A day in the life of… Stuart Tolley from Transmission

A day in the life of… Stuart Tolley from Transmission

We caught up with typographical designer, art director and author Stuart Tolley to find out what he gets up to while plying his trade at Transmission, his Brighton-based studio. He’s got years of experience working on magazines, a passion for minimalism (he even wrote a book about it!) and prefers to do things the old fashioned way. So we asked him all about how he’s adapted to changes in the creative industry since beginning his career, his work, the technology he uses, what keeps him inspired, and his predictions for the future of design.

What have you been working on today?

Today I’ve been working on typographical experiments for the covers of a forthcoming book series. I’ve been picking apart the headline type using Adobe apps to typographically represent complex theories about psychology, sociology, economics and creativity. I mainly use InDesign, which I combine with Photoshop and Illustrator for other parts of the work.

You’ve authored some books of your own; what were they about?

The first one was called Collectors Edition: Innovative Packaging and Graphics, which is about the renaissance of vinyl records and limited edition publications. My second book, MIN: The New Simplicity in Graphic Design, is about the rebirth of minimalism in graphic design.

Transmission_stuart_img_1

Could you tell us a bit more about your work on minimalism?

Well, MIN has been out for about a year and is published by Thames & Hudson. There have previously been books about the history of minimalism, but no one has published an up to date book about it, particularly in the last 5 years.

We’ve become accustomed to the stripped back designs of contemporary technology and this is really important to me, as I didn’t want the book to be a historical look at the style. I think people are really aware of minimalism now, particularly with the stripped back user experience and product design of Apple devices – this is all part of a decluttered lifestyle, which is something I wanted to tap into. The reductive nature of the book has informed a lot of my studio projects too, because I like working with quite abstract concepts and then stripping them down to their barest form.

What are the biggest challenges you face in keeping the studio up and running?

The main challenge is balancing all the [on-going] design projects we have coming through the studio. We’re a small studio and I take care of all the creative work – I like to do everything myself as well, which I suppose is a bit controlling.

Transmission_9

What technology were you using back in the 90s, at the start of your career? 

I graduated from university in 1999. There were a small amount of computers within the university, but at the time I was using the photographic dark rooms to enlarge my negatives and creating a lot of photographic work. We were on really basic versions of editing software back then – I think I might have used Photoshop a handful of times.

The thing is, I was right on that cusp. Magazines were produced using a cut and paste layout system, with lots of rulers and measuring grids. Of course, I missed all of that and started work when Quark was the main publishing tool. Before I left university, I was using the photocopier all the time to print stuff, cutting and pasting, using lots of tape to stick it all down – really hands-on work. Then as soon as I started work people were like “Right, now you need to use QuarkXpress”.

What technology has had the biggest impact on your studio?

I use a lot of Adobe programs. I really am a slave to Apple and Adobe at the minute. A big change was when InDesign overtook Quark, which was the industry standard. I think the biggest change for me personally is how social media and marketing have developed. The internet is now the mainstream form for viewing information, especially since the explosion of smartphones.

There was a period, maybe a decade ago, where I was working on print and magazine projects, but nobody was interested in print at all. Just a constant stream of “nos”; people were demanding apps and stuff for tablets instead. But magazine apps haven’t really taken over as much as people predicted, and instead we’re witnessing a golden era of independent magazine production that’s targeted at very specific audiences.

How did you adapt to the latest trends, whether it was online, video or animation? 

I didn’t. The rise of digital design and user experience has exploded really in the last four or five years, all while I was making my books. I was kind of blissfully unaware and then popped out the other side of it. That’s when I realised the design industry had changed quite a bit. But, for me, it’s quite important to just stick to your guns and say, “You know what, this is what I love to do and they’ll be an audience for it.” I think once I realised that, that’s when I decided I didn’t need to be making loads of apps or websites just to keep up, because there are so many people that are doing that anyway.

Transmission_5

When did you get your first Mac?

My first Mac was a big old [Power Mac] G4 desktop, which had a great big screen. It was all that was available at the time and I got it almost as soon as I left university and had enough money. I was working at Sleazenation magazine at the time and used it to create freelance work on the side. I now have an iMac with a Retina screen, the highest spec I could get, which I use as my main computer.

So how would you say the G4 you were using compares to the top-spec iMac you have now?

The new iMacs are much more streamlined. What you’ve got now is a screen on a stand, whereas before you’d have your [tower], hard drives and a massive monitor with a deep back to it, wires everywhere. Now it’s all part of the decluttering, minimalistic process. You know, the wireless keyboard and mouse, stuff like that – I just embraced it, it was fantastic. 

Do you use any design tablets, like Wacoms?

Some of my friends swear by [Wacoms] but it’s just not something that I’ve ever tried or embraced.

How do your friends use them?

One of them has a huge one; it’s basically just a screen that he draws into. It’s an incredible bit of kit – but as they’re illustrators, they need the ability to draw and work freehand. Whereas I would say my work is more typographical, which I can handle on a mouse.

What Adobe apps do you use the most? 

I use InDesign the most, but I do vector-based work in Illustrator too. I use Photoshop for colour correcting, retouching and things like that. I also use Bridge quite a bit for manipulating images in raw mode, but InDesign is definitely the one I use the most – all day, everyday basically.

Transmission_6

What upcoming trends are you thinking about for the future?

I’ve just created a book about minimalism, so I’m quite interested in the opposite of that. The whole point of the book was that there have been these very ornate designs around for a long time, then minimalism comes along and it refreshes everything. But there will always be a reaction against a current design trends and you’ll probably see a reaction against minimalism in the next few years.

So what will the reaction to minimalism be then?

I think there will be a point where everyone gets bored of things looking really clean, and minimalism just won’t be doing its job anymore, because everything just looks the same. You see it within the independent magazine industry, which are all currently being produced in a minimalist design style. They’ve all got a little logo, top centre, and they all look exactly the same. There are magazines coming out that are totally different, really energetic, and they’ll stand out because they don’t look like everything else. That will be the biggest change; a style will come along that’s more playful and experimental.

Transmission_10

How do you stay productive during busy, stressful times?

I go and sit on the beach. I’ll just take a sketchbook and go and make notes, draw and come up with ideas. It always works. Guaranteed.

What keeps you inspired everyday?

I often change career path and that keeps me inspired. I still work within editorial design, but I’ve shifted quite a lot. I think that’s something that I would like to continue doing, mixing formats and styles. I’ve just been commissioned to work on an exhibition in Brighton this September, so I’m already thinking of ideas for that in the back of my mind. It’s just about doing lots of side projects and changing direction every so often. It’s frightening, but it’s important to do it.

Transmission is a graphic design studio and editorial consultancy, working with clients in the cultural, commercial and charitable industries.

www.transmission.design

If you’d like to find out more about about any of the creative kit mentioned above, give us a call on 03332 400 888, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook. 

 

A guide to Wacom: Choosing the best graphics tablet

A guide to Wacom: Choosing the best graphics tablet

Wacom’s graphics tablet lineup includes solutions for all kinds of creative work, needs and budgets. Here, we present our guide to all things Wacom, including MobileStudio Pro, the Cintiq range and Intuos Pro. 

So which Wacom is for you? All will be revealed in our rundown below…

Our bestselling graphics tablet: Wacom Intuos Pro

Go for this if… you frequently work in creative applications such as InDesign and Photoshop. It’s the ideal tool for precision work on layouts and imagery, offering great resolution and sensitivity, as well as tilt recognition and ExpressKeys.

new_wacom_intuos_pro

With the old Intuos range of tablets now being completely discontinued, Wacom’s entry level option is now the more recent Intuos Pro. The price tag may be a little more than its predecessor, but for the increased outlay, the Intuos Pro does come packed with a rich feature set that makes it ideal for more professional creative work.

The Intuos Pro comes in both medium and large sizes, complete with the Pro Pen 2, a stylus that’s four times more accurate than the previous generation of Pro Pen and boasts 8192 levels of pressure sensitivity – more than any other stylus/tablet combo on the market. This results in a more natural and responsive drawing experience with virtually no lag and natural tilt support. Handily, it doesn’t need batteries or charging, running instead on Wacom’s own peculiar brand of sand magic (resonant inductive coupling, apparently).

The tablets themselves are now just 8mm thick, managing to be slimmer and more compact than their predecessors while maintaining the same size active area. As usual, both models come with a Touch Ring, eight customisable ExpressKeys and on-pen slider switches so that you can have your favourite shortcuts right at your fingertips. The active area features support multitouch gestures (don’t worry, the palm rejection is still excellent).

Options:

Buy the Wacom Intuos Pro Medium (2017) here – £274 ex VAT (£328.80 inc VAT).

Buy the Wacom Intuos Pro Large (2017) here – £374 ex VAT (£448.80 inc VAT).

 

Intuos Pro Paper Edition

Go for this if… If you prefer to start work on good old fashioned paper.

intuos_paper

The Intuos Paper Edition combines an Intuos Pro tablet with a Paper Clip, which affixes to the top of your tablet and tracks pen strokes made with your Wacom Finetip Pen (don’t worry, this is included).

As you draw with your Finetip Pen, the Clip saves each stroke as an editable file which you can subsequently open in your creative software of choice. If you want the digital version of your drawing to be made up of Photoshop-friendly layers, all you need to do is tap a button on your tablet to start a new layer as you’re drawing.

The Intuos Paper Edition can hold up to 200 multi-layered drawings before you need to transfer them to your computer, which can be a Mac or PC. Once you’ve transferred the sketches to your computer, just remove the Clip, pick up a Wacom Pro Pen and edit them as you would any other digital drawing.

Buy the medium Wacom Intuos Paper Edition here – £316 ex VAT (£379.20 inc VAT).

Buy the large Wacom Intuos Paper Edition here – £416 ex VAT (£499.20 inc VAT).  

 

The complete mobile solution: Wacom MobileStudio Pro

Go for this if… you want to combine your graphics tablet and laptop into a single piece of kit.

Wacom_Mobile_Studio_Pro 13

This Intel Powered, tablet computer provides a complete mobile solution for creatives on the go, running full versions of your favourite creative software. With up to 4K resolution and 96% RGB colour performance, as well as the Wacom Pro Pen 2 (which is 4x more pressure-sensitive and 4x more accurate than the previous version), this is a game-changing bit of design kit.

wacom_mobile_studio_pro_16

MobileStudio Pro comes in two versions – 13 and 16. MobileStudio Pro 13 packs a 13.3” screen, designed for maximum mobility, and features 2560×1440 resolution, 96% Adobe RGB colour performance, six ExpressKeys, and three different configurations to choose from. The MobileStudio Pro 16 provides a larger workspace, offering up a 15.6” 3840×2160 resolution display with 94% Adobe RGB colour performance. It also boasts a more substantial eight ExpressKeys and comes in two different configurations. Both models run on full versions of Windows 10.

Options:

Buy Mobile Studio 13, Intel Core i5, 128GB, 8GB, Intel Iris Graphics 550 here – £1374 (£1648.80 inc VAT)

Buy Mobile Studio 13, Intel Core i7, 256GB, 8GB, Intel Iris Graphics 550 here – £1499 (£1798.80 inc VAT)

Buy Mobile Studio 13, Intel Core i7, 512GB, 16GB, Intel Iris Graphics 550 here – £1916 (£2299.20 inc VAT)

Buy Mobile Studio 16, Intel Core i5, 256GB, 8GB, NVIDIA Quadro M600M with 2GB GDDr5 VRAM here – £1833 (£2199.60 inc VAT)

Buy Mobile Studio 16, Intel Core i7, 512GB, 16GB, NVIDIA Quadro M1000M with 4GB GDDr5 VRAM here – £2291 (£2749.20 inc VAT)

 

The quality pen display: Wacom Cintiq display

Go for this if… you work with illustrations, 3D design or any field where you’re more likely to deal with texturing, fine art or brush work.

Wacom Cintiq 27QHD display tablet

Wacom Cintiq brings together pen and touch input with a high res display to create a piece of technology that is, quite simply, unbeatable for digital artists. Rather than having to interpret your on-screen movements on a tablet, you get to paint directly onto the screen, allowing you to achieve incredible accuracy. It’s also completely customisable to your way of working – each stand allows you to position the screen in a way that is comfortable for you, and the ExpressKeys and TouchRings can be tailored to your needs.

There are a number of sizes available – the Cintiq 22HD is a desktop version with a 21.5″ full HD display, while the Cintiq 13HD is a far more portable option. The Cintiq 27QHD, is right at the top end, with improved hi-def resolution in its 2560×1440 pixel active workable area, a distinctly slimmer and lighter form factor, and a new customisable ExpressKey Remote Control which can be placed on your tablet or on your desk for more flexible working.

Options:

Buy Wacom Cintiq 13HD here – £575 (£690 inc VAT)

Buy Wacom Cintiq 22HD Pen-only display here – £1224 (£1468.80 inc VAT)

Buy Wacom Cintiq 27QHD Pen-only display here – £1455 (£1746 inc VAT)

Buy Wacom Cintiq 27QHD Pen & Touch display here – £1832 (£2198.40 inc VAT)

 

The high-end pen display: Wacom Cintiq Pro

Go for this if… You want the most sensitive creative pen display around.

wacom_cintiq_pro

The Wacom Cintiq Pro comes in two sizes: the Wacom Cintiq Pro 13, which has a 13.3″ display, and the Wacom Cintiq Pro 16, which very logically has a 15.6″ one. Both are compatible with Mac and PC computers, and can connect via USB-C, or via Mini DisplayPort and USB using an adaptor (which Wacom kindly include with the tablet so you don’t have to fork out twice).

The display is a sleek edge-to-edge etched glass surface, which leads to a slimmer, swisher design and a more realistic ‘pen on paper’ feel. The 13″ model has an HD screen while the 16″ has a 4K resolution one, and they’re colour accurate for 87% and 94% of Adobe RGB respectively.

Like the Intuos Pro and Intuos Paper Edition, the Cintiq Pro ships with the ridiculously sensitive Wacom Pro Pen 2, which boasts 8192 levels of pressure sensitivity, tilt support and virtually no lag.

The Cintiq Pro has a built-in kick stand, and an optional Wacom Stand with three levels of elevation is available for anyone who wants more flexibility. There are no on-tablet ExpressKeys, but anyone who prefers physical buttons to the Cintiq’s touchscreen controls can invest in a Wacom ExpressKey Remote.

Options:

Buy the Wacom Cintiq Pro 13 here – £699 ex VAT (£838.80 inc VAT)

Buy the Wacom Cintiq Pro 16 here – £1166 ex VAT (£1399.20 inc VAT)

 

Got a question? Call us on 03332 409 306 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com to find out more about the different models from Wacom available or the best graphics tablet for your creative workflow. For everything else, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Canon debuts the EOS 5D Mark IV

Canon debuts the EOS 5D Mark IV

Canon today debuts the eagerly-anticipated EOS 5D Mark IV, the newest addition to the legendary EOS 5D family, designed for photographers on a quest to capture the perfect shot. Early reviews are positive, including this one from the good people of DP Review

Renowned for enabling people to tell the stories that need to be told, the EOS 5D series has captured many of the world’s most significant moments in history. As successor to the EOS 5D Mark III, the camera has been designed using first-hand feedback from the photographic community to create the most versatile EOS model yet.

Featuring a 30.4 megapixel CMOS sensor with wide exposure latitude, 7 frames per second (fps) high speed shooting, internal 4K movie recording and built-in WiFi and GPS, the camera fuses speed and resolution with excellent low light capability and movie functionality.

The EOS 5D Mark IV is also the first EOS camera to premiere the innovative Dual Pixel RAW file format, allowing photographers to fine-tune images in post-production by adjusting or correcting the point of sharpness, shifting the foreground bokeh or reducing image ghosting.

To work hand-in-hand with the camera, Canon today also introduces two new high performance L-series lenses; the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM and EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM.

EOS 5D Mark IV key features include: 

– 30.4 megapixel CMOS sensor with high exposure latitude.
– Engineered to perform with the innovative Dual Pixel CMOS AF and Dual Pixel RAW.
– Step up to cinematic 4K with DCI 4K up to 30p.
– Stay connected with Built-in WiFi, NFC and GPS.

EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM key features:

– Versatile 24-105mm zoom range.
– Constant f/4 max aperture.
– L-series weatherproof construction.
– 4-stop image stabiliser.
– Advanced optical construction.

EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM key features:
– Versatile collection of wide-angle focal lengths.
– Premium image quality.
– Fast, constant f/2.8 aperture.
– Durable L-series construction.
– Advanced autofocus.

The EOS 5D Mark IV will be available as a body-only kit from 8th September, and the lenses will join it in October.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

What’s so exciting about Anova PRO?

What’s so exciting about Anova PRO?

Rotolight’s new LED studio/location light (an update of 2013’s Anova) has location shooters all a-twitter thanks to its 10% weight reduction, 43% jump in brightness and its potential to help rolling shutter cameras handle stroboscopic light. 

LED lights have been gaining momentum for a while now, and one of the best received was Rotolight’s Anova, which brightened our 2013 considerably. This year’s update, the Anova PRO, was a big hit at NAB, not in the least because it’s 10% lighter. This has gotten a big thumbs up from the ENG section of the Anova user base, as exemplified by the good folks at NewsShooter, who got a good look at the PRO at NAB:

 

Anova PRO: key specs

As well as being easier to lug around, the Anova PRO has 720 LEDs compared to the Anova’s 576. That 25% jump in the number of LEDs translates into a 43% brighter light, with an output of 6545 Lux and three feet. The colour temperature is tuneable from 3150 Kelvin to 6300 Kelvin and it has a fifty degree beam angle.

As well as these excellent specs, it comes with four excitingly-named features of Rotolight’s own design, namely:

CINE SFX mode. This equips your Anova PRO with a series of effects you can deploy on set or location in order to imitate, say, a roaring fire, a flickering television, a welding torch and several other things that have historically made rolling shutter cameras very unhappy indeed. (The official list appears to be: strobe, lightning, fire, cycle, throb, police, TV, spin, weld, spark, film, neon and gunshot.)

Flash Sync. Flash Sync lets you integrate the Anova PRO into your photography workflow, using your Anova PRO as a strobe and meaning you only need one set of lights to shoot stills and video.

True Aperture Dimming. This feature allows you to accurately calculate and display the correct aperture for your subject at any distance, meaning you no longer need to meter.

Designer Fade. This mode gives you custom fade up/fade down effects, so that you can capture those in camera rather than having to add them in post.

You can order yourself an Anova Pro here. Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Chasing auroras: An interview with photographer Jamen Percy

Chasing auroras: An interview with photographer Jamen Percy

Jamen Percy is an international, award-winning photographer, designer and Adobe Stock contributor (check out his Stock portfolio here). He’s also got a bit of a thing for the Northern Lights, winning Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015: Aurorae Category and setting up his own Arctic Circle photo tour group, Aurora Chasers (see more on Jamen’s Instagram). We quizzed him on his photography workflow, selling for stock services and why you shouldn’t get between a mother bear and her cubs… 

Jamen Percy

How did you first get into photography? 

I was at the ripe old age of 26 when I was in need of a fresh change in my life, so I relocated from my home town in Sydney to London. There I soon became addicted to travelling abroad and this gave me that extra reason to invest in a proper SLR camera. The two went in hand, and it was wanderlust at first sight.

What kind of work and styles do you specialise in? 

I cover quite a variety of subject matter – I started with travel, specialising in the Aurora Borealis up in the Arctic circle, but then branched out as my lust for wildlife and nature adventures exponentially expanded. I would then do small studio shots in my London home for technique practice, which also helped pay for all the gear I ‘just had to have’ for my next trip.

Jamen Percy Aurora Borealis

What’s been the hardest shoot you’ve been on?

Every subject is hard – if it’s easy, then it’s not worth it. You can bet many other people have done the same if it’s too easy. When it gets hard, you know you’re on to something good. It’s also when most people give up. In terms of stock photography, a unique picture is key. I love shooting wildlife and, although it’s not as profitable for stock as other subjects, I enjoy it so much it never feels like work to me.

Jamen Percy brown bear

The hardest shoot so far would have to be brown bears in the forests of Finland. Their behavior is so unpredictable; you can’t just come out of your hide and give them some creative direction. They are tough models to work with! Although they aren’t aggressive if they do see you, if you come between a mother and her cubs you won’t come out on top. It makes toilet breaks outside the hide interesting…

Jamen Percy brown bear and cub

You’ve shot some amazing pictures of the Aurora Borealis too – how was that?

Very cold! It’s extreme conditions and it can be very hard to chase them as the weather seems to be against you 95% of the time. But, that 5% is always worth it, even if you can’t feel your toes or hands and it’s 4am. It’s never the same and always awe-inspiring.

Do you have a photography Moby Dick you’re still on the hunt for?

Yes, there’s a list! Working with wildlife is a game of patience and persistence. I have a project in Central America photographing one of the world’s most elusive predators – wild jaguars. It’s been going for three years now, still with no shot yet, but I know it will come. And when it does…

So what’s in your kit bag? And what non-techy item are you never without on a shoot?

I’ve gone from owning every lens possible to having just the bare essentials. For day to day use, I have a super wide-Carl Zeiss 15mm lens, then an all-rounder Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L II, followed by the Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 L II. This gives me a full range and I rarely need anything else unless it’s really specific – telephoto or fisheye, for example – and for that I would hire the lens out. In terms of non-tech, I always have a soft cloth for cleaning the lens and a chocolate bar to keep my energy levels up. If you get tired and hungry you can’t focus and get lazy – photography can be surprisingly physical.

Jamen Percy

Can you describe your workflow for us?

I load my images straight into Lightroom, where I do a quick pass marking the ones worth keeping and deleting the rest, which usually reduces the collection to 25% of the original amount. From there I apply an overall lens correction and adjustments, then I go through each image and make local adjustments and tweaks to the lighting. By then I can usually spot the favourites and I keyword and export them to be uploaded. I try to avoid uploading similar images to keep my portfolio to a high standard.

Do you use any other editing tools such as Photoshop?

I only use Photoshop to do studio shoots where I remove infrastructure and tools used to position the subjects, combining images or changing colours of objects. Most of my photos stay in Lightroom though. It now has so many more features that I don’t need third party software for panoramic and such like I used to. I also use Adobe After Effects to compile timelapses.

Jamen_Percy_Aurora

You do a lot of stock imagery work – how do you decide what to give over to stock services?

If I think it will sell on Adobe Stock, then I will submit it, otherwise the photo will sit on my hard drive and cost money rather than make it. However, context does apply to stock – some images will sell at high prices as art prints but never sell at all on Adobe Stock – these tend to be more creative visions which are too abstract to sell commercially but highly prized as unique in the art world. It’s all about finding the right audience for each image.

Jamen Percy

So is there a balance between what you think will be commercially successful and still retaining your style?

No never, but I seem to always get some of my style in each photograph, regardless of the subject matter. I will photograph anything that will sell, as soulless as its sounds – the image selling industry has become so hardline for making money you cannot afford to exclude anything and often the subjects people don’t want to photograph are in demand because of this. You can always use different aliases to separate your portfolio into styles with most stock libraries however. Also, having a good variety of work will increase your opportunities. Every subject matter is a challenge and has lessons to learn.

What kind of thing do you receive the most interest in?

My timelapses and photos of the Aurora Borealis have always outsold any of my other work. To get all the conditions right for a good shoot can take many seasons to crack, as well as the aurora coming in 11-year cycles of strength, so for 5 years there are almost no chances to photograph strong activity – which adds to its rareness.

Do you have any advice you can give to up and coming photographers?

Always be unique if you want to sell. If you don’t, you’re just adding to the pollution.

Check out more of Jamen’s great work on his Instagram, and over in his Adobe Stock portfolio.

Want to find out more about Adobe Stock? Head on over to our Adobe Stock page to take a look at the full feature-set. You can also give us a call on 03332 409 259, email adobe@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below.

Introducing EIZO ColorEdge CG2420 and CS2420

Introducing EIZO ColorEdge CG2420 and CS2420

EIZO has added two new 24” monitors to its professional ColorEdge range – the CG2420 and CS2420. Both units have resolutions of 1920×1200, an IPS non-glare panel, and ensure smooth gradations with 10-bit display from a 16-bit look up table.

EIZO ColorEdge is great for photographers, allowing users to accurately simulate their finished product, cutting out the need for later revisions and confusion down the line. In the long run, this saves both time and money.

The CG2420 and CS2420 feature new, sleek cabinet designs with slim bezels, making them 39% smaller than their predecessors. A carrying handle is built in for improved manoeuvrability, and electrostatic switches replace traditional buttons for seamless access to monitor settings.

CG2420

– The CG2420 is a professional grade display ideal for use in photography, design, print, and post production.

– For anyone who knows the ColorEdge range this essentially replaces the CX241, but offers enhanced features such as high contrast panel, slimmer design and self-calibration sensor.

– It sits just under the CG247, which offers the best subtle tone due to its 3D LUT and self-calibration sensor which measures full tone as well as chroma.

– Key features include 99% coverage Adobe RGB, 98% coverage DCI-P3, self-calibration sensor, high contrast ratio of 1500:1, delta-E difference of 3 or less across the screen, stable colour in just three minutes, and bundled ColorNavigator software and shading hood.

The CG2420 is available now from Jigsaw24 for £958 exVAT.

CS2420 

– The CS2420 is the entry level display in the ColorEdge range; ideal for hobbyists and prosumers working in photography and illustration.

– For anyone who knows the ColorEdge range this essentially replaces the CS240 and comes with a new sleeker cabinet design.

– It lacks the brightness stabilization and self-correction sensor of the CS230 but has a wide colour gamut.

– Key features include 99% coverage Adobe RGB, high contrast ratio of 1000:1, uniformity controls and bundled ColorNavigator software.

The CS2420 is shipping soon.

Want to know more about the EIZO lineup? Get in touch with the team on 03332 409 306 or email displays@Jigsaw24.comFor all the latest news and tips follow us on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

How does Adobe Stock stack up?

How does Adobe Stock stack up?

Wondering whether or not it’s time for you to switch to Adobe Stock? Sick of hearing us banging on about the incredibly awesome workflow benefits that come with the integration into Adobe Creative Cloud for teams? OK, well how about some cold hard facts to help you make up your mind about how Adobe Stock stacks up against your current provider?

Here’s a quick guide that pits Adobe Stock against the big boys: iStock, Shutterstock, Bigstock and depositphotos.

Who has the most assets?

While I’ve always been told it’s quality not quantity, if you’re drawing blanks and want something to inspire you, having plenty of images to look through is always a bonus. But how do the stock providers compare to each other?

Adobe Stock – Adobe Stock has 45 million assets and counting. Since it’s launch in autumn last year, an additional 5 million have already been added to the pot! 

Big Stock – Despite the name, this is by no means the largest library on the list, with a relatively respectable 32 million assets.

depositphotos – While we’ve struggled to get a definitive number for this one, the last source we can find put this at about 12+ million items, making it the second smallest on the list.

iStock – Last reported, iStock had about 10+ million assets on its books, making it the smallest stock provider on the list.

Shutterstock – Definitely one of the largest databases on file, it has over 70 million stock assets. 

Verdict: While Adobe Stock doesn’t have the largest number of assets within its library, it is by no means the smallest, and is a big jump for anyone using iStock, depositphotos or Big Stock.

What assets are available?

Of course, it’s not all about imagery. Many stock websites also offer video and audio for more complete multimedia provision.

Imagery – As expected, all of the providers on the list offer creative and editorial imagery. Well, you’d hope so…

Illustrations and vector images – Illustrations and vectors aren’t always a given on stock services, but depositphotos, Big Stock, iStock, Shutterstock and Adobe Stock all include both though.

Video – Another big area for stock services is video. Adobe Stock has only recently added it to its arsenal, and all of the other providers on the list are advocates.

Audio – Audio is always a bit of a wild card for stock services and, of the full list, iStock and Shutterstock are the only ones to include it.

Verdict: For the most part, all of the services are fairly evenly weighted. Just bear in mind that if you’re after audio, then only iStock and Shutterstock are viable options. Adobe Stock is a good option for the non-audiophiles out there.

Who has the best assets? The zebra test…

In case you hadn’t noticed, the Jigsaw24 mascot is the elegant animal that is the zebra. Naturally, we find ourselves looking out for the very best zebra photography all the time. So how do the different stock providers look in terms of their zebra libraries?

depositphotos – A search on here returned 16,162 photos. Unlike others on the list, there’s much more of an emphasis on masked images of zebras on white backgrounds, and those that are photos aren’t always of the highest quality.

 deposit photos – the zebra test

Big Stock – Another with a focus on natural photography. The quality of the images is nice, although considering this has the fewest results (13,335 in total) a lot of the assets seem to be variations of the same image. Also, note that the search doesn’t seem to be able to distinguish between a zebra and a zebra crossing.

 Big stock – the zebra test

iStock – Now powered by Getty Images, it’s interesting that iStock returns very different results. A total of 18,133 assets for a search of ‘zebra’ with quite a nice mix of decent photography, zebras on white backgrounds and the odd quirky image thrown in.

 iStock – the zebra test

Shutterstock – The largest number of results came from Shutterstock, with a whopping 33,662 images! Quality is a mixed bag overall, with plenty of stylised photos as well as plenty you wouldn’t look twice at.

 Shutter stock – the zebra test

Adobe Stock – Like iStock, Adobe Stock has a nice mixture of assets and returns 18,786 results, making it the third largest in quantity. Oddly, Adobe Stock seems to return a large number of other objects (rhinos, birds, cake…) masquerading as zebras.

Adobe Stock – the zebra test 

Verdict: They all have their own specialities which makes it difficult to directly compare, but when it comes to variation and range Shutterstock, iStock and Adobe Stock come up trumps.

Which is the most expensive? 

It’s the all-important question and ultimately what helps sway the decision in many businesses, so what’s the difference in price?

First off, a slight caveat in that direct comparisons between different stock providers can be difficult because of the sheer number of options out there. However, for the purposes of this piece, we’re approaching it from the angle of needing an annual subscription for a team with a standard licence.

iStock – iStock only advertise for single users, and for a team subscription you would be looking at a higher cost. Their pricing is split between ‘Essentials’ subscriptions (which includes basic images only) and ‘Signature’ subscriptions (which includes access to all imagery.). For an annual Signature subscription, you can get 50 images per month for £119 (£2.38 per image) up to 750 images per month for £199.92 (27p per image).

Shutterstock – Shutterstock do offer team packages, with prices increasing as the number of users does. For a team of two users, they offer a 750 images per month package for £179 (24p per image).

Big Stock – Unfortunately there’s no mention of a teams package or an annual subscription, but monthly packages are available. For 25 images per month it’s £45 (£1.80 per image), and there are options up to 200 images per month for £112 (56p per image).

depositphotos – Team packages are available with an annual subscription through depositphotos. For 50 images it’s £51 per month (£1.02 per image) and options are available up to 500 images per month for £171 (34p per image).

Adobe Stock – The big thing to bear in mind here are that pooled imagery amongst teams does not cost more with Adobe Stock, so there’s no increase price as your team grows. A 10 image per month subscription will set you back £20 per month (equivalent to £2 per image). For 750 images per month, it’s £120 per month (or 16p per image).

Verdict: Adobe Stock is the clear winner in price when looking at team subscriptions. Ultimately, across all three services, the more images you’re buying the cheaper it’s going to be, but in terms of cost per image, Adobe Stock is the most cost-effective.

And one more thing… productivity

Stock imagery and productivity might sound like an odd combination, but the fact is that where Adobe Stock is in a very unique position is in its integration with your Creative Cloud applications. As well as being able to search for imagery directly within the app without having to jump back to the Adobe website, preview images can be saved and manipulated within your projects, then when it comes to buying the final version, you hit a button and it swaps out the preview for the final high res image, retaining any adjustments you made to the preview. Basically, it eradicates the need to duplicate work, so in theory, Adobe Stock makes you twice as fast.

And in regards the other stock providers? Oh, is that tumbleweed we see…

Buy Adobe Stock at Jigsaw24

Want to find out more about Adobe Stock? Head on over to our Adobe Stock page to take a look at the full feature-set. You can also give us a call on 03332 409 259, email adobe@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below.

*Prices correct at the time of writing.

Get a unique point of view with Yuneec drones

Get a unique point of view with Yuneec drones

It seems these days that drones are popping up in every aspect of our lives, whether we’re exploring abandoned theme parks or simply ordering our online grocery shopping. Now, with Yuneec’s range of clever drones, they’re even following us as we carve out wicked downhill bike trails.

Or so the Yuneec Typhoon H’s unveiling at CES 2016 showed, as a mountain biker careered around an on-stage course followed and filmed agonisingly closely by the drone, at one point even dodging a falling tree. Crazy stuff. You see, Yuneec’s Typhoon H has Intel’s RealSense technology integrated into its brains, which helps it sense and avoid obstacles while in flight.

Just check out the CES launch video below and then try and tell us you don’t need this drone in your life…

And here’s the official product vid from Yuneec…

Yuneec Typhoon G

Admit it, you’re thinking about buying a drone, aren’t you? Luckily, we have the Yuneec Typhoon G is available for you to buy right now from Jigsaw24. For anyone into extreme sports, or looking to get a unique aerial shot in their photography, the Yuneec Typhoon G is ideal. It’s completely compatible with GoPro cameras, so if you’re already shooting with one, you’re ready to go – just hook up your GoPro to the Typhoon G using the clever gimbal for incredibly stable imaging from the skies. It gives you:

– Up to 25 minutes flight time.

– Personal Ground Station with built-in touchscreen.

– 3-axis precision gimbal for GoPro.

– Up to 400m direct digital video down link.

– Dedicated App compatible with GoPro.

– SteadyGrip for GoPro to capture stable footage on the ground.

Yuneec Drones on Jigsaw24

Want to know more about Yuneec drones? Give us a call on 03332 409 306, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or just pop your details in the form below and we’ll be in touch. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

A Day in the Life of: Scene Photography

A Day in the Life of: Scene Photography

In the first of a new ‘Day in the Life’ series on creatives and creative agencies from around the UK, we go behind the scenes at Nottingham-based studio Scene Photography. Check out the video below for an insight into Rob and Karen Smalley’s creative workflow, and the tools they’re using to help boost productivity.

Throughout our Day in the Life series, we’ll be calling round at other creatives, including graphic design and web design agencies, and more, so you can see some of the great work others in the industry are getting up to, and how they’re making the most of the latest creative tools.

Want to know more? Call 03332 409 306, email design@Jigsaw24.com, head on over to our Design & Publishing home page and don’t forget to check out our Adobe Creative Cloud page for resources, and updates on all your favourite Adobe apps. For all the latest news and tips follow us on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Canon unveil 5 new cameras, including 760D and 750D

Canon unveil 5 new cameras, including 760D and 750D

Canon are clearly in a generous mood today, choosing to reveal not one, not six, but five new cameras to the giddy public. The EOS 760D, 750D, 5DS, 5DS R and M3 will be available in the spring, but you can get all the key specs here, now…

EOS 5DS and 5DS R

The leading lights here are this pair of ultra high resolution full frame DSLRs with dual DIGIC 6 processors, due to grace our warehouse in June 2015. Offering you a frankly ridiculous 50.6MP to play with, these are going to be released alongside the new EF 11-24mm f/4L USM lens, “the world’s widest angle rectilinear zoom lens” and “the perfect companion for landscape and architecture photographers”, so I guess we know who these are aimed at.

Anyway, the 5DS and 5DS R combine that 50.6MP CMOS sensor with ISO 100-6400 sensitivity, expandable to 50-12,800. That massive resolution also allows three new in-camera cropping modes: 1.3x, 1.6x and 1:1. These are visible through the viewfinder and promise fairly spectacular results – an image you crop at 1:6x is still going to be over 19MP.

Those dual DIGIC 6 processors are designed to handle the huge amount of information coming from the sensor, reducing image noise and allowing you to shoot at up to five frames per second. The cameras also boast a 61-point autofocus system with 41 cross-type points, EOS Intelligent Tracking for tackling moving subjects and iTR facial recognition autofocus. Canon have also included their Mirror Vibration Control System, which uses cams to drive the cameras’ mirrors up and down in a more controlled fashion, avoiding sudden stops and gently softening your shutter sound. Oh, and if that wasn’t enough, they also have flicker detection to ensure continuous exposure under artificial lights.

Further innovations prompted by that truly massive sensor include a new Fine Detail Picture style, which maximises the level of detail you can achieve and enables sharpness adjustments without any need for editing software.

The EOS 5DS body only camera will set you back £2999.99 come June, while an EOS 5DS R will be £3199.99 ex VAT and an EF 12-44mm f/4L USM will cost you a neat 2799.99 ex VAT and will be available from March.

Canon 760D and 750D

These beauties come with a 24.2 megapixel sensor and Canon’s DIGIC 6 image processor. If you’re the sort who’s often shooting in less than ideal conditions, you’ll be pleased to hear that they have an ISO range of 100-12,800 and the same flicker detection technology as the EOS 7D MkII, so your images will have consistent exposure, even under artificial light. You’re also supported by a 19-point autofocus system. Once you’ve taken your perfectly exposed, expertly focused photo, you can share it via WiFi or NFC directly from the camera.

Video-wise, the 750D and 760D are both compatible with STM lenses, can both shoot Full HD in mp4 format, and support Hybrid CMOS AF III autofocus so that you can track and swap focus while shooting video. However, the 760D has additional ‘creative movie modes’ which make it easier to achieve tilt-shift and HDR looks, among others.

The new EOS models are designed to be more ergonomic and easy to control (you have full manual control of the camera), with a rear control dial, top LCD panel and an intelligent viewfinder where you can review your settings and images.

The 760D will be with us in April, and will be available as a body-only camera costing £649.99 ex VAT. The 750D should appear at the same time, in both a £599.99 ex VAT body-only form and as a £689.99 bundle with a EF-S 18-55mm IS STM lens. Some other lenses will be eligible for cashback deals when purchased with either camera, but we’re yet to hear exactly which ones.

EOS M3

If you feel like the 5DS and 760D are slightly out of your league, there’s always the EOS M3, which Canon say offers “the power of EOS, only smaller.” Aimed mainly at consumers but potentially just sneaking into usefulness for some of you, it offers you the chance to get to grips with Canon’s first 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor, combined with a DIGIC 6 processor.

It has ISO 100-12800 sensitivity and a 49-point autofocus system based on the same Hybrid CMOS technology as the 760D’s, so you’ll be able to focus up to 6.1 times faster than some poor schmoe using an original EOS M. It comes with a 7.5cm/3″ viewfinder than can be tilted to anywhere between 45 and 180 degrees, a hot shoe for camera-mounted lights or tilt-type viewfinders.

The M3 can record Full HD video to mp4 at 24p, 25p, and 30p frame rates, all with support for continuous autofocus. There’s even a Touch AF feature that allows you to tap focus points on the touchscreen LCD display and then use them to shoot focus pulls. Once you’ve mastered the fine art of the M3 focus pull, you can share the results using on-board WiFi and NFC to share images or back them up to Canon’s cloud storage service.

The M3 will be joining us in March and cost £599.99.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.