When does production become post?

When does production become post?

The increasingly common combination of high shoot ratios and tight deadlines puts pressure on facilities to increase efficiencies across production and post. In an effort to reduce turnaround times and cut down the amount of time spent on non-billable activities, production and post teams are now working together from far earlier into the production schedule, with post houses sending staff to set to ensure footage is logged as soon after the shoot as possible, and DITs performing post-critical functions.

Manufacturers are keen to facilitate this collaboration – AJA seem to have kicked off the scramble to unite the two when they released the first Ki Pro back in 2009, and noone seems to have paused for breath since. But there are dozens of factors to consider when planning your workflow, from whether you’ll be handling HDR footage, to IP integration, to the impact of the incoming 5G connectivity standard. With that in mind, we’re taking a look at a few different points of contact, and how you can make sure your workflow there is mutually beneficial for production and post.

Shooting and monitoring

Accurate metadata can speed up post-production immensely, by making it far easier for artists to match the original scene conditions when compositing, compensate for issues with specific cameras or lenses when correcting footage, and more.

Zeiss are currently setting the standard for incredibly detailed metadata with the new eXtended Data lens, the CP.3 XD. As well as giving your DoP precision, quality and all the other benefits of working with Zeiss glass, XD lenses create a huge amount of metadata about each shot, containing details not just of features like focal length and exposure, but details about the lens itself. In post, tweaking this metadata becomes a quicker, easier way to compensate for lens shading, or to correct for the different distortions of individual lenses used in production. When compositing, the metadata drastically cuts down the amount of trial and error (and therefore time) needed for artists to match on-set lighting conditions. This ultimately drives down the time and money needed for post, and so could even help buy you more time on set.

Monitor and recorder manufacturers Atomos have attempted to bring a similar spirit of cooperation to monitoring with their newly announced SUMO 19 HDR production/grading monitor, which can record dailies, proxies or 4Kp60 masters as needed.  This means camera crews can see what they’ve captured in HDR, as it will appear to post teams, and be sure they’re happy with the shot as it appears, rather than having to guess based off a Rec.709 image. The recording feature also means that dailies (or a low res proxy, if you have limited bandwidth/storage) can be send to a post facility immediately, and assembly can begin far earlier than usual.

Solutions like this are making it easier for production and post crews to maintain a common vision of the project throughout, and reduce the time taken to create the final product without limiting either party’s options in that way that, say, Sony baking HLG into footage from some of its lower-end cameras does.

Logging and metadata

Loggers and ingest technicians are increasingly venturing out to log footage as close to set as possible. While data and asset management has been an intrinsic part of post for a long time, it’s now widely acknowledged that by focusing more on this on set, crews can increase the overall efficiency of the project, and drastically reduce the time needed to put everything together in post.

Asset management systems like axle Video are excellent – axle is particularly good if you’re new to this, as you can just point it at your file system and it will automatically index all media files, then update its database automatically in realtime as you add new footage. You can then share low res proxies through a web browser so that people can reject, trim and comment on clips; it’ll even integrate with NLEs so that editors can search new footage without leaving their editing application. It ships with a standard metadata schema, but you can customise this to the requirements of your shoot.

Avid’s MediaCentral | Asset Management option (formerly Avid Interplay MAM) performs a similar function, indexing media in a range of formats and allowing you to add custom metadata in order to make it easier to find. It even allows you to remotely access assets from multiple locations, so if crews at different locations both log footage, all of it will be available for review at the same time. Avid’s MediaCentral system also allows for a high degree of automation when it comes to things like ingest, logging, archiving and sharing footage, meaning you can achieve more in less time, and with a smaller team.

Cloud delivery

Once footage has been logged, it can be sent back to the post facility, or to a staging post if you’re in a remote location. As the available networks have become faster, cloud delivery has gained popularity, whether that’s ENG crews using in-camera FTP capabilities to send footage back to the newsroom, or crews on location leveraging file sharing services to deliver footage to post as quickly as possible. And with 5G set to make 100Mbps over the air file sharing a reality over the next few years, this option is only set to get more popular.

If you’re collecting or monitoring footage from drones, car-mounted cams and other inaccessible recorders, Soliton’s on-camera encoders and receivers are a great investment – they use a mixture of H.265 compression and proprietary RASCOW technology to ensure you see an HD live stream of your footage even in areas where 3G and 4G coverage is patchy, with delays as low as 240 ms.

For reliable file transfer, we’d recommend IBM’s Aspera service. While it’s pricier than WeTransfer, it uses end to end encryption to to keep your footage secure and, unlike consumer services, doesn’t get slower the larger your files are. Another feature we’re particularly keen on is that it calculates the precise time a transfer will take on your current connection before it begins, so if it says a transfer will take seven hours, you can ring ahead and let your colleagues know when to expect the file with a fairly high degree of certainty.

How does this all fit together?

We can help you develop workflows to maximise efficiency in production and post, and advise on ways to prepare your existing infrastructure for the future, or fold new releases into your existing workflow. As well as providing consultancy, workflow design and specialist hardware, we can provide ongoing support and maintenance for your core kit. To find out more, get in touch with the team on the details below.

If you want to know more, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter, or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

IBC 2017: FilmLight releases Baselight 5.0

IBC 2017: FilmLight releases Baselight 5.0

At IBC2017, FilmLight is celebrating the formal release of Baselight 5.0, as well as exhibiting the 5.0 colour tools across its entire product range.

The update includes over 50 features, including a new primary grading environment known as Base Grade, a new Gamut Compression tool for HDR workflows, and new creative tools like  Grid Warp, Paint, Perspective Tracker and Texture Equaliser. get the full details in the press release, below.

 

Offering over 50 new features, version 5.0 has been comprehensively put through its paces over the last year on a variety of real projects with complex workflows. Baselight 5.0 has been at the heart of blockbusters, high-end television series and commercials. The feedback from colourists around the world has been very positive, and the results are stunning.

One of the key features in version 5.0 is Base Grade, a new primary grading environment for modern colour workflows and HDR.

“Base Grade makes you so much faster in matching and creating stunning looks – in a single layer,” said Philipp Horsch, Senior Colourist and CEO at BFS Entertainment GmbH Munich. “The new subdivision of dim/dark shadows and light/bright highlights, each with its own pivot and falloff, basically gives you four keys already integrated in the layer.”

Version 5.0 aims to make grading for HDR even easier with the addition of colour space ‘families’, and the new Gamut Compression tool. It makes moving between colour spaces simple and seamless.

“The new colour space families make delivering diverse masters really easy,” added Horsch. “With 5.0 I can now concentrate exclusively on the creative job and don’t have to worry so much about the colour science.”

“Gamut Compression is so useful, especially when dealing with car commercials, where the LED brake lights often push the saturation too far,” added Mick Vincent, Senior Colourist at The Mill, London. “Baselight 5.0 has been so exciting already, and there are so many more tools to try out – we have a great year ahead of us with this system at our fingertips.”

The addition of many new creative features – including Grid Warp, Paint, Perspective Tracker and Texture Equaliser – have also proven to be very popular.

“Baselight 5.0 has made finishing projects much faster and with less hassle – which is key for television content with a demanding production schedule,” said James Perry, Editor/Colourist on The Dr. Phil Show. “Instead of having to send shots to our graphics department for wire removal or general touch-ups, I can fix them easily in Baselight.”

Martin Tlaskal, Lead Developer at FilmLight, added, “These are just a handful of many comments from talented colourists, who have collaborated with us on the testing and refinement of version 5.0. It is extremely gratifying to know that our ideas have proven so valuable in practice among the creative community.”

With Baselight 5.0 now launched, the new features will soon be deployed across FilmLight’s other BLG-enabled products; Daylight 5.0, the dailies and media management platform, as well as Baselight for Avid 5.0 and Baselight for NUKE 5.0 in the Baselight Editions range, will enter beta after IBC, with Prelight 5.0 to follow soon. FilmLight is showing all of these products at IBC2017 on stand 7.F31.

If you want to know more, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter‘Like’ us on Facebook or take a look at our IBC roundup.

Get HDR ready with the latest from Atomos, Sony, Blackmagic Design and more!

Get HDR ready with the latest from Atomos, Sony, Blackmagic Design and more!

HDR has taken the industry by storm, and makes such a difference to the quality of your images that soon we’ll be wondering how we got by without it. To get the latest tips on getting the most out of your HDR-capable technology, we brought in the experts and laid out the kit for our drop-in session on utilising your Atomos monitor and recorder to create HDR content.

Why is HDR so important?

HDR is arguably the biggest step forward for moving pictures in a generation. New standards set in REC.2100 take advantage of the luminance and colour reproduction capabilities of modern displays to produce high levels of brightness, contrast and colour volume, leading to images that closely resemble what our eyes naturally see.

Content producers have long been working with high dynamic range source material through Log and RAW captured images. But output and delivery standards haven’t progressed much for decades, meaning we’ve spent years compromising. HDR is a new way forward as it is a resolution independent technology, with the new standards outlined in REC.2100 being applicable to both 1080p (HD), UltraHD and 4K – even 8K come 2020.

Unlike previous technological progression that required significant hardware overhauls, HDR doesn’t require lots of new hardware. The most significant piece of new kit is the display we monitor HDR material on, and how we process the signal to see the images we are creating appropriately. This is where Atomos, one of the fastest growing companies in pro video, are pushing the envelope in the field, on set and in the studio.

Our HDR portfolio

Up your game with Atomos recorders and monitors

We featured a great range of HDR-capable products, and much more at our recent Production Drop in event. We were excited to demo the Sumo On-Set and Studio monitor/recorder, the first production monitor that also records 4K 12-bit Raw, 10-bit ProRes/DNxHR and 1080p60 live switching and recording. With the Sumo, for the first time your on-set production monitors can be HDR capable as well as having recording capabilities.

We also had the Atomos Shogun Inferno monitor/recorder on show, a combination of the most advanced monitor technologies, the latest recording capability, and playback and editing functionality that encourages on set collaboration. Rounding off our Atomos offering was the Ninja Flame monitor/recorder, with its true-to-life vibrant colors, 7″ 10-bit 1500nit panel, AtomHDR engine and HDMI connections to record and play back video to 4K/HD 10-bit ProRes/DNxHR.

Shop Atomos monitors and recorders now!

 

Get HDR ready with our favourite camcorders

Camera-wise, we had some of the newest models to be announced, plus some of our old favourites. The new Canon Cinema EOS C200 camcorder is the latest in the EOS range, big brother to the very popular C100 MK II and following in the footsteps of the C300 MK II. With this camcorder, you can easily capture and record UHD/50P footage to internal SD cards in MP4 format, and use the new Cinema RAW Light codec to film moments in stunning 4K to internal CFast 2.0TM card.

We also showcased the Sony FS5 and FS7 camcorders, both firm favourites with Jigsaw24. The FS7 is a must-have run and gun camera equipped with a Super 35mm CMOS image sensor, while the FS5 is an amazing small form factor, large sensor 4K camera that’s great in terms of weight, balance and ergonomics.

Also on show was the long-awaited Panasonic Lumix GH5, which gives you the highest picture quality in the history of Lumix G compact systems cameras. With its compact design, high frame rate and intuitive controls, the GH5 has been described as a great fit for creative agencies, photographers and videographers. And let’s not forget the Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro 4.6K, a professional digital film camera that combines the incredible image quality of URSA Mini 4.6K with the features and controls of a traditional broadcast camera.

Shop camcorders now!

 

Complete your kit with lenses and lighting

Top of the range lenses and lighting were provided by Zeiss and Cirro Lite, rounding off the perfect shoot setup.

Shop camera accessories now!

 

Our HDR events

If you missed out on our exclusive Atomos and HDR drop-in, we’ve got plenty of upcoming events where you can check out the latest kit. You can have a look at our past events and register for upcoming ones on our Jigsaw24 events page.

 

Still not sure whether you’re ready to commit to purchasing, or have any questions about products that could help you create HDR content? Give us a call on 03332 409 284 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com

 

Panasonic introduce AU-EVA1 at Cine Gear Expo

Panasonic introduce AU-EVA1 at Cine Gear Expo

Panasonic have surprised us with a brand new camera at this year’s Cine Gear Expo. Called the AU-EVA1, it’s a 5.7K EF mount cinema camera that weighs just 1.2kg and shoots to low cost SD cards. 


AU-EVA1_Slant

Positioned between the GH5 and the VariCam LT 4K, the AU-EVA1 is designed for handheld shooting of documentaries, music videos, adverts and the like. The camera’s small size and light weight mean it’s also good for gimbal and rig mounted shooting.

The AU-EVA1 has a 5.7K Super 35mm size sensor, delivering an image that can be sampled down to 4K, UHD, 2K or even 720p. The camera is capable of shooting 10-bit 422, with RAW output to be added in a future update. The AU-EVA1 can shoot 4K 60p and 2K at up to 240p.

Like the Varicam LT, the AU-EVA1 is capable of dual native ISO, a technology that allows you to extract more information from the sensor increasing the level of noise or artefacts in the film, leading to crisper images and better low light performance.

Also imported from the VariCam range is V-Log/V-Gamut capture, which gives you high dynamic range, bolder colours and more realistic skin tones – the log curves of V-Log are reminiscent of those of negative film, and V-Gamut delivers a colour space even larger than that of film.

AU-EVA1_Side

Port-wise, you get 4K HDMI and SDI outputs, plus two balanced XLR audio inputs so you can get professional quality audio.

Prices are yet to be completely confirmed, but Panasonic have promised us a body only camera this autumn for under €8000.

Looking for something similar?

This camera is on the same level as Sony’s FS5 and FS7, and comparable to the also-recently-released Canon C200, (a whole 200g heavier and with Cinema RAW Light support already built in; shoots Full HD at up to 120 fps HFR).

The EVA1 is expected to ship in October, but you can pre-order yours here. If you want to know more, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter, or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

NAB 2017: AJA previews FS-HDR with breakthrough HDR conversion support

NAB 2017: AJA previews FS-HDR with breakthrough HDR conversion support

AJA Video Systems is previewing FS-HDR, an exciting new product delivering breakthrough HDR workflow conversion capabilities. Building on AJA’s flagship FS4, and incorporating the latest HDR technology from Academy and Emmy Award twinning developer Colorfront, FS-HDR provides HDR and Wide Color Gamut (WCG) processing and conversion for realtime 4K/UltraHD and 2K/HD workflows. It will be demonstrated for the first time as a technology preview during NAB 2017 at AJA’s booth, #SL2505.

FS-HDR, a 1RU, rackmount, universal converter/frame synchronizer, is designed specifically to meet the HDR/WCG needs of broadcast, OTT, post and live event AV environments, where real time, low-latency processing, color fidelity and metadata handling are of paramount importance. FS-HDR’s HDR/WCG capabilities leverage video and color space processing algorithms within Colorfront Engine™, specially licensed by AJA from Colorfront, and developed by Colorfront’s CTO Bill Feighter and Lead Engineer Tamas Perlaki, both of whom are Academy Award winners.

Powered by Colorfront Engine™, FS-HDR’s extensive HDR and WCG processing support enables the realtime processing of 4K/UltraHD and 2K/HD, including HDR conversions, and 4K/UltraHD HDR down-conversion to HD HDR. FS-HDR also enables the conversion of popular camera formats from multiple vendors into the HDR space, plus conversion to and from BT.2020/BT.709 as needed, critical for the widespread acceptance of HDR alongside SDR in broadcast and OTT workflows.

“Our AJA FS family of products have been incredibly popular in delivering ultra reliable video and audio conversion needs for anything that comes up on-set, in an OB truck, at a facility or in a live event production scenario,” said Nick Rashby, President, AJA Video Systems. “There has been a rising demand from these markets for a path to support HDR workflows. Partnering with Colorfront is enabling us to solve our customers’ HDR workflow requirements today, backed by Academy Award-winning engineering!”
“AJA’s professional video solutions already provide robust, powerful and cost effective video output for our On-Set Dailies, Express Dailies and Transkoder products,” said Aron Jaszberenyi, Managing Director of Colorfront. “In choosing the new FS-HDR solution with Colorfront Engine™, AJA customers will instantly access many years of Colorfront’s leading-edge research into SDR/HDR and camera output format conversion, plus a sophisticated tone mapping toolset, which delivers technically-accurate and visually pleasing results that retain the creative intent of the original material.”
FS-HDR features will include:

– Realtime HDR to HDR, HDR to SDR and SDR to HDR conversions including BT.2020 to BT.709 color space conversion
Inputs
– SDR BT.709 100 Nits
– PQ BT.2020 1000 Nits
– PQ P3D65 1000 Nits
– Hybrid Log Gamma BT.2100
– Sony® S-Gamut3/SLog-3
– ARRI® Log C Wide Gamut
– Panasonic V-Log
– RED® Log3G10 Wide Gamut
– Canon Log 2
Outputs
– SDR BT.709 100 Nits
– PQ BT.2020 1000 Nits
– Hybrid Log Gamma BT.2100
– Support for two modes:
– Single channel mode for 4K/UltraHD or 2K/HD frame sync and conversion including HDR conversions.
– Four channel mode for simultaneous independent 2K/HD/SD channels for standard conversion and frame sync workflows.
– 4K/UltraHD/2K/HD/SD video processing and up, down, cross-conversion.
– A full range of I/O options for 4K/UltraHD including Quad 1.5G; Dual 3G; and Quad 3G, 6G and 12G over a range of SDI and optional fiber choices.
– SMPTE 2SI I/O support for broad compatibility with 4K/UltraHD devices.
– Four-channel 2K/HD/SD video processing and conversion.
– 4K/UltraHD/2K/HD/SD up, down, cross-conversion.
– SD/SD aspect ratio conversion.
– HD/HD cross-conversion (720p/1080i).
– A 1RU frame offering space, power and cost efficiencies ideal for broadcast trucks, and post production or broadcast settings.
– Audio I/O processing with a 272×208 matrix of audio possibilities; support for a flexible range of audio feeds from discrete AES to MADI and embedded SDI audio, with each audio input offering sample-rate conversion.
– Simple operation, a redesigned menu structure and quick access to features via front panel buttons, as well as a web-based UI offering control over a LAN or across the web.

FS-HDR is being demonstrated as a technology preview only. Pricing and availability details will be coming soon. For additional information about AJA’s existing line of FS products, please visit: www.aja.com/family/fs.

If you want to know more on the biggest and best NAB Show releases, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter‘Like’ us on Facebook or take a look at our roundup post.

It’s time to get HDR-ready

It’s time to get HDR-ready

Remember 2010, when we were all very excited about shooting in native 3D? Well, I think we can all agree that that trend is now dying a death, and ceding its Cool Trend crown to High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery. However, HDR is different. Rather than a hyped up flash in the pan, it’s actually offering something that filmmakers have been clamouring for – a return to filmic production values, without losing the agility of digital shooting. 

So what exactly do you need to know before you wade into the world of HDR content production? Can you shoot it with your current kit? And what does it really mean for your images? We asked our production team to give us the lay of the land.

First, for the newcomers: what is HDR?

So, the human eye has a functional range of roughly 100,000 nit from the darkest to brightest light it can perceive detail in, and the lens of a camera has a similar range. Until now, however, image processing, transmission and display technologies have reduced this range, meaning bright and dark objects that were perfectly visible to the naked eye appeared clipped or burned in a captured image. You could expose for the highlights and lose detail in the shadows, or expose for shadow but lose detail in the highlights, but there was no way to capture detail in both.

An HDR workflow preserves this full range from capture through transmission, all the way to final display, so your final image has the full dynamic range of the human eye, and therefore appears much more realistic and immersive, as shown in our illustration (alas, this will only work if you’re viewing this on an HDR-ready display). You’ll see more vivid colours, and more detail in shadows.

HDR

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-08 at 11.29.08

But to give some sense of the scale of this change, the brightest possible pixel on an HDR display is about 40 times what it used to be on an SD display, and when you’re working with an HDR image in post, you can tweak brightness levels pixel by pixel.

However, to get the full effect of HDR, you need more than a camera with a lot of latitude. For example, without support for a wide colour gamut, you won’t see as much colour variation in the newly visible section of your image. Support for high frame rates is also recommended, and you’ll need support for 10- or 12-bit capture too, depending on which version of HDR you’re working with.

There are competing versions of HDR?

Yep. The current frontrunner is HDR10, as it’s been picked up by various gaming platforms. Also popular is the more detailed Dolby Vision. The image displayed by Dolby Vision is ‘scene referred’, which means it varies from scene to scene, working with your display to adjust each image. By contrast, HDR10 is static.

Most consumer displays rely on Hybrid Log Gamma, an electronic-optical transfer function protocol  that combines standard gamma with log to create (wait for it) a hybrid that extends traditional gamma beyond the standard curve. Any TV can display HLG, as it displays the standard gamma. TVs brighter than 100 nits (i.e. most LCDs) will then display more highlight information until it reaches its point of maximum brightness, when it’ll clip.

Which of these is the one my smartphone camera can do?

Neither. The ‘HDR’ advertised on smartphones is actually HDR-I, which uses tone mapping to give the impression that you’re seeing images with a higher dynamic range than you are. This is not the same as the true HDR you’ll be capturing on a pro camera for a production workflow.

So what qualifies a camera as being capable of shooting real HDR?

There are several features that your camera needs to qualify as HDR-capable, but the main ones are:

– 10-bit capture to Log or RAW. As a minimum, your camera needs to support ProRes or DNX 10-bit 4.2.2., but don’t feel like you have to stop there. The more bits the better, really.

– Plenty of latitude. Canon’s C300 MkII is being touted as having 15 stops, which is ideal, but the Sony FS7 and FS5 both have 14, and if you have a C500 in your arsenal, that still has a perfectly respectable 12 stops of dynamic range.

– S-Log3/C-LOG 3 capture capability; if you are shooting RAW and recording to Log over SDI, this needs to be 10-bit. 12-bit CinemaDNG capture is also good.

– Rec2020 gamut support.

Your existing camera may already be able to record S-Log3 with the help of an external recorder. (The Atomos Flame and Inferno series are a good bet for this, as they incorporate high quality HDR-ready monitors so you can see your footage accurately on set.)

Which cameras are HDR-ready?

Several such cameras are on, or at least making their way to, the market, but as we mentioned earlier, our favourites among the current crop are Canon’s C500 and C300 MK II, Sony’s FS7 and FS5, and the Panasonic GH4 and GH5. All of these cameras output a RAW signal that can be recorded as ProRes or DNX with the help of external recorder, and all have LOG gamma encoding.

Apart from a camera and maybe an external recorder, what else will I need?

In order to see what you’re doing with your HDR images in post, you will need a monitor that can support HDR. Currently, the simplest and most affordable are the Atomos Flame and Inferno ranges, which offer on-camera HDR monitoring combined with the ability to play back and edit your footage at full res, making a collaborative HDR workflow possible for everyone on set. If you’ve already invested in a Atomos Ninja Assassin, Blade HD, Flame, Shogun or Shogun Inferno, HDR support is available as a free upgrade, but as their screens only hit 500 nit, you won’t be able to see more than seven or eight stops of dynamic range; the newer monitors are 1500 nit and showcase 10 stops.

When it comes to post-production, we can’t in good conscience recommend grading on anything less than DaVinci Resolve. Its ability to power through high resolution and frame rate files without slowing down or falling over is going to be extremely necessary if you’re going to be tackling HDR, and it features the industry’s most advanced and sensitive HDR toolkit. The ability to grade a project for multiple colourspaces at the same time is going to come in handy until you’re delivering HDR 4K all the time, too.

Will my current infrastructure be OK?

To be honest, that depends how much 4K work you’ve done so far, and how many changes you’ve made to accommodate it. That 10-bit workflow with its attendant file sizes and frame rates means you’re going to want to be working on a 10Gb Ethernet network, rather than the standard 1GbE.

You’ll also want to make sure you have plenty of high capacity storage both at your facility and on set. One of the reasons we’re so keen on Atomos devices is that they’ve teamed up with G-Technology to develop the Master Caddy range. These high capacity SSDs can slot into any compatible Atomos recorder to capture your footage, then be removed and inserted in to an adaptor that makes them compatible with G-DOCK and ev series storage from G-Technology, so there’s no need for you to invest in proprietary recording media that’ll only work with one of your cameras (you’ll get better speeds and capacities this way, too).

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

IBC Show: Sony unveil “transformational” advances in IP workflows

IBC Show: Sony unveil “transformational” advances in IP workflows

Today, Sony unveiled how it is reshaping the field of media solutions, introducing new ideas, approaches and technology on the opening day of IBC 2016.

Sony’s announcements at IBC explore how its innovations in the fields of image, IP and media workflow are helping broadcasters rethink the ways audiences and production teams alike engage and interact with creators and their content. Sony also showcased how its ‘Beyond Definition’ vision and rich technology heritage serve as the foundation for exciting new consumer experiences and a range of business opportunities for media organisations.

“Sony is committed to exceeding our customer expectations” said Adam Fry, Vice President, Sony Professional Solutions Europe. “The Image, IP and Workflow innovations we’re demonstrating at IBC show how we’re continuously reshaping our technology and services to exceed the demands of the ever-changing media industry. From sensors to full blown Media Operations Management,” continued Adam Fry, “Sony is continuing its mission to unleash the incredible power of images, through innovative technologies and with great people.”

End to end production workflow for HDR and SDR production

Creating lifelike images involves more than just resolution: content creators familiar with the production of higher resolution 4K images are now turning to areas such as High Dynamic Range (HDR) to improve the viewer experience even further and create more long term asset value. Throughout IBC Sony will present the benefits of an end-to-end HDR production workflow across different production needs including, live sports production and program production:

4K Live sports: HDR is a game changer

Sony is introducing the HDRC-4000 HDR production converter unit that fills in a missing piece of 4K HDR and HD SDR simultaneous live production workflow. Based on Sony’s recommended S-Log3 and BT.2020 production workflow in 4K HDR live production, the unit is able to do real-time conversions to the appropriate delivery formats for various applications (broadcast, OTT, public viewing), as well as formats for input (OETF/EOTF, colour space, HDR/SDR and resolution), including conventional HD content production, and video signals apart from S-Log3 (Hybrid Log Gamma, ST.2084) without compromising picture quality.

It eliminates the need for independent workflows for HDR and SDR on the same event and saving a production time and money. This innovative end-to-end workflow solution for 4K HDR Live Production is introduced as “SR Live for HDR”. This enables broadcasters to enjoy outstanding HDR image production as well as conventional 4K SDR and HD production.

4K Program production: XAVC allows excellent HDR capture in S-Log3

The version eight firmware update for F55 and F5 (PMW-F5 requires CBKZ-55FX installed) enables support for XAVC 4K Class 480 recording, enabling a higher bit rate, and capture of excellent HDR in S-Log3. XAVC allows for reviewing of images captures immediately after shooting on-site, making it ideal for HDR production of documentaries and natural history programmes.

4K OLED Monitor for HDR production

Sony has two 4K OLED monitors capable for HDR production. Both are high performance TRIMASTER EL OLED monitors providing professional quality black performance, colour reproduction, quick pixel response, and accurate signal processing. They also support high dynamic range mode and a wide colour gamut conforming to DCI-P3 and most of the ITU-R BT.2020 Recommendation.

BVM-X300, an award-winning 30-inch 4K OLED Master monitor, the flagship model in its professional monitor line-up will feature updated Version 2 firmware including additional HDR EOTF and function support, a new hardware with an HDMI input for easy connection to cameras or Blu-ray players, and a second 3G/HD-SDI 4K input for simpler system integration.

The PVM-X550, 55-inch 4K OLED picture monitor offers a large 3840 x 2160 pixels high-grade picture for critical monitoring performance. A Quad view display mode allows individual picture settings for each display quadrant.

Enhancing solutions for an IP Live system that is ready today, open for tomorrow

Sony further demonstrated its commitment to leading an industry-wide shift to interoperable IP. A core part of Sony’s strategy is its commitment to deliver fully interoperable solutions & systems that are ready to implement today, using current available standards while remaining open to upcoming future standards.

Sony has played a strong role in the industry since 2012, starting from the Joint Taskforce for Networked Media (JT-NM), later joining the ASPEN and AIMS alliance groups, and more recently the AMWA NMI incubator project, driving the development of the Networked Media Interface framework.

Sony’s persistent advances support of open protocols is what cements Sony’s place as a technology innovator and leader in interoperability. Sony has disclosed technical specification of related NMI technology components to the SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers) as a Registered Disclosure Document (RDD): Essence Independent Mapping (RDD40), LLVC (RDD34) & NDCP (RDD38).

Working together to lead the industry towards interoperability, the expansion of the IP Live Alliance includes the addition of four new members: Asaca Corporation, ASTRODESIGN,Inc. , Lambda Systems Inc. and Studer by Harman.

Sony also introduced several new products that are built around its Network Media Interface (NMI):

NXLK-IP45F, a new AV Multiplexer/DeMultiplexer board enables to multiplex and de-multiplex video and audio over IP signals, with an SDI signal output that includes embedded audio.

NXL-IP4F, an SDI-IP Converter Unit ideal for 4K/HD standalone source or destination to integrate with an IP-based Production System.

HKCU-IP43F, an NMI board for HDCU-4300 camera control system enables easy connection to the IP Live System network.

XKS-Q8111 and XKS-Q8166, an NMI supported QSFP+ I/O board (output) for XVS switchers that allows the direct connection to the core switch of an IP Live System network using 40Gbps fiber link.

PWA-MV1N, Multi-viewer Software enables a very efficient monitoring solution into an IP Live Production Infrastructure, reducing drastically the video matrix resources used for monitoring.

Sony is taking action to bridge the gap to IP Live by providing a venue for training and education. In June 2016, Sony opened a unique facility in the UK, the Digital Motion Picture Centre IP Live at Pinewood Studios. This landmark centre provides educational resources, training and practical tools to aid the excellence and growth in IP for broadcasters and productions companies alike.

Since its opening in June this year, Sony has trained numerous people from leading broadcasters, enabling them to go beyond isolated proof of concept demonstrations and theory to experience interoperable products in a functioning live environment and upskill to become the professionals of tomorrow.

Transforming production and distribution workflows

Sony also emphasised its pledge to working with media organisations as a strategic business partner, evolving their production and distribution workflows to help them transform across various production platforms. Specifically focusing in on news production, Sony also introduced a number of solutions and services that add intelligence and greater communication between the on-field camera and the news centre.

XDCAM Air, harnessing the power of cloud computing and XDCAM: XDCAM Air services address the growing need for speed to air. Harnessing the power of cloud computing and the strengths of Sony’s XDCAM solutions, operators now have the ability to work more quickly and efficiently, concentrating on the story at hand, with the camera directly hooked into the workflow.

XDCAM Air is a portal for content workflows with intelligent functions such as new mobile applications, content management by metadata automation, connection control using GPS geo-location and distribution to multiple locations. Additionally, XDCAM Air will be interoperable with most of major systems, both from Sony and 3rd parties

Sony’s Media Backbone Hive introduced to European broadcasters: Media Backbone Hive utilises the latest IT technologies built using datacentre infrastructure to deliver a complete news and sport production workflow. Showcasing a range of intuitive web-based applications, Hive exists to deliver fast ‘Omni-media’ publishing serving all Web, mobile and social media as well as traditional TV playout. It gives access to clever and tailored dashboards that can inform business decisions, delivering efficiencies driven by insight.

Hive gives media companies the opportunity to truly excel in content creation by empowering their creative teams. Hive is dynamically scalable, drives better management of operational costs, as well as lowering total cost of ownership and avoiding unnecessary investment in underutilised resource.

Protecting, preserving and preparing content with scalable asset management

To meet the ever-growing demands for managing, storing and repurposing digital content, Sony introduced robust, long-term solutions that maximise flexibility, scalability, reliability, and performance.

Media Backbone NavigatorX, an upgraded version of Sony’s Media Navigator solution, offers new features to deliver easier, quicker and more efficient asset and workflow management. Building on the launch of Media Navigator last year, Media Backbone NavigatorX has been designed based on customer feedback to suit multiple modern workflow environments. Users will be able to manage content assets in a range of formats, with flexible feature options for production, archiving and workflow automation. Media Backbone NavigatorX features a simple user interface and is HTML-based web application compatible with multiple browsers.

Launched in April 2016, Sony’s second generation Optical Disc Archive system provides a secure long term archive on a proven format, the disc. This newest media is rated with a 100 year shelf life, achieve 3.3TB as a capacity of a single cartridge with affordable price. Optical Disc Archive System has higher accessibility than other general archive media and able to use for several workflow like exchange media, project backup and nearline archive. Additionally, Memnon Archiving Services (a member of the Sony group) offers large-scale audiovisual archive digitalisation for wider archiving projects. Further demonstrating Sony’s commitment to securing precious data and investments for generations to come.

For more on the latest IBC releases, take a look at our roundup post, give us a call on 03332 409 306, email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com or pop your details in the form below. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Everything you need to know about atomOS 5.2

Everything you need to know about atomOS 5.2

Atomos have dropped their latest software update, atomOS 5.2, and it’s one of their biggest feature updates to date.

HDR is one of the biggest steps forward in video production for a generation, with Atomos bringing AtomHDR and Log-to-Rec709 monitoring features to the award-winning Ninja Blade and Samurai Blade with atomOS 5.2. HDR means better quality pixels, pushing the boundaries of conventional capture and display capability, and bridging the gap between what we see on a screen and reality as we see it with our own eyes.

Any Log-capable camera is suitable for HDR production, and with the release of AtomOS 5.2, users of HD cameras can now unleash the true potential of their kit while benefiting from advanced waveform tools to assist in the accurate exposure of Log images for HDR content. Users also have built-in camera Log-to-Rec709 LUTs, ideal for when not shooting for HDR.

Here’s a quick rundown of the new features included in AtomOS 5.2:

– Addition of AtomHDR monitoring including HDR waveform functions.

– HDR, Log to Rec.709 and Native Video Source monitor modes (touch the new yellow “Monitor” button on screen).

– HDR mode contains a slider to adjust the number of stops over SDR (Standard Dynamic Range, or Rec709) being displayed on the monitor. Stops beyond +3.0 (800% Rec709) above SDR are possible but a warning will be displayed due to the darkening image on screen. This is a limitation of the 400nit brightness capability of the Blade screen.

– While in AtomHDR mode, a simplified HDR waveform line has been added to easily set the correct slider position for the dynamic range of the scene.

– HDR monitoring and Log-to-Rec709 monitoring is supported for the Log output from the following cameras: Sony, Canon, Panasonic, Arri, JVC and RED.

AtomOS 5.2 is free to all existing Ninja Blade and Samurai Blade users and can be downloaded from www.atomos.com/support by clicking on the respective Ninja Blade or Samurai Blade product link.

For more information on atomOS 5.2 and HDR, email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com or call 03332 409 306. For everything else, ‘like’ us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @WeAreJigsaw24.

Sony goes Beyond Definition at NAB 2016

Sony goes Beyond Definition at NAB 2016

At NAB 2016, Sony is showcasing new technologies and workflows for HD, 4K, high dynamic range, storage and IP transmission, providing the tools to drive professionals’ creativity. Sony’s exhibit will feature new models and updates to widely used products – camcorders, cameras, monitors, switchers, storage, archiving, and wireless transmission for broadcast, production, sports, live events and more.

“Sony at NAB 2016 is all about accelerating the momentum with our customers. For the past two years, we have been showcasing and delivering a variety of forward thinking solutions under the banner of Beyond Definition. This year we are continuing that story and sharing with our partners and customers our latest developments in the core enabling areas of Image, IP and Workflow, all founded on Sony’s reputation as a technology innovator, solutions provider and strategic business partner, that goes beyond the traditional vendor / customer relationship”, says Michael Harrit, Marketing Director Media Solutions, Sony Professional Solutions Europe.

At NAB, Sony will highlight its comprehensive and growing line of cameras, with 4K available at every level from full-frame interchangeable lens cameras and compact professional camcorders to high frame rate, high dynamic range studio and motion picture cameras.

Cameras and camcorders

Sony cameras are used in every production genre at every budget level: high-end feature films, low to mid-budget feature films, news, documentary, episodic television, sports, commercials, OTT and more.

Sony’s new HDC-4800 camera system combines 4K resolution with enhanced high frame rate capabilities — 8x at 4K, and up to 16x in full HD. This is combined with HD cut-out and zoom capabilities for live sports and event production. The HDC-4800 is complemented by the BPU-4800, a baseband processor unit with a replay server capability that creates a fully networked, 4K live ultra-high speed production workflow.

The HDC-4800 uses a new Super 35mm 4K CMOS sensor and wide color space (BT.2020 and BT.709). It supports PL mount lenses enabling to capture high resolution, clear and crisp images for live sports shooting. In addition to this, HDR support is under development and will be available in near future.

Sony introduced the world’s first 4K XDCAM shoulder-mount camcorder, the PXW-Z450. Capable of capturing superb 4K (3840 x 2160) picture quality from new 2/3-type Exmor R CMOS sensor, the camcorder possesses exceptional weight balance and low power consumption alongside excellent networking features. Another addition to the XDCAM family is the PXW-Z150 with 1.0-type sensor that delivers low-light performance and networking features for fast turnaround, high-quality workflows.

IP Transmission

Sony further enhances its fully interoperable IP Live Production system with Networked Media Interface (NMI) IP Live Production system with Networked Media Interface (NMI). The new suite of solutions have been developed to help broadcasters make the most of IP technology, allowing them to deliver on the increasing demand for 4K live content while addressing the cost and scalability issues associated with conventional SDI live production workflows. Sony will be demonstrating its continued commitment to delivering IP interoperability among a wide range of compatible live production products through its IP Live Alliance. The Alliance has, with the recent participation by Grass Valley, now grown to 49 vendors across the live production space, and support is continuing to grow as more broadcasters adopt IP Live.

Storage

Sony is unveiling the second generation of its Optical Disc Archive (ODA) System, which adopts new, high-capacity optical media developed jointly by Sony and Panasonic. This affordable new media is rated with a 100-year shelf life and doubles the capacity of a single cartridge to 3.3 TB. The Generation 2 ODA System also introduces the world’s first 8-channel optical drive unit, doubling the read/write speeds of the previous generation and helping to meet the data needs of real-time 4K production.

ODA technology is designed for use as a near-line, deep archive storage or disaster recovery systems, ranging from large scalable robotics down to stand-alone archive systems. Sony is also embracing an open platform approach for broad compatibility, providing technologies and support to encourage other manufacturers to develop complementary products for the technology. Currently, 42 companies have announced their support for ODA.

High Dynamic Range (HDR)

At NAB 2015, Sony introduced its first 4K OLED reference monitor for critical viewing – the BVM-X300. Already, it’s become the de facto reference standard for 4K and HDR grading.

This year, Sony adds a new monitor – the PVM-X550, a 55-inch, OLED panel with 12-bit signal processing, perfect for client viewing. The PVM-X550 supports HDR through various Electro-Optical Transfer Functions (EOTF), such as S-Log3, SMPTE ST.2084 and Hybrid Log-Gamma, covering applications for both cinematography and broadcast. The PVM-X550 is the world’s first quad-view OLED monitor, which allows customized individual display settings across four distinct views in HD. It is equipped with the same signal-processing engine as the BVM-X300, providing a 12-bit output signal for the best picture accuracy and consistency. It also supports various industry standard color spaces including the wider ITU-R BT.2020 for Ultra High Definition. These all work in tandem with TRIMASTER EL technology to ensure that professionals across the broadcast and cinematography industries are provided excellent, vibrant and reliable images.

Technology Upgrades

Sony is helping customers extend the life of their current Sony technologies by continually introducing new upgrades, enabling new features and performance. These include:

– BVM-X300 – update for support of both Hybrid Log-Gamma formats, safe and aspect markers, XYZ color modulation and 1.5G dual link inputs.
– F55 – version 8 adds support for XAVC 4K class 480, for professionals that want a higher data rate in XAVC.
– FS7 – adds center crop functionality, a feature traditionally found on higher-end models like the F55, flexible spot focus and true 24P.
– FS5 – adding RAW external recording and auto variable ND filters, among several other features.

Wireless mic systems

Rounding out the total workflow for professionals, Sony’s NAB 2016 exhibit also highlights new wireless microphone systems with enhanced diversity features, solutions for media asset management, and more, across its entire product line. These include HXC-FB75 Camera – a successor model to Sony’s HXC-D70, the HXC-FB75 is a cost-effective entry-level studio camera. No camera adapter is required for fiber transmission to the CCU, and Sony’s HDVF interface enables smoother and sharper focusing. The lens, viewfinder and microphone packaged model is available in addition to the camera body sole model.

In response to the growing demand for 4K production and IP interfaces, Sony is adding to its multi-format switcher line-up. Sony’s new XVS Series Switchers, the XVS-7000 and XVS-6000 join the XVS-8000 to create the family of 4K/IP professional production switcher systems. The XVS Series inherits versatile features from Sony’s widely used MVS Series of switchers including enhanced frame memory, format conversion, multi-viewer capabilities, and a wide range of input and output video formats. The XVS Series also supports HDR imaging. Users can configure SDI and IP option boards in a single processor. The XVS family offers smooth migration not only from SDI to IP, but also from HD to 4K, promising efficient return of investment:

– XVS-7000 supports: In HD, 6ME operation with 112 inputs; in 4K,3ME operations with 28 inputs
– XVS-6000 supports: In HD, 4ME operation with 48 inputs; in 4K, 2ME operation with 12 inputs

Sony’s XDCAM technology is a standard for ENG and field production, evolving from optical disc to file-based workflows. Sony is developing new wireless workflows to support the current requirements of news production, using 4G/LTE networks for media delivery. XDCAM Air is a cloud-based ENG service that integrates existing Sony wireless solutions and adds new features such as a mobile application, live streaming edit integration with NLE and enhanced remote control capabilities.

Sony’s new UWP-D Wireless Microphone System, the URX-P03D is the first 2-channel portable receiver in its UWP-D series, eliminating the need to attach two receivers on a camcorder, especially smaller models, making them unbalanced and unwieldy. The URX-P03D receiver supports an external input for an additional wired microphone, such as Sony’s BMP type lavaliere microphones or conventional plug-in-power supported microphones. 3-channel mixer function is included for switching audio signals in the receiver. A new 2-channel version of Sony’s Multi Interface (MI) shoe adaptor, model SMAD-P3D is available for the URX-P03D.

Also introduced, Sony’s LMD-B170 a 17-inch, lightweight, compact Full HD LCD monitor. The new monitor incorporates features and designs from Sony’s PVM-A Series OLED and LMD-A Series Premium LCD picture monitors to give users a familiar interface, especially when using multiple series of monitors. The LMD-B170 can be wall-mounted for in-house use or used as a field monitor with DC power. Interfaces include SDI, HDMI and composite video with stereo analog audio as standard. The monitor also has 2W+2W front stereo speakers, more powerful than a monaural speaker or a rear speaker system.

For more on the latest NAB Show releases, take a look at our roundup post, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Blackmagic Design ship Ursa Mini 4.6K and Micro Cinema Camera

Blackmagic Design ship Ursa Mini 4.6K and Micro Cinema Camera

Blackmagic Design have announced that they’re due to start shipping their Ursa Mini 4.6K camera and Micro Cinema Camera. This means that if you’ve pre-ordered your Ursa Mini 4.6K or Micro Cinema Camera from us, it should be on its way to you soon. However, there is one catch: they’re shipping without global shutter.

ursa_mini_4_6k

As Grant Petty himself explains in this (sadly unembeddable) video, “We’ve been having problems with the global shutter feature of these cameras and it’s been holding up our ability to ship them… As performance is not to the level we’ve been striving for, we’ve decided to ship the cameras without the global shutter feature.

“This is upsetting for us because we really wanted to produce a high dynamic range camera that had a global shutter in an all in one design,” he admits, but points out that users can now choose between the Ursa Mini 4K if they’re working on fast-moving projects like sports coverage and want 60fps 4K, or opt for the 4.6K if their priority is to get that high dynamic range.

Apparently, a 4.6K model being used with global shutter would have been capped at 30fps and have had its dynamic range reduced slightly, effectively rendering it the same as the Mini 4K, so at least this way you’re getting your full 15 stops.

If you head over to the Ursa Mini section of Blackmagic’s site, you can download a short film that Grant and co shot with the Ursa Mini 4.6K, and even download RAW files of the shoot so that you can try grading it in DaVinci Resolve. (The free version of Resolve is available here; Grant recommends working in this so that your RAW files don’t get clipped.)

You can see the full Blackmagic Design camera range here. Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.