract you from the fact that you’re not in Amsterdam.)

Adobe are focusing on four big changes: Character Animator, a VR viewing environment, Team Projects, and auto-ducking in Audition. Here’s the official breakdown:

Character Animator 1.0 is unveiled with changes to core and custom animation functions, such as pose-to-pose blending, new physics behaviors and visual puppet controls. Adobe Sensei helps improve lip-sync capability by accurately matching mouth shape with spoken sounds.

Virtual reality video creation will be possible with a dedicated viewing environment in Premiere Pro. Editors can experience the deeply engaging qualities of content, review their timeline and use keyboard driven editing for trimming and markers while wearing the same VR head-mounts as their audience. In addition, audio can be determined by orientation or position and exported as ambisonics audio for VR-enabled platforms such as YouTube and Facebook. VR effects and transitions are now native and accelerated via the Mercury playback engine.

With the release of Team Projects, Adobe has improved collaborative workflows on the Local Area Network with managed access features that allow users to lock projects and provide read-only access to others. Formerly in beta, Team Projects will offer smoother workflows hosted in Creative Cloud and the ability to more easily manage versions with auto-save history.

Adobe Audition adds flexible session organisation to multi-take workflows and continuous playback while editing. Powered by Adobe Sensei, auto-ducking is added to the Essential Sound panel that automatically adjusts levels by type: dialogue, background sound or music.

If you want to know more, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter‘Like’ us on Facebook or take a look at our IBC roundup.

Celebrating 25 years of Adobe Premiere Pro

Celebrating 25 years of Adobe Premiere Pro

Our birthday twin Premiere Pro has turned 25 this year (both us and Adobe’s industry-leading NLE began life way back in 1992). And while we’ve been building our modest creative technology empire, Premiere has managed to seduce the Coen Brothers, David Fincher and a small army of editors, as evidenced by their birthday video, below. 

Obviously all of these people are just as excited by our birthday, and the gifts they definitely sent us are merely lost in the post.

It’s easy to see why Premiere won people over, though – its earliest iteration was the first software-only editing system that you could run on a normal computer, and by 1994’s version 4.0 it was hitting full screen broadcast quality with 60 fields per frame. By 1996, it was offering a 4K frame size for use with digital signage, and has continued to push resolution limits, with the current version maxing out at 16K x 10K.

Since 2006, a Dynamic Link to Adobe After Effects connected traditional editing timelines to motion graphics and visual effects production, and cross disciplinary support has only increased since the move to Creative Cloud.

You can see a longer, more nostalgia-heavy and occasionally surprising (did you know Netflix had been around since 1997?) rundown of Premiere’s illustrious history here.

In the latest iteration, previewed at NAB, new media manager features in both Premiere Pro and Media Encoder give you much greater control over the handling of your files during the ingest process, and allow for more flexibility when working with very large media. You can set Premiere Pro to copy media to a specific location on your machine as it imports, and even begin editing immediately while your media copies in the background. If your workflow requires a transcode, you can easily set Premiere Pro or Media Encoder to handle that step for you too.

You can also generate proxies on ingest, and toggle between these and your full-res media at one click, in order to better support 6K and 8K workflows. There’s also support for advanced Lumetri scopes and the Rec2020 colourspace.

And when it comes to the workflows of the future – VR, for example, Premiere is ready: VR Video mode allows you to use pan and tilt controls to preview the experience inside the sphere. You can even click-drag directly on the video clip and freely pan around so you know what your viewer would be seeing when looking in a given direction. When you’re ready to share, you can easily add a metadata flag to ensure you’ll get the full panoramic experience on supported sites like YouTube and Facebook.

If you want to know more about Adobe, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email adobe@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter, or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Bringing Zebedee the zebra to life with Adobe Creative Cloud

Bringing Zebedee the zebra to life with Adobe Creative Cloud

We’ve loved the cracking Christmas ads from Apple, John Lewis, H&M and Sainsbury’s this year, so we decided to join in the fun and create a festive-themed feature of our own. 

Taking some solid inspiration from John Lewis’s popular ‘Buster the Boxer’ campaign, I took to my favourite Adobe Creative Cloud apps to bring our very own trampolining critter to life – Zebedee the zebra! 

Zebedee enjoying a popular zebra pass time – trampolining!
Zebedee enjoying a popular zebra past time – trampolining!

I use Adobe Creative Cloud for all my animation work because it’s easy to use. App integration allows you to switch between programs without worrying about file compatibility or loss of progress, making the transition from design to video nice and simple.

When I began the initial design, I booted up Illustrator and created each scene in 2D, making sure to keep any component I wanted to animate independently on a separate layer. Once I’d finished the 2D design, I imported the layers for each scene into After Effects and enabled them for 3D. From there I added a camera and lighting, providing some depth to the artwork.

Zebedee makes a friend...
Zebedee makes a friend…

Adobe’s neat animation tools allowed me to fine tune the basics of the design, animating the camera and other moving parts, including clouds and the hedgehog. I did this using basic layer variables like position and rotation, and made use of a few expressions when I needed items to loop or react to components from another layer (expressions are a feature of Adobe After Effects, allowing you to create relationships between layer properties, using the keyframes of one property to dynamically animate other layers).

One of the great things about Creative Cloud for animation is that it supports a whole load of different plug-ins. These can be utilised to provide new tools that increase the functionality of your apps, which is great for continued efficiency and productivity, and saves you having to use other design programs entirely. When it came to animating Zebedee the zebra, I made use of After Effects’ puppet tool and a third-party rigging plug-in called DUIK. DUIK allows moving parts to be controlled ‘realistically’, keeping  appendages attached to the appropriate body part – in this case, hooves to legs and legs to body.

"YouTube are gonna love this..."
“YouTube are gonna love this…”

I wasn’t too happy with my first attempt at texturing the snow in the garden using a vector texture brush in Illustrator, and ended up finishing the job with a third-party brush in Photoshop. Thankfully, replacing all the layers in After Effects was quick and easy and didn’t affect any of the animating I’d already done (thanks, app integration!).

Once I’d completed each scene, I imported them all as After Effects compositions into Premiere Pro. From there, I arranged them on the timeline, edited the transitions and added the music. Then I used Media Encoder to export each cut for approval (I exported at a lower resolution until the finished version was fully signed off), which allowed me to continue working with Premiere Pro in the meantime.

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You can check out Zebedee the zebra’s Christmas debut below:

Want to know more about Adobe Creative Cloud? Give us a call on 03332 409 251 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

A spotter’s guide to Adobe Creative Cloud desktop apps

A spotter’s guide to Adobe Creative Cloud desktop apps

Adobe’s Creative Cloud apps are the gold standard in professional software for creatives of all stripes. But whether you’re a graphic designer who uses Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator day-in, day-out, or a videographer who knows Premiere Pro and After Effects like the back of your hand, there’s a wealth of apps you have access to under a Creative Cloud All Apps subscription that, while you may not be that familiar with, could be a very welcome addition to your creative workflow.

So here we’ve put together a quick spotter’s guide to all Adobe’s fantastic desktop apps, and where to find them. How many have you tried?

Design tools

Photoshop. Adobe Photoshop CC is your common or garden digital imaging app, the number one choice the world over for photographers and designers. It lets you enhance, retouch, and manipulate photographs and images in any way you can imagine, with clever content aware technology and powerful design tools like editable shapes and vector layers. (Also available as a Single App.)

Lightroom. Often spotted in the same habitat as Photoshop, Lightroom lets you organise, edit and share your all photos from anywhere, whether that’s on your computer, on the web, or on your iPad, iPhone or Android devices.

Illustrator. Adobe Illustrator CC is the industry-standard vector graphics software. Create compelling vector art and illustrations using advanced, precise drawing and typography tools, and work quickly and intuitively on everything from brand identities and marketing materials to graphics for the web, video, and film. (Also available as a Single App.)

InDesign. InDesign CC is professional page layout software for print and digital publishing. Use it to design, preflight, and publish a broad range of content in print, online, and for tablet apps. You can create simple or complex layouts quickly and efficiently with precise control over typography, built-in creative tools, and an intuitive design environment. (Also available as a Single App.)

Experience Design (beta). Still a fledgling at the moment, the Experience Design app is designed to improve teamwork among workgroups who are prototyping apps and mobile content, and allows you to build and share prototypes, then collaborate and feed back on them in realtime.

InCopy. Adobe InCopy CC makes it easy to collaborate in demanding editorial workflows. With InCopy CC, writers, editors, and designers can work simultaneously on a single document without overwriting each other’s contributions. (Also available as a Single App.)

Video tools

Premiere Pro. Adobe Premiere Pro CC is a powerful, customisable, nonlinear video editor that lets you import and freely combine virtually any type of media, from video shot on a phone to raw 5K and higher resolution footage, and then edit in its native format without wasting time transcoding. (Also available as a Single App.)

After Effects. The industry-leading animation and creative compositing software used by a wide variety of motion graphics and visual effects artists, After Effects CC gives you powerful timesaving features like a Live 3D Pipeline with Maxon Cinema4D software and Mask Tracker, which lets you apply a mask and effect that travels frame by frame throughout your composite. (Also available as a Single App.)

Audition. Adobe Audition CC is a cross-platform audio editor that speeds up production for video, radio, music, games, and more, thanks to uncompromising sound quality and intuitive workflows. (Also available as a Single App.)

Media Encoder. Ingest, transcode, create proxies, and output any format – this powerful media management tool allows users to work with media in a unified way across applications, tightly integrating with Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC and other apps for a seamless media processing workflow.

SpeedGrade. SpeedGrade is a colour grading application that delivers layer-based colour correction and look design tools to ensure that digital video projects are visually consistent and aesthetically compelling.

Prelude. Rapidly tag and transcode video footage and quickly create a rough cut with Prelude – a video logging and ingest tool designed for intuitive, efficient media organisation and metadata entry.

Story Plus. This service combines collaborative screenwriting, reporting, and scheduling tools with script metadata logging to help you edit video in Premiere Pro. (Also available as a Single App.)

Character Animator (beta). Create 2D characters in Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC and bring them to life in Character Animator. Act out movements and record your voice using your webcam and microphone, with realtime facial expression and motion tracking.

Fuse (preview). The new 3D modelling app lets you quickly create unique human characters for your Adobe Photoshop CC images, designs, prototypes and more.

Web tools

Dreamweaver. Build sites and apps with Adobe Dreamweaver CC – the all-in-one, industry-leading web design tool. Dreamweaver CC provides a robust and integrated solution to design, develop, and publish projects for any screen size. (Also available as a Single App.)

Muse. Adobe Muse CC lets you design and publish HTML websites for desktop and mobile devices without writing code. Design freely using familiar tools and shortcuts, easily add engaging effects and interactivity, and even integrate third party functionality like blogs and shopping carts. (Also available as a Single App.)

Animate. Design interactive animations with cutting-edge drawing tools and publish them to multiple platforms – including Flash/Adobe AIR, HTML5 canvas, WebGL, or even custom platforms – and reach viewers on broadcast TV or virtually any desktop or mobile device. (Also available as a Single App.)

Flash Builder. A development environment for building games and applications using the ActionScript language and the open source Flex framework. Flash Builder Premium includes professional testing tools such as profilers, network monitoring, and unit testing support.

Scout. Adobe Scout is a lightweight but comprehensive SWF profiling tool designed for Adobe Flash game developers. Any SWF file, regardless of whether it runs on mobile devices or in browsers, can be quickly profiled with no change to the code — and Adobe Scout quickly and efficiently detects problems that could affect performance.

PhoneGap Build. Take the pain out of developing mobile apps by simply uploading your HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript assets to the Adobe PhoneGap Build cloud service, and Adobe will do all the work of compiling for you while you put your feet up.

Spark. Are you a social butterfly? Create social graphics, web stories and animated videos with real punch, using Spark’s free graphic design app.

Workflow tools

Acrobat Pro DC. Keep a sharp eye out for the all-new Adobe Acrobat DC with Adobe Document Cloud, designed to change the way you work with important business documents. Do away with ink signatures and overnight envelopes, protect your important documents, work anywhere and edit anything.

Bridge. Bridge CC gives you centralised access to all the files and assets you need for your creative projects. Organise personal and team assets, batch edit with ease, add watermarks, set centralised colour preferences, and even upload your photos to Adobe Stock.

Creative Cloud. Where it all begins. The Creative Cloud for desktop app is where you can quickly launch and update your desktop apps, manage and share your assets, download fonts and assets, and showcase and discover creative work on Behance, all while staying conveniently out of sight.

To find out more about Adobe Creative Cloud for teams, get in touch with our team on 03332 409 251 or email Adobe@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or like us on Facebook

Adobe reveal new Creative Cloud features at Adobe MAX

Adobe reveal new Creative Cloud features at Adobe MAX

Adobe have used their annual Adobe MAX conference to announce a raft of new features for Creative Cloud users, which we can expect to join the Adobe lineup between now and the end of the year. The new improvements are designed to make it easier for creatives to deal with the new challenges presented by virtual and augmented reality, and the rise in demand for 3D content.  

Adobe’s latest updates are designed to promote collaboration, mobility, a ‘cloud first’ philosophy (in which work lives primarily in the cloud and is then edited on various devices but not housed on them), and machine learning, which constitutes extending the kind of intelligent technology that powers Photoshop’s Context Aware tools into other apps.

Coming soon: Project Felix

Felix is intended to allow graphic designers to combine 2D and 3D assets to create their images without having to familiarise themselves with more complicated applications like After Effects.

The beta is going to be opened to paid Creative Cloud for teams members at the end of the year. Once you’re on board, you’ll be able to use Project Felix to develop photorealistic 3D images using a workflow that’s specifically designed for people who aren’t experienced 3D content creators.

Key features announced as part of the beta include a free library of models, materials and lights to help you get started straight away, realtime rendering so that you can view updates as you design, and machine learning features that include auto lighting and auto horizon positioning tools.

Based on user feedback so far, Adobe are already working to improve interoperability with Photoshop and Illustrator, make label/decal application easier, add GPU rendering support and more, so it’s well worth keeping an eye out for the start of the beta.

Now in beta: Adobe Experience Design CC

The Experience Design (XD) beta continues apace, with over 50 features added since March. The app is designed to improve teamwork among workgroups who are prototyping apps and mobile content, and allows you to build and share prototypes, then collaborate and feed back on them in realtime. Adobe say it’s now ready for everyday use on computers that are running macOS, so if you’ve been holding off on downloading XD until it became more stable, now’s the time to get involved.

Major new additions include the arrival of Layers, a slightly modified version of the layers you know from Photoshop et al that makes it easier to navigate between artboards and work with elements on each. The idea is that Layers will speed up your XD workflow by allowing you to focus on just the elements you want to modify (the Layers panel contextually displays only the layers for the artboard that you select).

To navigate to the artboard you need, just double-click its icon and XD will automatically pan and zoom to that artboard, fitting it into the application window. Double-clicking on groups allows you to explore and navigate to nested elements. You can also reorder, rename, show/hide, export, make symbols and lock/unlock layers quickly and easily.

Another addition is Symbols, aka objects that you use throughout your design, and which are all dynamically updated if you edit once instance. All you need to do to create a Symbol is hit Cmd+K. For ease of organisation, all your Symbols are stored in their own library, and you can drag and drop them from there into your prototype.

Once everything is added, your peers will be able to comment on it in realtime, and preview changes on different devices as they are made.

The XD beta is currently available on macOS, iOS and Android platforms, with Windows 10 compatibility coming soon.

What’s new in… desktop design apps

The biggest overall change is to your in-app searching capabilities. The new Universal Search in Photoshop not only lets you search all panels, menus, libraries and assets from a single pane (great for finding a command you’ve forgotten the location of), but includes a Visual Search component.

A bit like Google Images, Visual Search allows you to find an image that’s almost right in a library or Adobe Stock, and then search specifically for images that are similar to that one. In a nice additional touch, you can add text descriptors to the image you’ve searched, so if we were to have found a particularly noble picture of our mascot, the zebra, but wanted it to be standing against a setting sun, we could search “[selected image] + sunset” to see pictures that feature similar zebras against the sunset, or ask for a zebra with water in the foreground and mountains behind. This will also work when searching for textures and shadows to add to 3D objects.

Both Photoshop and Illustrator are now going to include template libraries to help new users (or experienced users who are short on time) to get started on common document types. Additional templates will be available in Adobe Stock, and should you download one that you don’t have the right fonts for, Typekit will automatically source and download them for you.

Photoshop also benefits from tighter SVG integration, an enhanced Properties Panel, and support for SVG fonts.

As well as templates, Illustrator is poised to receive font, text and glyph enhancements as a result of Adobe answering 81 common user requests in this update.

Dreamweaver is going to get a new, streamlined interface with a fast, flexible coding engine, but we haven’t managed to get a peek yet – we’ll let you know more when we do.

What’s new in… video apps

The emphasis here is on preparing video and animation workflows for the influx of 3D and virtual/augmented reality projects that are expected to hit the pipeline as everyone attempts to develop the next Pokemon Go.

A new 3D rendering engine in After Effects allows for the creation of extruded text and shape layers, and handles CPU rendering of 3D elements up to 20 times faster than the current version.

As part of their push to integrate more machine learning elements into Creative Cloud, Premiere Pro is getting a new auto-aware virtual reality feature that auto detects the kind of content you’re creating, and a new Social Publishing Panel (released in beta at MAX) will optimise the publishing of content you create in Premiere Pro across multiple social channels, so you achieve maximum impact.

There were two other key beta trials launched at Adobe MAX: Team Projects and Character Animator. Character Animator is designed to improve the connection between Photoshop, Illustrator and video apps to speed up puppet creation and animation – you might have seen it in action during The Simpsons’ live episode or when a cartoon version of Donald Trump appeared on the The Late Show. By mapping characters’ movement patterns onto an actor’s features, Character Animator lets you see your animated creations walk and talk in realtime.

Team Projects allows Creative Cloud for teams and Creative Cloud for enterprise members to co-edit video files simultaneously in Premiere Pro, After Effects and Prelude, so multiple users can be working on the same frame at the same time, but all accessing it from different machines.

What’s new in… mobile apps

The big news is that Photoshop Sketch, Comp and Photoshop Fix are now going to be available on Android. There have also been a number of workflow improvements, including automatic creation of mockups, universal copy/paste within and across documents (hooray!) and enhanced font support in Comp.

Photoshop Brush is also going to be supported in Sketch, and both Sketch and Draw are going to gain new layer blend modes.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 251 or email adobe@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

IBC 2016: Adobe unveils new virtual reality, character animation and 3D innovations

IBC 2016: Adobe unveils new virtual reality, character animation and 3D innovations

Adobe today revealed a series of innovations coming soon in Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Marketing Cloud in advance of IBC in Amsterdam. Keeping pace with high velocity content demands across both new and traditional platforms, Adobe will showcase advancements in VR, 3D, motion graphics and character animation supported by tools to deliver, measure and monetise TV and film content across multiple screens.

At IBC, Adobe will demonstrate these advancements at Stand 7.G27 in the RAI Amsterdam Convention Center and at over 107 partner booths from September 9-13.

“Adobe is helping video creators of all kinds – from broadcasters and big movie studios to YouTubers and brands – create their best work,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management at Adobe. “As these stories take shape, ideas need to seamlessly move between tools, technologies and teams. Adobe’s multiscreen solution helps media companies connect with their audiences in a personalised way by delivering compelling experiences and adopting immersive capabilities such as 3D, VR and AR.”

Video editors from Hollywood to Sundance to YouTube are taking note of Adobe Creative Cloud, most recently Disney’s Pete’s Dragon, and through the work of next-generation creators like Smosh, RocketJump and SoKrispyMedia. Television networks are making history by bringing characters to life with Character Animator in The Simpsons and Cartoon Donald Trump on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Additionally, NBC Sports recently leveraged Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions to power the digital delivery of the 2016 Rio Olympics.

“I love keeping everything under one roof. I love the idea that it’s all housed under one banner and that all the apps within Adobe Creative Cloud can talk to each other. And for all of my future projects I want to really explore that workflow. It’s a really exciting sphere to be working within,” said David Lowery, director of Disney’s Pete’s Dragon.

Driving the future of VR, 3D and animation

Expanding on the new VR features launched earlier this year, Adobe is unveiling additional innovation in the next release of Premiere Pro CC including auto-aware VR that seamlessly detects and applies the correct setting to stereoscopic and monoscopic media. Capabilities in Adobe Primetime empower media companies to capture the full potential of VR by building sustainable businesses and delivering premium viewing experiences. These include video playback support, dynamic ad insertion and content protection via Adobe’s Virtual Reality Digital Rights Management (VRDRM).

Rapidly accelerating 3D content creation, Adobe will showcase a 3D rendering engine which increases the pace and efficiency of 3D content generation. Artists can also now create editable 3D elements such as text and shape layers intuitively from within After Effects CC with new Cinerender technology from MAXON. Puppet creation and animation with Character Animator, Adobe’s popular live motion-capture tool, will get even better with faster and easier through integrated round-trip functionality between Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Powerful integrated workflows and performance enhancements

With Adobe Creative Cloud, post-production teams can move freely from application to application without interrupting the creative flow. New features in both Creative Cloud and Marketing Cloud let media companies and content creators engage their audiences more effectively across any screen:

Huge productivity gains (up to six times faster) with Adobe Stock video are reported in a new study by Pfeiffer Consulting, which compares using video with Adobe Stock and other stock services.

Performance improvements with real-time playback in a new After Effects video preview architecture lets users play raw footage in real-time, eliminating the need to cache before previewing footage. GPU-accelerated effects enable faster render compositions.

Refined Lumetri Color tools in Premiere Pro CC now provides HDR10 metadata support for editing and delivering HDR10 for new HDR-enabled TVs and displays, plus expanded support for color space metadata, providing greater precision for delivering brilliant imagery.

Destination Publishing to render and share video to Behance, the world’s largest creative community, is now possible along with YouTube, Facebook and Twitter.

Better captions and subtitles in Premiere Pro CC lets users easily create and fine-tune captions to enliven silent auto-play video previews on Facebook for higher engagement, target different languages or improve accessibility for hearing impaired viewers.

Actionable analytics in Adobe Analytics for Video allows users to measure streams instead of just video starts and stops, delivering a more comprehensive view of how videos are consumed.

Premium ad-supported viewing on connected devices is now supported in Adobe Primetime, allowing media companies to deliver quality and buffer-free experiences, while weaving content and ads together into a single stream.

Collaboration for Connected Teams

Adobe will showcase its new hosted collaboration service, Team Projects, to address the challenge of working with other editors and designers across multiple projects and tools. Built on Adobe Anywhere technology, Team Projects integrates deep collaboration features such as version control and smart conflict resolutions and allows editors and motion graphics artists to work simultaneously within Adobe Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC and Adobe Prelude CC. Additionally, the data in Team Projects will be securely hosted in the cloud and media files referenced by Team Projects can be locally stored source files or shared lightweight proxies.

Helpful Links from Adobe

Unveiling Created Connectivity – Creative Cloud.
YouTube Live Event with Jason Levine on September 7 from 8-9 a.m. PT.

Learn more about Creative Cloud Video.
Adobe Feature Reveal “What’s New?” and data sheet.
Adobe Feature Reveal Blog

For more on the latest IBC releases, take a look at our roundup post, give us a call on 03332 409 306, email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Video: Our design team on… Adobe Creative Cloud for video

Video: Our design team on… Adobe Creative Cloud for video

For anyone looking to bring video production in-house, Adobe Premiere Pro in Creative Cloud is the first port of call. Here, graphic designer Simon runs us through his basic shooting and editing workflow with Premiere Pro, while the rest of the marketing team show off their (frankly shocking) pool skills…

– Want to get the most out of Adobe Creative Cloud? For tutorials, tips and other resources, check out our Adobe Creative Cloud Hub

Want to know more about Adobe Creative Cloud for teams? Give us a call on 03332 409 251, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

Avid welcome Adobe Premiere Pro users to MediaCentral

Avid welcome Adobe Premiere Pro users to MediaCentral

Premiere Pro users, your years of warring with your Avid-loving counterparts are over. The two editing giants have joined together to bring harmony to the NLE market and peace to our timelines (and/or do some cynical marketplace positioning, depending on your worldview).

Adobe have previously teamed up with Maxon to give After Effects users dynamic access to richer 3D tools, and now they’re doing their editors a similar favour. The update will allow Premiere Pro editors to connect to Avid’s production environment via Avid MediaCentral | UX.

How does it work?

You will need to head to myavid.com and download the MediaCentral Premiere Pro Connector and install it on each of your Premiere Pro-equipped machines. You’ll then be able to see the Avid MediaCentral | UX HTML5 user interface within the Premiere Pro interface, and use it to access the wonderfully named “Avid asset management realm”, which consists of Interplay | Production, Interplay | MAM and iNEWS.

What can you do? 

Once you enter the realm, you’ll be able to:

– Search for media assets using the central Media | Index.

– Chat with other MediaCentral | UX users.

– Navigate database hierarchies.

– See, add and modify metadata.

Will you be able to register Avid Assets to Premiere Pro projects for editing? 

Hell yes, friend. Not only that, but you’ll be able to check out master clips in Premiere-supported formats, check out simple sequences for in-place editing and send rendered sequences back to Avid.

If your Avid media is not directly supported in Premiere, you’ll still be able to access it via an optional conversion to MXF OP-1a and simple XML shortlists.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Adobe Creative Cloud 2016: What’s new?

Adobe Creative Cloud 2016: What’s new?

It’s hard to believe that a year’s passed since Adobe unveiled Stock, Artboards and a whole load of cool new features in their desktop and mobile apps. Now, they’re at it again, with the 2016 update to Adobe Creative Cloud for teams. This comes replete with a whole arsenal of new creative tools and improvements across Photoshop, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, After Effects and more, as well as always-welcome performance improvements.

Our pick of the new features

With dozens of new features available for desktop apps as well as mobile and Adobe Stock, we’d be here all day talking about every one, so we’ll concentrate on the main apps that our creative team use day-in, day-out (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere Pro and After Effects, mainly), and some of the tools and workflow improvements they’re most excited about.

Photoshop. With every new iteration of Photoshop, there are always one or two big crowdpleasers, and this time round is no different. The Content-Aware tools were a real game-changer when they were originally released, and the new Content-Aware Crop, which fills in the gaps when you rotate an image or expand your canvas, looks very handy indeed.

The one that we’ve had the most fun with so far, though, is Face Aware Liquify, a very clever tool for detecting and magically making adjustments to facial features in images. Graphic designer Liana had a play with an unsuspecting subject’s face below, and had this to say: “On first play, it’s really good, detecting faces straight away and very accurately. You can use the sliders or grab the various facial features, and to be honest I wasn’t expecting there to be so many options, eg eye tilt or distance. Obviously these examples are the extremes, but I think this would be very useful in making subtle changes.” Cheers, Li…

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 15.10.49

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 15.09.23

Another new Photoshop feature of interest is Match Font, which identifies Latin fonts in images. “It’s recommended to get a straight-on image, so I did a quick Perspective Warp because the photo was at an angle,” Liana said. “It did seem a bit hit and miss (just nudging the box along could make it come up with different results even though the text was still in the box). But even though it didn’t find the font that we’ve used here, it did come up with similar suggestions. I love the fact that it searches Typekit too, which is obviously really handy. I think this is a good tool to get a similar style font and various options, but maybe not if you really need ‘that exact font’.”

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 15.42.37

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 15.42.25

Illustrator. No silly faces in this one, unfortunately, just cold hard workflow improvements. The latest update for Illustrator features Fast Export of assets and artboards. When you need an icon scaled for multiple screen sizes, instead of exporting each size configuration individually, now you can export the icon across all the required size configurations at the same time with just one click, which is going to make life a lot easier for our design team.

Premiere Pro and After Effects. Earlier this year at NAB 2016, Adobe made a big announcement about upcoming updates to their core Creative Cloud for teams (CCT) video apps. They promised VR video capabilities and faster than ever media ingest and editing workflows in Premiere Pro CC, as well as a more responsive After Effects (as well as the usual performance and stability enhancements across all the Adobe video and audio applications). And with this update, they’ve made good on their word.

New Virtual Reality features have been added to Premiere Pro, including a ‘field of view’ mode which makes it easy for editors and filmmakers to preview media and see what the viewer will see. Then there’s the new Character Animator in After Effects, which makes it easy to match an animated character to a real-life actor’s speech and movements in real time. If you’re a Simpsons fan, you’ll be interested to know that this latest update was recently tested by The Simpsons’ animation team when they used it for Homer Simpson’s live Q&A session in the 15th May episode.

Creative Cloud Libraries. Creative Cloud Libraries was a big hit with our design team when it first came out, meaning easier access to key tools, colours, fonts and more. And now it’s even better, with read-only library collaboration, followable Libraries with a Send Link, an updated Libraries panel for Photoshop CC, Dreamweaver CC (Beta), Adobe Muse CC and Animate CC, and new asset type support for InDesign CC, including gradients, colours, styles, tints and swatches.

When can I get them?

As always, if you’re a current Creative Cloud for teams subscriber, you get all new updates immediately for free. A notification should have pinged up in your Creative Cloud app. If you don’t currently hold an Adobe Creative Cloud subscription though, you can of course get in touch with us, as the UK’s leading Adobe reseller, to get it all sorted.

– Want to get the most out of Adobe Creative Cloud? For tutorials, tips and other resources, check out our Adobe Creative Cloud Hub

Want to know more about Adobe Creative Cloud for teams? Give us a call on 03332 409 251, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.