What’s in store for the new Apple Mac Pro?

What’s in store for the new Apple Mac Pro?

It’s been nearly four years since Apple’s current Mac Pro was announced at WWDC in June 2013. To the delight of Mac geeks such as ourselves, Apple have announced a revamped Mac Pro is in the works, and pricing on existing high-end Mac Pros is set to come down.    

Rumours on what we can expect from Apple’s redesigned Mac Pro abound, but we may have to wait a while to see exactly what we’ll be getting our hands on come launch day.

When will it arrive?

Apple are keen to make this new model the best that it can be, and that’s going to take some time. The current timeframe suggests a 2018 launch, at the earliest.

“We have a team working hard on it right now,” says Phil Schiller, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing at Apple. “We want to architect it so that we can keep it fresh with regular improvements, and we’re committed to making it our highest-end, high-throughput desktop system, designed for our demanding pro customers.”

About the spec

Of course, we can’t say for certain, but the rumour mill has been churning out some pretty exciting stuff about what we can expect from the new Mac Pro. Rumours suggest that the new model will feature a modular design accommodating high-end CPUs and GPUs. We could be looking at a next-generation Intel Xeon E5 processor, and more RAM in the entry-level version if Apple follow what they’ve done with the MacBook Pro, which ships with 16GB as standard.

For a professional audience, it would be good to see a higher capacity of storage available than the 256GB PCIe-based flash storage found in current Mac Pro models. Looking at graphics cards, AMD revealed their new FirePro W-series in 2014, or there’s their Fury platform that could be a contender for the new machine.

In terms of ports, the current Mac Pro has six Thunderbolt 2 ports, four USB-3 ports, Dual Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI 1.4 UltraHD and a combined optical digital audio output/analogue line out mini-jack. The new model will probably include more Thunderbolt ports in the form of USB-3, and perhaps traditional Mac Pro users will get their wish of PCI slots to add faster SSDs and better video cards.

Current pricing on Mac Pro models

If you can’t wait until 2018 for a new model, Apple have announced that pricing on the higher-end Mac Pros will be coming down in the meantime. The entry-level 6-core Intel Xeon processor, dual AMD FirePro D500 GPUs and 16GB memory option is now available for £2999. The higher-end model now sits at £3899, with an 8-core processor and a dual D700 GPUs.

While we’re definitely excited for a long-awaited update on the Mac Pro, the existing model is still a powerful desktop option for creatives. With a potentially long wait ahead of us for the redesign, do you think it’s worth investing in the 2013 machine now prices have dropped? Let us know in the comments.

Want to find out more about Mac Pro options? Give us a call on 03332 400 888 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest technology news, reviews and articles, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘like’ us on Facebook.

 

Buyers’ guide: Apple desktops

Buyers’ guide: Apple desktops

While Mac has long been the go-to choice for creatives using resource-draining editing software or demanding design programs, Mac has also proven itself as a brilliant option for business and beyond. When it comes to Mac for desktop, there are three simple choices: the all-in-one iMac, the powerful, professional Mac Pro, and the compact and efficient Mac mini.

In the desktop arena, Mac faces fierce competition from a vast array of PCs all clamouring to sit atop your desk. And packing in a huge assortment of different processors, graphics cards and monitors, the desktop world can be a perplexing and intimidating place – particularly for first time buyers. With Apple’s Mac desktop range, you know what you’re getting – a familiar UI, trusty hardware and an assortment of essential creative software and applications at your fingertips.

Take a look at this essential buyers’ guide so you know exactly what you’re in for when you go with Apple and their Mac desktops.

iMac

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With its big, bright Retina display now available in 5K on the 27″ model and 4K on its 21.5″ sister, and powerful internals, the iMac really is the ultimate all-in-one desktop. It’s long been popular among image specialists and designers, and has caught the attention of videographers thanks to its built-in 4K editing capabilities. But outside of the creative world, it’s also found favour with business users, education institutions, and home users, thanks to its multi-purpose ethos.

The iMac is both sleek in design and space-efficient, with all the internals  built into its gorgeous, slim screen, meaning no cables and no mess. It even comes equipped with an Apple Magic Keyboard, Magic Mouse 2 or Magic Trackpad 2 to boot.

The specs:

21″ iMac

– 21″ widescreen display.

– Up to 2TB Fusion Drive.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Core i5 2.8GHz processor.

– Up to Intel Iris Pro Graphics 6200. 

From £869 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

21″ iMac with 4K Retina display 

– 21″ 4K Retina display.

– Up to 2TB Fusion Drive.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Core i7 3.3GHz processor.

– Up to Intel Iris Pro Graphics 6200. 

From £1199 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

27″ iMac with 5K Retina display

– 27″ 5K Retina display.

– Up to 3TB Fusion Drive.

– Up to 32GB (4x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Quad Core i7 4.0GHz processor.

– Up to AMD Radeon R9 M395X with 4GB of GDDR5 memory 

From £1449 ex VAT on Jigsaw24. 

Mac Pro

Mac Pro on Jigsaw24

The creative powerhouse and Apple’s workhorse, the Mac Pro is the only way to go if you’re looking for optimum performance, user-specific customisability and the ultimate editing hub. With the potential to house a colossal 64GB of RAM and up to 12 individual processors,  Mac Pro will deliver at every turn.

There’s a reason Mac Pro is considered the industry-standard – it’s fast and reliable, perfectly suited for editing audio and video in your favourite applications like Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro X and Da Vinci Resolve. The power of the Mac Pro is contained within its discreet yet stylish cylindrical casing and is only 25cm high and 5kg in weight – perfect for maintaining a clear, open workspace. Sporting all the ports you could ever need, Mac Pro allows you to connect all of your essential peripherals, right at home in a large creative suite complete with multiple monitors and lots of external storage. If you want to make use of Mac Pro’s customisability and design a desktop computer suited specifically to you, we recommend giving our Mac Pro Configurator a look.

The specs:

– Up to 2.7GHz 12-core processor.

– Up to 1TB PCIe-based flash storage.

– Up to 64GB (4x16GB) memory.

– Up to Dual AMD FirePro D700 with 6GB GDDR5 VRAM.

– Support for three 4K displays,

– Six Thunderbolt ports.

From £2485 ex VAT.

 

Mac mini

mac mini

The light and compact Mac mini offers an impressive amount of power for such a small computer. With 3GHz of muscle and up to 16GB of RAM, Mac mini coasts through those essential office tasks and performs well under processing pressure. While it may not match the sheer performance of the Mac Pro or iMac, it’s perfect for streaming your content around an office or in a meeting with AirPlay. For all of your admin, server, or streaming-based needs, look no further than the Mac mini.

The specs:

– Up to 1TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Dual Core i7 3GHz processor.

From £395 ex VAT.

Want to know more about MacBook, MacBook Air and MacBook Pro? Give us a call on 03332 409 306, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or just pop your details in the form below and we’ll be in touch. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

 

 

Buyers’ Guide: Mac for business

Buyers’ Guide: Mac for business

Looking to refresh your business’s computer deployment? These days, looking to Apple is probably your best option. As well as their power, flexibility and ease of use, they’re also incredibly durable and reliable, so you can count on a better TCO and ROI than with PC counterparts.

Your options are much simpler too – you have a choice of MacBook Air, MacBook Pro (with or without Touch Bar) and the 12″ MacBook, as well as desktop computers in the form of Mac Pro, iMac and Mac mini, which can come with differing internal features depending on your needs. When shopping for PC ‘ultrabooks’ and desktops, on the other hand, there simply isn’t one single contender to match Mac, but a whole universe of laptops and desktops sporting differing processors and screen sizes (not to mention vastly varying build quality), which can get rather confusing.

To make things even easier, we’ve broken down the range below, giving recommendations based on the team’s actual experience using Mac within the business, as well as links to buy. If you are wanting to deploy a raft of new notebooks and desktops, you’ll probably want to talk to us first, as experts in all things Apple, including integration, rollout, management and post-sales support. But let’s take a look at the actual products available first…

MacBook Air

Ideal for: Mobile workers who need long battery life

MacBook Air on Jigsaw24

MacBook Air has been around since 2008, and in that time, Apple have really worked on making its internals match its external form factor. One of the thinnest (just 1.7cm at its thickest point) and lightest (as little as 1.08kg) notebooks around, it is undoubtably good looking, but that stunning design also means it’s incredibly portable. That makes it a great choice for anyone who needs to run applications on the move when a tablet just won’t cut it – so salespeople, client-facing consultants and other staff in the field, for example.

Equally, if we are called in to a meeting, we can just pick up our MacBook Air and head down, hooking up to the room’s display (either wirelessly over AirPlay and Apple TV, or through a wired Mini DisplayPort connection) to share with the group. The 11″ model in particular, can easily be stowed away in your bag and carried around all day without putting your shoulder out.

Another feature that’s bound to be a boon for business is the battery life. Apple say the 11″ model will go nine hours without a recharge, while the 13″ model, which includes larger batteries, tops out at 12 hours. Of course, your mileage may vary depending on what apps you’re running, display settings and other factors, but that’s more than enough to get you through a full business day before you have to plug in again. The fact that they rely solely on solid state flash storage also means MacBook Air is speedy too – 17x faster than a traditional 5400-rpm notebook hard drive, in fact.

The latest versions feature:

11″ MacBook Air

– 11.6″ high-res glossy display.

– Up to 512GB flash storage.

– Up to 8GB RAM.

– Fifth-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors.

– Intel HD Graphics 6000 processor.

– From £549 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

13″ MacBook Air

– 13.3″ high-res glossy display.

– Up to 512GB flash storage.

– Up to 8GB RAM.

– Fifth-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors.

– Intel HD Graphics 6000 processor.

– From £702 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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MacBook Pro

Ideal for: Those needing more power from a portable computer

MacBook Pro on Jigsaw24

MacBook Pro is Apple’s powerhouse portable (our designers use it on shoots, and it happily handles rendering and exporting compositions in processor-intensive apps like Adobe Creative Cloud’s Photoshop and InDesign, while they get on with the rest of their workload).

The latest generation of MacBook Pro comes in three flavours: MacBook Pro 13″, MacBook Pro 13″ with Touch Bar and Touch ID, and MacBook Pro 15″ with Touch Bar and Touch ID.

The no-frills 13″ model was described by Apple CEO Tim Cook as “a MacBook Pro for MacBook Air users” and is the lightest and slimmest of the bunch. It’s 12% thinner than the current MacBook Air (at the wide end of the taper, admittedly, but still), and is 13% smaller by volume. Despite this highly portable form factor, the MacBook Pro 13″ still boasts a Retina Display, a 2.4GHz dual core Intel Core i7 processor, 512GB of flash storage and 16GB RAM, to make it the clear winner if you need a combination of power and portability.

The other two MacBook Pro models features Apple’s Touch ID biometric sensor, allowing users to log in, switch accounts and even make purchases simply by scanning a fingerprint. It also means that these models will support biometric security measures and two-factor authentication, so if security is your top priority, these are the laptops for you.

These models are the first to feature Apple’s unique Touch Bar, a Retina-quality display that sits where the function keys used to and offers context-aware shortcuts to common tasks. For example, in Mail, you’ll see keys for sending and replying to mail, while in a video editing app you’ll see your timeline in miniature – great for helping your creatives work more quickly and intuitively.

All three models use the latest USB-C standard which, depending on which adaptor you’re using, can act as a power cable, DisplayPort connection, Thunderbolt 3 port, HDMI port or VGA port, meaning you can use the MacBook Pro as the basis of a much larger workstation with desktop storage and multiple monitors.

13″ MacBook Pro

– 13.3″ widescreen Retina display.

– Up to 512GB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB RAM.

– Dual-core Intel Core i7 processors.

– Intel Iris 540 graphics.

– From £1347 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

13″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar and Touch ID

– 13.3″ ultra-thin Retina display.

– Up to 1TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB RAM.

– Dual core Intel Core i7 processors.

– Intel Iris 550 graphics.

– From £1449 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

15″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar and Touch ID

– 15.4″ ultra-thin Retina display.

– Up to 2TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB RAM.

– Quad-core Intel Core i7 processors.

– AMD Radeon Pro 460 graphics processor.

– From £1947 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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MacBook

Ideal for: Mobile workers who need maximum energy efficiency

MacBook on Jigsaw24

The 12″ MacBook joined the Mac notebook lineup in 2015. It was the first non-pro Mac notebook to feature a Retina display and also the first to come in a range of colours. While it’s not as powerful as the MacBook Pro and Air, it’s still speedy, complete with the new Intel Core M processor, up to 8GB of RAM and up to 512GB of flash storage.

Apple say it’s also their most energy efficient computer, using just five watts of power, and doing away with the fan for silent running. Like the MacBook Pro range, it takes advantage of the USB-C standard to combine power, video and ultrafast data transfer into a single cable, so you will want to invest in USB-C adaptors if your staff opt for this model.

12″ MacBook

– 12″ Retina display.

– Up to 512GB flash storage.

– 8GB RAM.

– Core m processor.

– Intel HD Graphics 5300.

– Gold, silver or space grey colour schemes.

– From £1035 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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Mac Pro

Ideal for: Video and heavy creative work

Mac Pro on Jigsaw24

Moving on to desktop workstations, we have the Mac Pro – Apple’s workhorse. While you may not need 64GB RAM or 12 cores of processing power for everyday business tasks and systems, if you have an in-house creative team, they’ll thank you for investing in Mac Pro, the industry standard for design work, and video and audio editing.

This latest generation of Mac Pro, released in 2013, introduced a radical new design. Ditching the classic tower form factor in favour of a sleek cylindrical casing, Mac Pro manages to pack all its internals into a 25cm high, 5kg casing that will happily sit on a desk, and it comes with enough ports that you’re able to connect all the displays, storage and peripherals you require. And, if there’s a specific configuration you need, you can add your own RAM, processors and storage with our online Mac Pro Configurator.

Mac Pro

– Up to 2.7GHz 12-core processor.

– Up to 1TB PCIe-based flash storage.

– Up to 64GB (4x16GB) memory.

– Up to Dual AMD FirePro D700 with 6GB GDDR5 VRAM.

– Support for three 4K displays,

– Six Thunderbolt ports.

– From £1799 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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iMac

Ideal for: Creative teams or those needing an all-in-one workstation

iMac on Jigsaw24

iMac has long been the choice of graphic designers and imaging specialists for its power and large display, but it’s perfect for the office too. An all-in-one workstation, all the internals and connectivity are neatly contained within its incredibly slim form factor, so there’s no desk clutter, and it comes with an Apple keyboard and Magic Mouse or Magic Trackpad too. In 2014, Apple also launched a 27″ iMac with Retina 5K display, which is great for seeing content with an increased level of colour and detail, as well as being ideal if you want more screen real estate so you have a larger workspace to fit your toolbars, and work on the content itself.

21″ iMac

– 21″ widescreen display.

– Up to 1TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Core i7 3.1GHz processor.

– From £869 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

21.5″ iMac with 4K Retina display

– 21.5″ widescreen display.

– Up to 2TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Core i7 3.3GHz processor.

– From £1199 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

27″ 5K iMac with Retina display

– 27″ 5K Retina display.

– Up to 3TB Fusion storage.

– Up to 8GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Quad Core i7 4.0GHz processor.

– From £1449 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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Mac mini

Ideal for: General office work

Mac mini on Jigsaw24

The smallest of Apple’s desktop options, Mac mini is ideal for the desk, but that doesn’t mean it’s lightweight. With up to 16GB RAM and 3GHz processing power, it’ll breeze through spreadsheets, as well as more processor-intesive tasks, while using up a tiny amount of power. All you need is to hook it up to a display, and add a keyboard and mouse.

Mac mini

– Up to 2TB flash storage.

– Up to 16GB (2x8GB) RAM.

– Up to Dual Core i7 3GHz processor.

– From £395 ex VAT on Jigsaw24.

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Want to know more about MacBook, MacBook Air and MacBook Pro? Give us a call on 03332 409 306, email sales@Jigsaw24.com or just pop your details in the form below and we’ll be in touch. For all the latest news and tips, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

Or fill in the form below to find out about our b7 proof of concept trial for executives that lets you see the benefits of Mac – such as improved productivity and lower total cost of ownership – before you invest.

Interview: Apple Mac Pro one year on, with Sanjiv Sathiah

Interview: Apple Mac Pro one year on, with Sanjiv Sathiah

It’s hard to believe Apple’s Mac Pro is now a year old, having been first unveiled at last year’s WWDC. With the new Mac Pro now working its way onto desktops across the creative industries, we caught up with Sanjiv Sathiah, news editor at MacNN.com and Electronista (and devoted Apple fan!) to find out his thoughts on the mighty Mac Pro a year down the line, and why it still reminds him of a Sith Lord…

It’s been a while now since you originally reviewed the Mac Pro for Electronista/MacNN. Have your opinions changed at all?

“Like all Apple enthusiasts who first saw the new Mac Pro teased at last year’s WWDC, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on one. It radically reimagines workstation computing in a way that no one else but Apple could have delivered. I’m just as excited about it today as I was the day I saw it; it really is an amazing piece of technology.

“For me, it is an embodiment of the Apple design and engineering philosophy. If you look at previous Mac Pros, it’s like Apple just instantly jumped ahead a decade in terms of workstation design. It is the ultimate in refinement, stripping away everything that could be considered non-essential, leaving behind only exactly what is needed to power professional workflows right now.

“The new Mac Pro is a stripped down and lean machine, designed for both speed and heavy lifting. There is not a single component that could be considered a bottleneck, with optimal bandwidth a key consideration right throughout its system architecture. It really is a joy to use, and of course, it looks simply stunning.”

What’s the general reception been like with staff at Electronista/MacNN?

“Like me, I think everyone in the team loves what it has to offer the Apple power user. It is the most expandable Mac Pro yet, but at the same time it is just 1/8 the size of the previous generation and also manages to be substantially more powerful across the board. Some of the team miss the chassis space of the older model, but this was not always fully utilised by Mac Pro owners in the past.”

Has uptake among professionals and consumers matched your initial thoughts?

“I haven’t seen any official sales figures that break out Mac Pro sales on their own. However, Apple’s Mac revenue was up in the last quarter year-on-year by 5%, and it seems likely that the new Mac Pro played some role in that.

“The fact that it took Apple over six months for supply to catch up with demand shows that it has been hugely successful. Some of that was due to pent-up demand, no doubt, as a new model was overdue. But, it would seem that the wait was well and truly worth it.”

Are there any specific tasks that you think have seen the best performance uplifts since the upgrade?

“The new Mac Pro has incredible CPU, RAM, GPU, storage and connectivity bandwidth. Even the entry-level model fitted with quad-core Intel Xeon E5 CPU and dual-AMD FirePro D300 GPUs offers serious computing power.

“You have to remember that the new Mac Pro is optimised to utilise both the CPU in combination with the GPUs for computational processes in a number of OpenCL-compatible professional applications like Final Cut Pro among many others. The GPUs alone provide between 4-7 teraflops of processing power, depending on model configuration.

“Mac OS X’s support for OpenCL benefits users in all types of pro applications, including those using 3D intensive modelling CAD applications, through to realtime 4K movie editing, photo editing and music making. Scientific applications also benefit tremendously from the new Mac Pros. I use Logic Pro a lot and have enjoyed nothing but smooth sailing since upgrading to the Mac Pro myself.”

And have you seen any particularly clever Mac Pro setups or uses?

“I have seen one hooked up to six Thunderbolt displays, which was cool. The potential is definitely there for some incredible setups thanks to the six Thunderbolt 2 ports that Apple has built into the device. With the daisy-chaining capability of Thunderbolt, you could actually hook in another 30 Thunderbolt utilities in addition to the six Thunderbolt displays, which is pretty wild.”

What about that design? Still love it?

“Oh yeah; it is the coolest-looking computer I’ve seen in a long time. It reminds me of Darth Vader in the way that its case lifts away to reveal its inner workings. Very Sith indeed. I’m looking forward to seeing the same polished anodised Space Grey finish applied to some other products from Apple – perhaps it might appear on the rumoured MacBook Air redesign…?”

Are there any accessories you definitely recommend?

“Yes actually. While I can’t wait for Apple to release its own Thunderbolt 2 displays, LG has made an outstanding Thunderbolt 2-equipped QHD IPS UltraWide monitor. The 34UM95 is 34-inches on the diagonal and is packed with 3440×1440 pixels for a total of nearly 5 million pixels. It’s impressive and makes for a nice companion to the Mac Pro.”

What improvements, if any, could you see Apple still make to the Mac Pro?

“My list of grievances with the Mac Pro is very short. I simply wish that for all its incredible connectivity, Apple had included an SD card slot in the machine, even if people can still connect a camera to it over USB. Some users might have preferred six USB 3.0 slots and just four Thunderbolt 2 ports. Other than that, for me, it is absolutely perfect.

“I think Apple has ticked all the right boxes with the new Mac Pro. It is a bandwidth beast. If you need a machine that will crunch through processor intensive tasks, the Mac Pro exists for that very purpose. It’s perfect for prosumers too, who might do quite a bit of general computing as well. And although the AMD GPUs are optimised for parallel processing tasks, they still perform really well for a bit of Mac gaming in your downtime – each of the GPUs in even the entry-level model has more grunt than the latest Xbox One or PS4.”

So can you see Mac Pro on many Christmas lists this year?

“Absolutely. And the Jigsaw24 Mac Pro configurator is a great place to start when looking to build your dream machine!”

– You can read Sanjiv’s full review of the Mac Pro for Electronista/MacNN here.

Jigsaw24 Mac Pro configurator

Want to know more about Apple’s Mac Pro? Email sales@Jigsaw24.com or call 03332 409 306. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.
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NAB 2014: Sonnet to show Mac Pro rackmount enclosure with Thunderbolt 2-to-PCIe expansion system

NAB 2014: Sonnet to show Mac Pro rackmount enclosure with Thunderbolt 2-to-PCIe expansion system

As the broadcast world ramps up for NAB 2014, the pre-show announcements are getting more and more exciting. Today, Sonnet have announced an xMac Pro Server that will securely house the new, cylindrical Mac Pro and allow you to connect three PCIe expansion cards via Thunderbolt 2. It provides 5.25″ mobile rack expansion — all in a 4U enclosure.


IRVINE, CA — 26th March, 2014. At the 2014 NAB show in booth SL10824, Sonnet Technologies will unveil the xMac Pro Server Thunderbolt 2-to-PCI Express (PCIe) expansion system and 4U rackmount enclosure for new Mac Pro computers. Similar in concept to Sonnet’s award-winning xMac mini Server for Mac mini computers, the xMac Pro Server securely mounts the Mac Pro horizontally inside a specially designed modular enclosure that connects three PCIe 2.0 slots to the computer via Thunderbolt 2 technology, and provides space to install additional equipment in two 5.25″ mobile rack bays.

By supporting every Thunderbolt-compatible PCIe card available, the xMac Pro Server enables audio-video professionals to use the high-performance PCIe cards they need with the latest Mac Pro, which on its own lacks PCIe expansion slots. Supported cards include pro audio, Ethernet, and Fibre Channel, as well as SAS/SATA RAID controllers, and video capture and editing cards.

“With the success of our rackmountable xMac mini Server and Echo Express III-R Thunderbolt 2-to-PCIe expansion products, it was natural for us to properly address the need to efficiently rackmount the new Mac Pro and provide much-needed expansion capabilities,” said Robert Farnsworth, CEO of Sonnet Technologies. “Ever since the new Mac Pro was announced, our customers have been asking us for this product, and we believe they will be pleased with our solution.”

The xMac Pro Server’s heavy-duty steel outer enclosure provides secure mounting and protection for the Mac Pro, PCIe cards, and mobile rack devices installed inside. Occupying a 4U rack space (7″) and just 16″ deep, this system is perfect for use in a wide range of popular mobile racks, carts, and rack cases, as well as in a server room. The computer, PCIe card expansion system, and mobile rack devices reside in separate modules to simplify setup and maintenance. To make the Mac Pro fully rack- and road-ready, Sonnet constructed a protective cocoon for the computer out of formed steel and lined it with soft-touch padding to hold the computer firmly in place while safeguarding its lustrous finish.

The xMac Pro Server’s PCIe card expansion system incorporates ultrafast 20Gbps Thunderbolt 2 technology, providing sufficient throughput to support many of the highest-performing PCIe cards. The expansion system supports up to three full-length PCIe cards with one x16 and two x8 PCIe slots. Along with an integrated 300-watt power supply, the system includes a 75-watt PCIe power connector for cards that require supplementary power such as the Avid Pro Tools HDX or the RED ROCKET-X cards.

Mounted on its side inside the xMac Pro Server, the Mac Pro is kept cool by a quiet and efficient cooling system with an airflow path that remains unchanged and unobstructed according to Apple’s specifications. The PCIe card expansion system’s two remarkably quiet, temperature-controlled, variable-speed fans manage airflow to ensure cool, reliable operation in noise-sensitive environments.

The xMac Pro Server extends the Mac Pro’s Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0, and HDMI interfaces to panel-mounted connectors on the back of the unit for easy external cable connection, while a USB 3.0 interface and power switch are mounted on the front to enable the user to conveniently connect a USB peripheral and activate the computer’s power switch. The included Thunderbolt cable connects the Mac Pro to one of the xMac Pro Server’s two Thunderbolt 2 ports, and an included lock secures the Thunderbolt cables in place when connected to the expansion system. These features make the xMac Pro Server ideal for use in both fixed and mobile applications.

With the optional Mobile Rack Device Mounting Kit, the xMac Pro Server provides space for additional expansion equipment. Users can install two 5.25″ mobile rack devices in the outer enclosure and connect them easily to cards installed in the PCIe slots. Without taking up additional rack space, the kit supports a wide array of devices such as an internal LTO tape drive, four or eight swappable 2.5″ SSDs, a Blu-ray burner, a Sonnet Qio MR pro universal media reader, or three swappable 3.5″ hard disk drives. The kit easily installs into the xMac Pro Server’s enclosure, and an integrated 100-watt power supply inside the kit powers the installed devices while its internal fan works to keep the devices cool. Sonnet will also offer preconfigured kits that include the mobile rack devices, PCIe card, and necessary cables.

Along with the new xMac Pro Server, Sonnet expects to display the RackMac Pro, its upcoming rackmount enclosure for two Mac Pro computers. Similar to the xMac Pro Server in many ways, the RackMac Pro offers users a simpler way to rack one or two Mac Pro computers in a 4U rack space. Pricing and availability will be announced at a future date.

The xMac Pro Server (part number XMAC-PS) has a suggested retail price of $1,499 and is expected to be available from 2nd June. The basic-edition Mobile Rack Device Mounting Kit, formerly named Echo Express III-R Mobile Rack Kit (part number EXP3FR-MRM), has a suggested retail price of $199 and is available now. An extensive list of PCIe cards compatible with the xMac Pro Server is available on Sonnet’s website, with the list continually expanding as more cards are tested and certified. Like Sonnet’s Echo Express family of Thunderbolt 2-to-PCIe expansion systems, the xMac Pro Server was designed, engineered, and built by Sonnet in California.

Want to know more about the latest from Sonnet? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us Facebook

Jigsaw24’s top tech bloggers

Jigsaw24’s top tech bloggers

We love a good blog as much as the next person, and are constantly on the lookout for the latest Apple news, Mac Pro reviews and other creative bits and bobs. So we thought it’d be a good idea to round up all our top tech bloggers into one place, and for each of the chosen bloggers, we designed a custom Jigsaw24 badge to show our gratitude (there was a bit of a fight over who got the rabbit).

These guys are all well worth a look into if you’re interested in anything technology-related. You can see their bios and Twitter profiles below.

 

@BrianatPC
Brian Westover – PCMag.com

Bio: “Brian Westover is an Analyst for the Hardware Team, reviewing laptops, desktops, and storage devices. Brian has been writing professionally since 2007, and his work has appeared in business newsletters, websites, textbooks, and magazines.” Twitter: @BrianatPC

@DaveNeal33
Dave Neal – The Inquirer

Bio: “Thyroid Cancer Enduring Technology Journalist & Geek. Of Mice, Memory and Chemotherapy.” Twitter: @DaveNeal33

 

@NeilBennett
Neil Bennett – Digital Arts

Bio: “Editor of Digital Arts. Man about town. Music snob. Father. You know the rest.” Twitter: @NeilBennett

 

@PierceDavid
David Pierce – The Verge

Bio: “Senior Reviews Editor at The Verge. Formerly an analyst at PCMag. Written for Wired, The Washington Post, PC World, and others. Zog Sports soccer champion. I live in Brooklyn, studied politics at the University of Virginia (properly known as Mr. Jefferson’s University), and have been known to eat Ramen from time to time.” Twitter: @PierceDavid

@gethill
Matt Hill – T3.com

Bio: “Tech! Games! Films! Magazines! Tablets! Spurs! Monsters! Own views! Live! Editor, T3 Magazine & Digital Editions.” Twitter: @gethill

 

@gak_pdx
Greg Koenig – Atomic Delights

Bio: “I’m a product designer living in Portland, Oregon. Eventually I’ll tell you more, but the only germane thing to know is that I love making things and appreciating how others make things.” Twitter: @gak_pdx

@sathinator
Sanjiv Sathiah – Electronista.com/MacNN.com

Bio: “News Editor at Electronista.com/MacNN.com, Transport for NSW, muso, music lover, movie lover.” Twitter: @sathinator

 

@TechPunk316
Khidr Suleman – ITPro

Bio: “Khidr Suleman is the Technical Editor at IT Pro, a role he has fulfilled since March 2012. He is responsible for the reviews section on the site  – so get in touch if you have a product you think might be of interest to the business world. He also covers the hardware and operating systems beats.” Twitter: @TechPunk316

 

@geegeemidnight
Gerald Lynch – Tech Digest

Bio: “News Editor @ Gizmodo UK . Successful tech blogger, failed guitar hero. WL2M Iggy Pop, Reeves and Mortimer. Keep the Faith.” Twitter: @geegeemidnight

 

Hunter and Tom at Digital Spy Tech
Hunter Skipworth and Tom Mansell – Digital Spy Tech

Hunter: “Technology Editor for Digital Spy. Not related to Hunter from Gladiators. Views my own. I like tech, turtles and cars … sorry.” Tom: “Video Producer for @digitalspy All views expressed here are my own. More moderate in real life.” Twitter: @HunterSkipworth/@Mansellto

@jonnyevans_cw
Jonny Evans – Computerworld

Bio: “Word-miner, watching iChange since ’99. Watching Apple since ’99.” Twitter: @jonnyevans_cw

 

@matthewbbolton
Matthew Bolton – MacFormat/TechRadar

Bio: “Deputy Editor of MacFormat and Future’s Apple Specials (and tech journalist). Opinions expressed are entirely my own folly.” Blog: MacFormat Twitter: @matthewbbolton

 

@ISO50
Scott Hansen – ISO50/Tycho

Bio: “I am a San Francisco, California based musician (Tycho) and artist (ISO50). I created the ISO50 site originally to house my design work in a portfolioformat but over the years it has grown to encompass a shop, clothing line, and blog.” Twitter: @ISO50

 

@LarryJordanFCP
Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.biz

Bio: “Meet Larry Jordan, an internationally-renowned consultant and Apple-Certified trainer with over 35 years experience as a television producer, director and editor with national broadcast and corporate credits.” Twitter: @LarryJordanFCP

 

@markprigg
Mark Prigg – MailOnline/StuffTV

Bio: “US Science and Technology Editor @MailOnline, Welsh, Cardiff City fan, primate enthusiast.” Twitter: @markprigg

@ijosborne
Ian Osborne – MacFormat/TechRadar

Bio: “I’m the reviews editor for MacFormat. This is my personal Twitter account, so all opinions expressed here are my own and not those of my employer.” Twitter: @ijosborne

@TheRegister
Stephen Dean – The Register

Bio: Tech writer and reviewer at The Register, specialising in Apple Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, iPad and iPhone news and review. Twitter: @TheRegister

 

@drizzled
Darrell Etherington – TechCrunch

Bio: “A writer focused on covering early-stage startups, especially those with a technology focus.” Twitter: @drizzled

 

@videomaker
Jackson Wong – Videomaker

Bio: “I keep Star Wars stuff on my desk and love video production. I also appreciate foley and sports broadcast. And I usually know how to write longer sentences…” Blog: Twitter: @Videomaker

@flargh
Peter Cohen – iMore

Bio: “Managing editor, iMore.com. Freelance tech journo. Husband to @fletchen, dad to three kids.” Twitter: @flargh

 

@danawollman
Dana Wollman – Engadget

Bio: “Engadget managing editor (still overseeing reviews), native Brooklynite, marathoner, lover of puns. No Twitter pitches, please.” Twitter: @DanaWollman

 

Want more of the latest news on Apple, Mac and iPad and the hottest new creative technology? Get in touch with the team on 03332 409 306 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest festive news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Lucas Gilman talks Thunderbolt storage, Mac Pro and the G-Technology ev

Lucas Gilman talks Thunderbolt storage, Mac Pro and the G-Technology ev

Photographer and videographer Lucas Gilman has built a reputation on getting fantastic action shots in some of the most trying conditions imaginable, so he’s perfect if you’re looking for someone to stress test your latest kit. Recently, he’s been putting both G-Technology’s Evolution Series and Apple’s new Mac Pro through its paces, so we caught up with him to find out how they fared…

We hear you’ve been taking the new G-Technology ev series out on shoots recently. How does it fit into your workflow?

I shoot a lot of stuff on location around the world, and originally I was using the G-Technology G-RAID minis in the field. However, with the advent of the ev series, it’s made things a lot smoother in terms of going out and capturing both stills and motion. A lot of organisation needs to be done in the field to jump-start the editing process when I’m back in the studio.

I primarily capture in the field, so the first order of business after a day of shooting is to download everything to a backup drive instantaneously. I use a G-DOCK ev with Thunderbolt via a 15” MacBook Pro with Retina display. So I’m harnessing the speed of Thunderbolt, and I’m able to duplicate that data using Shotput Pro for the video things or Photo Mechanic on stills.

That means that right away I’ve got two backup copies. With video, we go to four drafts simultaneously using two G-DOCKs with two G-DRIVE evs in each. On top of that, I’ve got my master copy, which is on the CF or SD card. Those are then geographically separated, and it’s not until then that I’ll begin to go through and start organising data.

The great thing is that once I get back to the studio office, or the mothership, I can plug these G-DRIVE evs right into the G-DOCK that I’ve got on my desk and start ingesting all of that data.

Is that the storage you’d work off for the rest of the project?

Basically, G-SPEEDs are my backup drives, and then for any video work I’m typically using G-RAIDs. Any live work is going on G-RAIDs for video, live work and / or archive is going onto G-SPEEDs.

Basically every day of a shoot I have a set of G-DRIVE ev’s for that given day. So if it’s a ten-day shoot, that means I have twenty G-DRIVE ev’s. If I’m shooting video, I’d have forty G-DRIVE ev’s. And when we get back, all those drives get plugged into G-DOCKs next to my Mac Pro, and all that data starts getting downloaded into the various G-SPEEDs or G-RAIDs. For instance, my photo workflow for my live work, the images that I’m actually working on, and my archive, I use

G-SPEED Q USB 3.0 drives, because that’s totally sufficient for my photo needs. The backup and archive of all the video projects is done via a Thunderbolt RAID Expansion adapter with two G-SPEED eS PROs, which are really fast, and for the daily work I’m using the G-RAIDs. They’re tough, they’re fast, they’re Thunderbolt, they’re all that great stuff.

Why did you gravitate to that particular setup?

It’s easier to be doing all this data backup in the field with the G-DOCK because now I don’t have to manually do it drive-to-drive, or have a bunch of drives plugged in, which is near impossible when you’re on location. I can use G-DRIVEs and the G-DOCK in a JBOD [‘just a bunch of disks’, ie non-RAID] configuration so that they all just show up as independent drives [and only have to do the transfer once]. It makes it so there’s no human error. Because there’s only one copy. It’s easy to stay organised because there’s less to track.

And how are the drives holding up so far?

As far as the speed goes, the G-DRIVE ev’s are definitely sufficient to get the workflow done. I know that there will be speed improvements in the pipeline, because with G-Technology, everything gets faster and bigger every year, so I’m definitely looking forward to that as well as some incorporation of SSD in there at some point.

How important is storage to your workflow?

For me personally, a lot of the things I shoot will never happen again. For instance, I shoot a lot of big water drops and big wave surfing – things that you can’t recreate. So if you screw up and lose a card from that day’s shoot or it falls out of your pocket or whatever, it’s gone forever. So it’s really important for me to have a backup strategy.

Why should people be investing in the best storage they can?

I basically use and trust G-Technology because in my opinion they make the most well built and – consistently – the fastest drives that cater to creative professionals. On top of that, they’re using enterprise class drives in a lot of their products.  For me it all comes down to trust, reliability and speed. Think about it – if I go to Iceland for Land Rover, that’s thousands of dollars we’re spending onsite, the campaign took years to come together, so I spend a little extra on hard drives that I can trust with my creative vision.”

I’ve seen some shots you took of people surfing in pretty glacial waters. I imagine it’s hard to find tech that’ll keep working consistently in arctic conditions.

Exactly. The reason I gravitated to the G-Technology products was that they were built to a higher standard. And that allows me, as a creative professional; to focus on the task at hand and not be worrying about if a drive’s ready to go. That’s just wasted time and energy, when I could be focusing on the project and producing good, relevant content for my clients.

How does this generation of models compare to the ones you were using previously?

As far as the speed, they’re obviously faster, but the form factor is the beauty of it. The fact that I can plug a G-DRIVE ev into my Mac via USB 3 if I want, independently, or I can use them in the G-DOCK and leverage its Thunderbolt speed. In the field I use them via USB, then plug them right into the G-DOCK once I get home. The nice thing is that I don’t have to have a bunch of cords hanging off my desk and a bunch of drives – I don’t have to worry and think ‘oh, did I do that drive yet or not?’ It’s really simple and makes everything really fluid.

Is desktop storage key to your workflow, or do you find yourself working with SAN/nearline/archive setups too? If so, how does your G-Technology storage integrate with that?

I look at the G-DOCK as an ingest mechanism. So you’ve got the data already organised on these cartridges (G-DRIVE evs), and then just ingesting it into your nearline system, like G-RAID or my SAN’s G-SPEED eS PROs, it’s really very simple – basically plug and play. It’s just another method of getting the data from point A to point B, and it’s really fast.

And how have you found using it with Mac Pro?

The benefit of integrating the Mac Pro and the G-Technology system is that the Mac Pro, having six Thunderbolt 2 ports, allows me to attach a lot of peripherals and gives me a lot of flexibility.

But I think the benefit of the Mac Pro is that it is pretty much the fastest computer on the planet. It’s super reliable. It’s very expandable from a peripheral standpoint, and that’s great because G-Technology have made a very concerted effort to move forward with Thunderbolt.

Having that really fast Mac Pro, having Thunderbolt-ready drives, or being able to use Thunderbolt devices such as an ATTO Thunderstream so that I can run SANs, really allows me to configure the system how I want.

I think that’s going to be the big key point for creative professionals, especially in the motion and video market. They’re not pigeonholed into a particular workflow. If they want to run SANs, they can. If they want to run eSATA they can. If you want to use third party cards that will attach via Thunderbolt, you can do that too.  You’re really able to keep that system growing and future-proof it, in a sense.

How have you found working on Mac Pro? Does it live up to the hype?

For me it’s the fastest computer I’ve ever used. Previously, because I do like Thunderbolt, I was using the fastest possible iMac – everything was completely maxed out – and the Mac Pro is way, way faster than that. It allows me to render a lot of data very quickly, and seamlessly scrub through a lot of HD footage. I’m doing my edits a lot quicker. And the fact that I’ve got dual 6GB graphics cards as well as eight core processors – it’s kind of amazing.

Is this going to let you tackle bigger and better projects?

Totally. As of recently, I’ve been shooting pretty much 1080p, but I would definitely think about shooting 4K now, because I could actually do something with it as opposed to it just being a massive chore. That’ll really allow me a lot more flexibility in post whether I’m cropping or moving within the frames or even just shooting super-slow motion stuff. Being able to crunch through all that data now will open up the opportunities for me to be more creative.

What applications have you been using on the new Mac Pro?

I like FCP X. Aperture is my main photo editing app with a little Photoshop thrown in – a sprinkling of Photoshop, I guess you’d say. Typically I feel like the Apple applications are really optimised for this machine, so it’s able to give a much higher level of performance than anybody else can offer.

What performance gains have you seen on the new Mac Pro vs the previous generation?

I had an older generation Mac Pro and then I upgraded everything to iMac because I wanted Thunderbolt. So I had the most current iMac with the fastest processors, maxed out with RAM as well as dual graphics cards and an internal SSD, so it was the fastest you could purchase. I’d say this is eight to ten times faster than my iMac was. Graphics-intensive things like rendering video and such, you just don’t register those things having to render anymore.

What kind of transfer speeds have you seen through Thunderbolt 2?

I have not clocked anything recently. I’m not a speeds and feeds guy. I don’t get too deeply into the tech. But what I do notice is when I’m on a job and I’m not waiting for anything to happen, whether it’s transferring data or rendering – when I’m able to do that really quickly and it feels like wow, that took no time. I don’t even notice it happening because there’s no slowdown, that’s what makes or breaks it for me.

We hear you’ve also been using a Sharp 4K display – can you tell us a little about how you’ve found that?

It’s been great. The only issue I had was that I had to reconfigure all my mouse settings because there’s so much real estate. You literally move your mouse across your desk and it would move a quarter each on my screen. I thought, ‘what is this? Is this a glitch? Oh no, there are a lot more pixels here, and there’s a lot more real estate!’

It’s really taking photo editing to the next level because you just notice more things, it’s just that much more apparent. As far as the video editing goes, having that amount of real estate is great, but it’s also really being able to dig into that footage and notice the nuances and being able to colour grade things on a much higher level really makes things a lot more pleasant. The Sharp display is absolutely amazing.

Want to know more about G-Technology’s latest and the new Mac Pro? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email MacPro@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

Thunderbolt vs Thunderbolt 2: ATTO’s comparison guide

Thunderbolt vs Thunderbolt 2: ATTO’s comparison guide

With Mac Pro finally upon us, you might be wondering just how the new Thunderbolt 2 connection stacks up against regular old Thunderbolt. Luckily, ATTO have been experimenting with Thunderbolt 2 and released their findings in a handy document for you.

The first thing to remember, ATTO say in their comparison guide, is that Thunderbolt 2 doesn’t mean 2x the bandwidth of Thunderbolt. Thunderbolt 2 enables two 20Gbps bi‐direction channels instead of four 10Gbps channels, and performance is limited due to protocol, host and bandwidth capability. ATTO’s key findings are as follows:

– 20Gbps Thunderbolt 2 technology‐enabled devices are backwards compatible with 10Gbps Thunderbolt technology‐enabled hosts. It works!

– Overall aggregate performance for Thunderbolt 2 is the same as Thunderbolt.

– A single Thunderbolt 2 or multiple DP1.1a connections will support 4K video performance.

– Overall storage throughput still depends on the quantity and types of drives that are connected.

– It’s not practical to daisy chain a 4K monitor and high‐speed storage. Independent connections are required!

You can download ATTO’s guide, ‘What is Thunderbolt 2? How does it compare to Thunderbolt?’ here.

Want to know more about Thunderbolt, ATTO solutions and the new Mac Pro? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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The Mac Pro is finally here!

The Mac Pro is finally here!

Far and away the most anticipated of Apple’s October releases, the Mac Pro has been occupying an unhealthy amount of our thoughts since it was first unveiled back in June.

The round design means it not only looks great on your desk, but also enables a new cooling system that’s going to keep your Mac Pro near-silent (it’s an evolution of the system that’s been used in the most recent iteration of MacBook Pros). And Sonnet are already working on rackmount solutions that take the new shape into account, which is reassuring to know.

Spec-wise, you’re getting an Intel Xeon E5 chip that’s capable of supporting up to 12 cores, four DDR3 memory slots and the flash storage has a top read speed of 1.25GBps, meaning it’s similar to Steve Wozniack’s latest, the iOFX and up to ten times faster than a 7200 rpm SATA hard drive.

Next up on was the memory, which uses 1866MHz DDR3 ECC. Configurable to 64GB, you’re getting up to 60GBps bandwidth in a four-channel controller. Completely accessible by the user, this is also the fastest ECC memory available.

The native GPUs are dual AMD FirePro cards, capable of delivering up to 7 TFLOPS of power between them and capable of driving native 4K displays.

The six Thunderbolt 2 ports mean you can daisy chain up to 36 devices to your Mac Pro (6 per port), and that’s before you even go near the four USB 3 ports, two Gigabit Ethernet ports, HDMI and Line out connections. In fact, Apple very clearly aimed this at anyone working on high end video and with a 4k workflow because the Mac Pro can deal with up to three 4K displays, single and dual-input displays, and the HDMI 1.4 port supports 4K TVs.

From a storage point of view, Mac Pro will now boast Apple’s latest PCIe-based flash storage, and can be configured up to 1TB, with a standard configuration of 256GB.

Mac Pro 2013 key specs:

• 256GB (configurable up to 1TB)
• 12GB DDR3 3CC memory (configurable up to 64GB)
• Dual AMD FirePro D300 or D500 graphics cards as standard
• 3.7GHz Intel Xeon E5 quad core (configurable to 2.7GHz 12 core)
• 6x Thunderbolt 2.0 ports

Want to be one of the first to see the new Mac Pro in action? Register now for one of our December launch events.

Want to know more about the new Mac releases? Give us a call on 03333 409 306 or email sales@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest Apple news, read our roundup post, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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Avid’s list of Pro Tools HD 11-qualified Macs

Avid’s list of Pro Tools HD 11-qualified Macs

Before you make the move to Avid Pro Tools 11, it’s definitely worth checking your Apple hardware is up to the job. Luckily, Avid have compiled a full list of Apple computers that are approved for use with Pro Tools HDX and Pro Tools HD Native systems with Pro Tools HD 11.0 software for Mac OS X 10.8.3 and later.

With the arrival of the Magma ExpressBox 3T Thunderbolt to PCIe expansion chassis, you’re no longer even tied down to just the mighty Mac Pro, but also able to leverage iMac, MacBook Pro and even some of the more powerful MacBook Airs and Mac minis. So without further ado, here’s Avid’s full list of Pro Tools HDX and HD Native with Pro Tools HD 11-qualified Macs…

Desktops

Supported:

– Mac Pro mid-2012, 2010 & 2009 5,1

– Mac Pro early 2009 4,1

Not Supported:

– Mac Pro 3,1 ‘Harpertown’ models and lower

Optional: Magma ExpressBox 7 (EB7) PCIe Host-to-PCIe Expansion Chassis

Laptops

MacBook Pro and MacBook Air with Magma ExpressBox 3 (EB3T) Thunderbolt-to-PCIe Expansion Chassis. Supported:

– MacBook Pro Retina 15-inch (Mid 2012: 10,1)

– MacBook Pro Retina 13-inch (Late 2012: 10,2)

– MacBook Pro 15-inch (Mid 2012: 9,1)

– MacBook Pro 13-inch (Mid 2012: 9,2)

– MacBook Air 2012 5,2 i7 (i5 models not supported)

Mac mini

Mac mini with Magma ExpressBox 3 (EB3T) for HDX support and/or HD Native Thunderbolt. Supported:

– Mac Mini 2012 i7 (8GB of RAM required)

iMac

– iMac 2012 13,1 i5

– iMac 2010 11,3 i7

– iMac 2009 11,1 i5

Can’t see your model on there? It’s always worth giving us a call on the details at the bottom to discuss upgrades and what configuration you might need to run Pro Tools 11. Also, check out the system requirements here.

Want to know more about Avid Pro Tools HD 11? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email audio@Jigsaw24.com. You can also follow @Jigsaw24Audio on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook