A look back at the last quarter century of creative technology

A look back at the last quarter century of creative technology

We’re celebrating our 25th year providing products that help everyone from studio managers to graphic designers to video producers stay productive and creative. As part of the festivities, we’re going retro and taking the plunge into a nostalgia pool filled with Zip drives, beige Power Macs, primitive social networks, old school design apps and more! 

Creation and innovation can be a tough business, but it’s worth it. A quarter century of hard work has led to countless milestone moments and tech developments. See for yourself how far we’ve come…

1992

– Roger Whittle founds Jigsaw24. The colour orange is never the same again.

– Animation gains a new dimension as classic horror game Alone in the Dark introduces us all to the joys of 3D polygon character animation, traumatising at least one member of the team so badly that they give up gaming forever.

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– Neil Papworth wishes Richard Jarvis “Merry Christmas” in the first ever SMS message.

1993

– The PDF is born (this may well be the least cool entry on the list, but the ‘compare document’ feature in the latest version of Acrobat DC is a lifesaver, and the new editing toolkit is properly brilliant).

– The internet is born. Cats everywhere shudder but don’t know why…

– NVIDIA is founded; gamers swear by their high-powered GPUs to this day.

1994

– American telecoms company AT&T run the first ever internet ad banner campaign. A single bead of sweat trickles down the forehead of every person working in the print business.

– Photoshop 3.0 is released and introduces the world to layers.

– Iomega’s Zip drive is released.

ZIP_Drive_100_

– Apple launch their ‘Serious Business Computer’ ad, which we strongly urge you to watch:

1995

– JavaScript is released. Jamie, our Web Designer, says “JavaScript is crucial to web and non-web projects and it’s hard to imagine working without it. But the range of libraries can be baffling, so I prefer React and Angular.”

– Sony releases the first PlayStation, beginning an epidemic of vitamin D deficiency in children.

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– Coca-Cola’s iconic Christmas truck advert airs for the first time. All together now: “Holidays are coming, holidays are coming…”

1996

– The first CSS specification is published.

1997

– Apple encourage us to Think Different for the first time; science responds by cloning Dolly the sheep.

– IBM’s Deep Blue defeats chess champ Garry Kasparov. We know we’re not an IBM outfit, but credit where it’s due.

– Google domain name is registered. We could not have compiled this list without it, so feel compelled to include it.

original_google_homepage

1998

– Wacom release the first Intuos tablet. There is much rejoicing. Graphic Designer Liana says “I remember getting my first job and being amazed by Wacom. I’d spent all of my time at uni huddled over an 11” MacBook, trying to do everything on the Touchpad, which obviously has nothing on a nice big Wacom.”

– First ever Google Doodle. Bit rubbish, to be honest.

– HDTV is introduced. Everyone becomes picture quality snobs.

1999

– The mighty Nikon D1 becomes the first DSLR to challenge the market supremacy of film cameras.

– Budweiser asks “Wassup?”

2000

– Post-apocalyptic horrors promised during the Y2K Panic fail to materialise.

– Everyone buys a Nokia 3310.

– Sony launches PlayStation 2, the best-selling video game console ever.

2001

– Apple launch iTunes and OS X, ushering us into the modern era of Mac.

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– Microsoft remove that Paperclip thing from Office. It is not missed.

– Wikipedia is launched. Students everywhere are elated, and nobody wins an internet debate ever again.

2002

– InDesign becomes the first ever Mac-native desktop publishing tool.

– Gartner calculate that one billion personal computers have been sold since their arrival in the 70s.

2003

– The first ever Creative Suite is released, including the all-new Premiere Pro.

– The Dalsa Origin becomes the first commercially available 4K camera.

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– Skype is launched, making video conferencing several thousand times easier.

2004

– Facebook beings its journey to world domination. People Poke each other.

– MySpace arrives, and manages to trick a generation of teenagers into learning HTML by letting you customise your profile.

myspace_home_2004

– Motorola release the Razr V3 flip phone. It’s really thin.

2005

– Adobe launch Creative Suite 2, featuring Smart Objects.

– The first YouTube video is released. Elephants’ trunks are really cool.

– Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle becomes the first film released on Blu-ray.

2006

– The .gif standard becomes freely available, making written language obsolete and neatly dividing the world into gifsayers and jifsayers.

– Jack Dorsey sends the first ever tweet (and is too edgy for vowels):

2007

– iPhone arrives, and promptly shifts 1.4 million units in its first year.

Apple_iPhone_1st_Gen

– CS3 arrives, meaning you can finally use Photoshop on a modern Mac without having to go through Rosetta.

– Cadbury rehabilitate Phil Collins’ image with their classic drumming gorilla ad, which none of us can believe is really ten years old.

2008

– Nikon’s D90 is the first DSLR to introduce video recording.

nikon_d90_1

– Artist Shepard Fairey creates the iconic Barack Obama ‘Hope’ poster.

2009

– James Cameron’s Avatar becomes the highest-grossing film of all time.

– Microsoft launches Windows 7, sealing the fate of Vista.

2010

– iPad is released.

– The first commercially available jet pack is launched.

2011

– Adobe introduce Content-Aware tools.

– Wacom introduce the Cintiq 24HD. It weighs as much as a not-so-small child, but we all want one anyway.

– The number of Apple devices sold in this one year is larger than the total number of Macs sold ever. We imagine a lot of people spent this year frantically working out how to make their website responsive.

– Steve Jobs passes away aged 56.

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2012

– The final boxed version of Creative Suite, CS6, is released, which we mention only because our marketing team won a prize for their campaign and have been insufferable ever since.

– Jony Ive gets a knighthood; rumour has it he commented witheringly on the maximalist design of the medal.

– The Hobbit is the first movie filmed at 48 fps. Viewers suffer eyestrain.

– The world doesn’t end. In your face, Mayans.

2013

– Kenneth Grange scores a knighthood, joining Ive as Britain’s most decorated designer.

– Adobe launch Creative Cloud.

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– Film Gravity uses the most complex lighting setup in film history, using a custom-built light box with 1.8 million high-powered LEDs to film zero-gravity footage.

2014

– YouTube announce that they receive 100 hours of new video content per minute.

2015

– Windows 10 is launched, if you’re into that sort of thing.

2016

– Mobile browsing overtakes desktop for the first time.

– Harambe the gorilla dies and is memorialised forever in meme form.

2017

– Carter Wilkinson makes a plea to Wendy’s for a year’s worth of free chicken nuggets. It becomes the most retweeted tweet of all time, currently standing at over 3.5 million.

– Twitter shut down online video service Vine. At least it lasted longer than its videos.

– Jigsaw24 turn 25; immediately has crisis about logo.

If you’d like to find out more about about contemporary creative kit, give us a call on 03332 400 888, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Need tech training on Mac? Our macOS Core Essentials course is for you

Need tech training on Mac? Our macOS Core Essentials course is for you

If you’re deploying Mac in your business, but your tech team are more Windows whizzes than Mac management maestros, it always helps to get a bit of guidance on how the new system differs, in the form of technical training. 

So we’ve developed our macOS Core Essentials training course just for that. Run by our friendly systems engineers, who have bags of real world experience managing Mac in business environments of various size, it’s the ideal way to make sure your tech team understand the core functionality behind macOS, how best to manage it, and how it compares to similar Windows environments, so your business can get the most from your system.

Who’s it for? Our macOS Core Essentials training is for helpdesk teams, technical co-ordinators, service techs, ICT technicians etc who are deploying macOS for the first time. It’s designed to help technicians who are familiar with Windows systems to master the key functionality of macOS and understand Apple’s technical terminology where it differs from Windows standards.

What does it include? The training will include demos of Apple hardware and software, plus a deep dive look at supporting macOS devices delivered by a senior systems engineer from Jigsaw24. If you’re managing your Apple devices using Jamf Pro, we can also provide an overview of how these will work to manage your devices, and what you need to know to get devices profiled, managed and working with your other internal systems.

As well as being accredited by Apple, our engineers have practical experience designing and supporting mixed platform enterprise environments, so can advise on how to address real world issues you’re likely to find in your environment. You can see the full course curriculum here.

Who’s running it? It’s all delivered by our senior systems engineers. As well as being accredited by Apple, our engineers have practical experience designing and supporting mixed platform enterprise environments, so can advise on how to address real world issues you’re likely to find in your environment.

Where does it happen? This is an all day session, and can be held at our Nottingham or London offices (where we’ll provide lunch), or at your place (in which case you’ll need to bring sandwiches).

How much does it cost? £350 per person (minimum booking three people).

– Want to book your team onto our macOS Core Essentials training course? Get in touch on the details below… 

Want to know more about our Apple training? Get in touch with the team on 03332 409 306 or email solutions@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Why choose Jigsaw24’s Apple training courses for business?

Why choose Jigsaw24’s Apple training courses for business?

Whether you’re a whizz with Mac computers and iOS device deployments, or a complete newcomer to Apple hardware and software, a little training (or a quick refresher) never goes amiss. So we’ve put together a catalogue of Apple training courses designed for end users and tech admin staff within businesses – all hosted by Apple-accredited trainers and certified Apple technicians – to make sure you’re up to speed with the latest versions of Apple operating systems, and the techie stuff behind it all… 

How do these benefit my business?

Our Apple training programmes are tailored for every business type and every level of staff, from executives to sales staff to technical teams. If your end users are just making the move from PC to Mac, we have introductory courses that will get them acclimatised with the user interface culture shock, and user experience workflow including iCloud and the like, as well as get them moving from Microsoft Office apps like PowerPoint to using Apple’s own powerful Keynote software.

For technical staff, we’ll take the guesswork out of iOS and macOS, going deep into how to manage devices using mobile device management (MDM) solutions like Jamf Pro, and all-round support for IT staff, including everything from troubleshooting to cross-platform integration.

As each of our training courses are run by experts with years of training supporting Apple systems in the wild, you know you’re getting relatable real world advice and support (all from a friendly face). In essence, each course will help you:

– Get the most from your Mac, iPad and iPhone, receiving the full Apple experience.

– Learn best practice at the same time as colleagues, leading to safer, more uniform IT usage that stays in line with company policies.

– Mitigate the dip in productivity that usually happens when you switch to a new system.

– Remove the need to hire new support staff, as your in-house team will already be clued up on the key technical aspects of Mac and iPad.

– Ensure you get advice on real world scenarios from our experienced engineers, rather than generic training from someone who’s not in the field.

– Get to grips with MDM, VPP, DEP and Jamf Pro.

Sharan Matharu, Assistant Principal at Sidney Stringer Academy, had this to say about our Apple training: “A week after the training, people are still coming up to me saying, ‘Thank you. I was really apprehensive about the training initially, I used my iPad for email and that was it, but now I feel much more confident.”

Sidney Stringer Apple Training 2

What courses are available?

For end users…

User experience: This is designed to help end users get the most out of their existing Apple devices by getting everyone familiar with the latest features in iOS and macOS, as well as teaching people to sync devices, set up iCloud, and work on iWork and Office documents on all their Apple devices.

Moving to Mac from PC: If you’re introducing Mac computers into your organisation for the first time, this training will show end users how to perform all their day to day tasks on a Mac, familiarising them with the UI, key functions and key apps.

Keynote for iPad or Mac: In this course, you’ll get to grips with using Keynote for iPad or Mac, and why it’s so perfect for business. Learn how to create visually engaging, clearly organised and personally expressive presentations, and develop strategies to share and collaborate.

iPad or Mac skills for business: This course is all about developing iPad or Mac skills specifically for a business environment. You’ll identify and explore the fundamentals and features of your iPad or Mac, and learn how to personalise iPad or Mac settings and use built-in apps for business.

For tech teams… 

iOS core essentials: This course is for small groups of helpdesk specialists, technical coordinators, service technicians and others who support iOS users. It is aimed at ICT technicians who deploy and manage Apple iOS devices. We can also offer specific training on your organisation’s chosen MDM solution, such as Jamf Pro.

OS X core essentials: This training session will be conducted by a Professional Services System Engineer from Jigsaw24, and has been designed to ensure attendees understand the core functionality behind macOS, how best to manage it, and how it compares to similar Windows environments. These features will be referenced where this helps comparison to the macOS support and client management experience. We will include specific reference to the market-leading MDM solution Jamf Pro, plus OS X Server Profile Manager features.

Introducing new iterations: Before you move the office onto the next version of iOS or macOS, this course gives them the chance to work on updated machines and learn the new lay of the land. We’ll cover the changes, their benefits and how to troubleshoot them if anything goes wrong.

See full details of our Apple training courses here.

How much does it cost?

Our courses range from three hour sessions for cracking Keynote, to half or full day sessions for the more complex courses aimed at tech teams. Most can be taken either at our place in Nottingham or Soho (usually with a lunch and refreshments, as well as takeaway documents, thrown in), or round at yours. They can also be tailored to different numbers of candidates, from one user up to a group of ten. As such, pricing differs slightly, so please get in touch for a quote on our Apple training courses today!

Want to know more about our Apple training? Get in touch with the team on 03332 409 306 or email solutions@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Apple MacBook Air now comes with 8GB RAM as standard

Apple MacBook Air now comes with 8GB RAM as standard

It wasn’t just the 12″ MacBook receiving updates today: Apple have also tweaked their 13″ MacBook Air, bestowing it with 8GB RAM as standard, rather than the 4GB their base model previously shipped with (8GB was only available as a chargeable upgrade).

8GB makes the MacBook Air an even more formidable notebook, with more power to breeze through demanding tasks (8GB is the minimum requirement for most pro creative apps). Other than the RAM, it’s business as usual with the 13″ MacBook Air – there’s no change on the Broadwell CPU front, and looks-wise it keeps exactly the same classic design you’re used to. Which means, if your heart’s set on rose gold, it’s the 12″ MacBook for you…

New 13″ MacBook Air specs

– 13.3″ (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display with support for millions of colours.

– 8GB of 1600MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory.

– 1.6GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 (Turbo Boost up to 2.7GHz) with 3MB shared L3 cache.

– 128 to 256GB PCIe-based flash storage.

– 12 hours’ battery life.

– Intel HD Graphics 6000.

Want to know more about the new 13″ MacBook Air with 8GB RAM? Call us on 03332 400 888 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com, and keep up with all things Apple by liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter @WeAreJigsaw24

New faster Apple 12″ MacBook with better battery and rose gold!

New faster Apple 12″ MacBook with better battery and rose gold!

iPhone and iPad both got new models at Apple’s Spring Event, so it was only fair they gave their notebooks some time in the sun too. Step in Apple’s newly refreshed 12″ Retina MacBook, with new faster Skylake processors and improved battery life. Oh, and a new rose gold colour option to match up nicely with your iPhone.

Faster processors

Processor-wise, the new 12″ MacBook now sports Intel’s sixth-generation Skylake Core M, and range from 1.1GHz to 1.3GHz. It’s only the second Mac to benefit from Skylake after the 27″ 5K iMac last year. The memory’s had a bit of a bump too, from 1600MHz modules in the 2015 edition to 1866MHz, and the integrated graphics have also been upgraded to Intel’s more powerful 515 module for what Apple say will give 25% better performance.

Better battery

The new 12″ MacBook also promises improved battery performance, supposedly lasting up to 10 hours while browsing the web and 11 hours of continuous movie playback (this is about an hour more than the estimates for the 2015 model). That’s more than enough for the average work day or long journey!

Now in rose gold

For many customers, this is the real biggie: the 12″ MacBook is now available in the rose gold colour option to go along with the previous silver, grey and gold.

Your options

The new 2016 12″ MacBook comes with 8GB RAM as standard, 1.1-1.2GHz (1.3GHz built to order), between 256-512GB storage, and in the aforementioned range of colour options. You can order yours from Jigsaw24.com now!

Want to know more about the new Apple 12″ Retina MacBook? Call us on 03332 400 888 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com, and keep up with all things Apple by liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter @WeAreJigsaw24

Ten things every new Mac user should know

Ten things every new Mac user should know

Just got your first Mac? Wondering how to make the most of it? Too busy and important to read manuals or support documents, and just want someone to tell you ten cool things you can do to make your life easier? We’re here for you. Here are some top tips from the massive Apple nerds who populate our offices.

 1. Sort out your gestures and shortcuts

If you’re new to OS X, one of the first things you’ll notice is that your keyboard shortcuts are different, and your Track Pad/Magic Mouse responds to a strange new collection of ‘gesture controls’ that you’re more used to using on your phone. If learning a new set of shortcuts sounds like a drain on your time, mind and will to live that you’d rather avoid, try Keyboard Maestro, which allow you to remap keyboard shortcuts into your preferred positions, and BetterTouchTool, which lets you add custom gestures to your Track Pad or your Magic Mouse. You can also set up useful triggers like having your computer shut down automatically at 5.30, if you’re not as wild about unpaid overtime as we clearly are.

2. Get your folders and files in order

Noodlesoft bill Hazel as a “personal housekeeper” for your Mac, silently organising and cleaning up file and folder structures while you get on with your work. As they explain it, “Hazel watches whatever folders you tell it to, automatically organising your files according to the rules you create. It features a rule interface similar to that of Apple Mail so you should feel right at home. Have Hazel move files around based on name, date, type, what site/email address it came from (Safari and Mail only) and much more.”

That “much more” includes an App Sweep feature which makes sure that when you delete an application, all its lingering support files go with it, integration with iTunes, iPhoto and Aperture, and integration with Spotlight so you can search for files based on Hazel rules as well as the usual attributes.

Download Hazel here.

3. Get someone to remember your passwords for you

Coming up with one memorable password and using it for every site, application and system you log into is a tempting but terrible idea. Instead, try 1Password from AgileBits. This clever app automatically generates secure passwords for every account you add to it, and then stores them securely behind a “master password” that only you know. When you need to log in to a site, simply hit the 1Password icon in your browser, enter the master password, and 1Password will identify the service you’re connecting to and log you in. Best of all, it syncs between devices, so there’s no more trying to type passwords in on your phone’s tiny keyboard. Here’s a cheerful explanatory video:

Download 1Password here.

4. Find your cursor

Lost your cursor? Using OS X El Capitan? All you need to do is shake your mouse or wiggle your finger on your trackpad, and your cursor will grow to an enormous, easily findable size. So simple! So useful! (If shaking your mouse is part of your everyday working practice, you can turn off shake to find by going to System Preferences > Accessibility > Display and unticking the box marked “Shake mouse pointer to locate.”)

5. Get rid of unnecessary menus

Bartender allows you to hide, rearrange and  consolidate the apps in your menu bar, to give you a less cluttered computing experience. You can display the full menu bar, set options to have menu bar items show in the menu bar when they have updated, or have them always visible in the Bartender Bar. You can then search for menu items rather than clicking blindly through every option, use the keyboard to navigate through menus, and arrange the menu bar applications in any order you want and place the Bartender bar whenever you want. Find out more here.

6. Organise your clipboard (yes, it can be done)

Kelly Hodgkins’ rave review in Engadget was all the convincing we needed to try out Collective, a powerful clipboard manager from Generation Loss Interactive.

Collective keeps track of everything you copy and paste (it can handle hundreds of instances) and allows you to search your clipboard for any of those items, then re-copy them, remove formatting, change fonts and see full size previews of files on the clipboard. If you don’t like copying and pasting, you can give up on that keyboard shortcut entirely, and simply drag an item into Clipboard to copy it and out to paste it. This is an absolute must for anyone who’s ever spent fifteen minutes searching a server for that one graph from the one report that you definitely saw last week and which must be saved somewhere.

7. Sync tabs between devices

iCloud Tabs is a great way to keep the tabs you have open in Safari up to date on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch and Mac. Just sign into your iCloud account on all the devices you want to sync. Then on your iOS devices, head to Settings > iCloud and make sure the Safari option is turned on (it’ll be green if it is). This will allow your browser permission to beam your open tabs to your other Apple devices signed in to your iCloud.

If you want to get your Mac/OS X devices involved too, you need to go into System Preferences > Safari and make sure iCloud is turned on here. Now, as long as you’re signed in to the same iCloud account on your other devices and you’re using Safari, you can switch between reading something on your iPad to reading it on your iPhone or back to your Mac. If you close a tab on one device, it will shut it down on all your devices.

Whether you’re using Safari on a mobile or desktop device, tap the Tabs icon (the two layered rectangles) and scroll down (if necessary) to see your open iCloud Tabs. iCloud Tabs will only show the tabs that are currently open on your other Apple devices, not the tabs that are open on the device you’re currently using.

8. Learn how to record your iPad screen on a Mac

Ever since the arrival of OS X Yosemite, you’ve been able to mirror your iPad screen to your Mac and record the results. This is fantastic if you want to run through a presentation or process you have on your iPad with colleagues, as you can record everything you’re doing on screen, as well as your voiceover explaining any details, then package it up and share it as one file.

9. Learn how to recover lost drafts

Saved over a draft you wanted to keep? Need to check amends have been made correctly? With Pages’ Versions feature, it’s easy to see the previous incarnation of any of your documents. Here’s how to do it.

10. Forget all your action:searches and use natural language terms

The most recent iterations of OS X have added lots of new functionality to Spotlight, your Mac’s search facility. One particularly useful one is support for natural language searches. If you’re not comfortable building search terms like “Mac news from:Lucy” to find that update Lucy sent you, or “training kind:document” to find your notes from a training session, you can now type “emails from Lucy with attachments” or “photographs from last Tuesday”, and Spotlight uses natural language processing to figure out what you want. Having tried it out ourselves, we can report it’s surprisingly accurate and a really powerful way to search, especially if you’re scared of Boolean.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email business@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Highlights from JAMF Software’s JNUC 2015 event

Highlights from JAMF Software’s JNUC 2015 event
Our team headed to the JAMF Nation User Conference in Minneapolis last week to catch the latest news in Mac management. Hundreds of Apple IT admins packed into the Guthrie Theater for the annual event based on freely sharing IT information and best practices.
 
Over three days and dozens of sessions, there was insight from a wide range of organisations – from large and small schools to global companies – all with the common thread of enabling scalable Apple technologies at scale through creative practices, from security to deployment and management. Just a few of our highlights included:
System Integrity Protection (SIP)

here was a lot of chat at the show about System Integrity Protection (SIP), which is part of OS X El Capitan 10.11, which was interesting to hear as it’s a new direction from Apple and affects Mac admins. csrutil, NetBoot and any old packages and software that install into protected directories will no longer run, however JAMF binary is on the white list so will continue to work.

Rich Trouton, an Apple veteran with over 18 years of experience supporting Macs, provided an overview: “All malware tries to get root access,” Trouton mentioned as he explained why SIP became important for Apple to implement. SIP disables root access to certain system files and kernel extensions. “SIP is a big change, but still a work in progress. I expect Apple to update this in the future.”

He also warned against disabling SIP and suggested that If you are using software that requires SIP to be disabled, “demand more from those vendors or leave them.” You can check out his full presentation here.

A new CEO at JAMF Software

JNUC 2015 was also the first JNUC with Dean Hager as JAMF Software’s Chief Executive Officer. Hager has more than 20 years of experience in leadership positions at high-growth software and technology companies including Kroll Ontrack and Lawson Software.

On his appointment, he said: “Businesses and schools love Apple products, and are continuing to adopt Mac, iPad, and iPhone devices in droves. This creates an enormous opportunity for JAMF by providing an easy way to manage these devices, helping organisations both large and small succeed with Apple. I am thrilled to be a part of it and to be leading JAMF in its next stage of growth.”

The JNUC 5k

The event wasn’t all Apple IT admin (and posh dinners) though – there was also the small matter of a 5k run open to all delegates. One of our heroic Solutions Architects, Thomas Holbrook, took it upon himself to dash around Minneapolis in the October cold, so well done, Tom!

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Want to find out more about JAMF Software Casper Suite and our partnership with them? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email solutions@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Setting up your Mac as an OS X Server – File Sharing

Setting up your Mac as an OS X Server – File Sharing

Using your Mac (whether that be iMac, Mac mini, MacBook Pro or MacBook Air) as a server is just one of the many uses Mac has within your business. We’ve been looking at the basic setup of Mac to a Server, using the Profile Manager tool, File Sharing and the benefits this can bring to your employees.

While we were sad to see Mac mini with OS X Server be discontinued earlier this year, we’re glad that you can download the Server app from the App Store here for £13.99 and run it this way. The Server app is fully compatible with OS X Yosemite and is easy to install, set up and manage within your business.

After you install the OS X Server software, the Server app walks you through the configuration process, whether you’re setting up a small business network or connecting to your companies existing networks. The Server app lets you quickly manage users and groups on the Server and, if you haven’t done so, set up all your key services.

The latest update to OS X Server brings more power, control and collaboration to your organisation, so everyone on your team can work together more effectively. Use your Server for File Sharing, Profile Manager, Caching Server, Xcode Server, Time Machine, Wiki Server, Calendar, Contacts and Mail Servers and Xsan 4. Here’s File Sharing…

File Sharing with OS X Server and Mac

Use your Mac-powered Server for File Sharing within the business. With the File Sharing tool you can share folders, exchange files and access documents on your Mac, iPad or PC. Once your devices are set up to your Server, your employees can access and share files with each other. Whether your employees are working onsite or remotely, they can safely share files without jeopardising the confidentially of the information they share. SMB3 is the new, super-fast protocol for sharing files in OS X Server. It works to protect against tampering and eavesdropping by encrypting and signing data ‘in flight’. There’s also file-sharing connection monitoring, so you can see who’s accessing your server, who’s connected and for how long.

For those of you thinking about or already running a Server for File Sharing, it’s worth noting that we offer a solution that allows integration between Macs to Windows file servers if that’s your thing. Take a look at Acronis’ “ExtremeZ-IP File and Print Server here.

Want to know more about Mac? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email B2B@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Setting up your Mac as an OS X Server – Profile Manager

Setting up your Mac as an OS X Server – Profile Manager

Setting up your Mac (whether that be iMac, Mac mini, MacBook Pro or MacBook Air) as a server within your business makes it easier than ever for people in your organisation to collaborate, communicate and share information. Once your Mac is set up and running with the OS X Server app you can begin to use the Profile Manager tool for easy mobile management of you’re your employees’ devices.

The Profile Manager tool allows you to manage a whole host of mobile devices. From a business perspective, using your Mac as a server gives you control over what your devices have access to and what data your employees can share. Here’s a run down of what you can do in the Profile Manager tool:

Profile Manager simplifies deploying, configuring and managing your Mac computers and iOS devices in your business. It’s one place where you can control everything. In Profile Manager you can:

– Create profiles to set up user accounts for Mail, Calendar, Contacts and Messages.

– Configure system settings.

– Enforce restrictions.

– Set PIN and password policies.

– Simplify the distribution of apps and books purchased through the Volume Purchase Programme.

– Give users access to self-service web portals where they can download and install new configuration profiles.

– Clear passcodes and remotely lock or wipe Mac, iPhone or iPad if it’s been lost or stolen.

– Profile Manager also supports new Continuity features in Yosemite like Handoff.

Profile Manager can also be used in tandem with enterprise MDM solutions for better management of devices. We sell several solutions for this, including JAMF’s Casper Suite, which you can read about in more detail here.

Want to know more about Mac? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email B2B@Jigsaw24.com. To find out more about our managed solutions click here. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

OS X Yosemite: Compatibility roundup

OS X Yosemite: Compatibility roundup

With OS X Yosemite now available to download on your Mac, software manufacturers like Adobe and Quark are clamouring to let users know that their apps are compatible with Apple’s new OS. So we thought it was high time we rounded up all the announcements into one easy guide. 

We’ll be adding to the list as soon as we hear word from any other manufacturers regarding Yosemite support. Have we missed anything out? Let us know of any other updates in the comments below!

Adobe

“Adobe and Apple have worked closely together to test Adobe Creative Cloud applications for reliability, performance, and user experience when installed on Intel-based systems running Mac OS X Yosemite (version 10.10). The latest versions of all Adobe CC products are compatible. In addition to the current Photoshop CC release (2014.2), the Photoshop team has also tested Photoshop CC (14.2.1) and CS6 (13.0.6; 13.1.2) for compatibility.

“As with any new release of an operating system, there could be unexpected issues that arise that were not discovered during testing. If you encounter any issues, report them using the bug reporting form.” Check Adobe’s FAQs for more.

Avid

Avid have officially confirmed that Media Composer and Media Composer | Symphony Option will both work with OS X 10.10 Yosemite. However, users who are running “dual 6 core Mac Pro towers (Westmere) and the 2013 Mac Pro with a single 12 core CPU may experience performance issues with transcode, render, and playback. These degradations are typically seen with higher resolution material. The issue has been logged with Apple and [Avid] are awaiting an update.”

You’ll also need to make sure you’re running the latest builds of New Blue Titler Pro v1 and v2 in order to avoid installation errors.  These builds are available for download through Avid’s Application Manager, and details of how you’ll want things set up for a seamless installation can be found in the Media Composer | Software readme file.

You can find the readme and other key documentation over at the Avid Knowledge Base.

Enfocus

Enfocus PitStop 12 is also compatible with OS X Yosemite with the latest update (update 3). Users already on PitStop 12 can get the free update for PitStop Pro here, and for PitStop Server here.

Extensis

Suitcase Fusion 6 is compatible with Yosemite. Universal Type Server 5 and Universal Type Client 5 are compatible with Yosemite. Portfolio Web is compatible with Yosemite. Portfolio, Portfolio Express and Portfolio Netpublish are not currently supported on Yosemite. A future release is planned to add Yosemite support.” For more info, head to Extensis’s FAQs.

Quark

Quark have released a new update, QuarkXPress 10.5, which is a free update for QuarkXPress 10 that adds official support for OS X Yosemite. It’s available here. Note: “If you are on OS X Lion, please do not install this update. This update is not compatible with Quark Publishing Platform 10.2″. When QuarkXPress 2015 is released, that will also support OS X Yosemite.

Trim Enabler

Not strictly software, but if you’re using Trim Enabler to boost your SSD performance, it’s important to note this from Cindori:

“In OS X 10.10 (Yosemite), Apple has introduced a new security requirement called kext signing. (A kext is a kernel extension, or a driver, in Mac OS X). Kext signing basically works by checking if all the drivers in the system are unaltered by a third party, or approved by Apple. If they have been modified, Yosemite will no longer load the driver. This is a means of enforcing security, but also a way for Apple to control what hardware that third party developers can release OS X support for.

“Since Trim Enabler works by unlocking the Trim driver for third party SSDs, this security setting prevents Trim Enabler to enable Trim on Yosemite. To continue to use Trim Enabler and continue to get Trim for your third party SSD, you first need to disable the kext signing security setting. It is important to note that the kext-signing setting is global, if you disable it you should be careful to only install system drivers from sources that you trust.”

Wacom

Wacom have released new drivers for OS X Yosemite, and they’ve got a handy video and advice on installing them here.

  1. “Back up your preferences
  2. Uninstall the tablet driver, then restart your computer to empty out any residual processes
  3. Now you’re ready to install the latest tablet drivers
  4. Once the new driver is in place, click the backed up settings file to put your settings back to the way you like them
  5. Click this link for the latest Windows and OS X drivers: http://bit.ly/1tG3Cbu.”

Want to find out more? Give our team a call on 03332 400 888, email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook