Implementing live video streaming with TriCaster at IGN

Implementing live video streaming with TriCaster at IGN

IGN are the world’s largest video games website, and the destination for anyone looking for the latest gaming news (as well as film, TV and comics coverage). Realising the massive impact video was having on the industry, and how their audience consume content, IGN thought it was time they got on board with video at their UK office, installing a new studio based on NewTek TriCaster that would help them deliver professional-quality live video streaming in limited space.

Watch the video below to see the IGN guys and their new NewTek TriCaster video studio in action (including a TriCaster 460 with control surface, separate Yamaha MG166-c audio mixer, Canon XF300 and Canon XF305 cameras, and an Ianiro Florescent lighting rig). For the full case study write-up from NewTek, click here.

NewTek TriCaster on Jigsaw24

Want to know more about NewTek TriCaster? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Education app of the week: Green Screen for iPad

Education app of the week: Green Screen for iPad

Green screen, or chromakeying, techniques have long been popular in the classroom as a way to encourage students to engage with storytelling through role play, and DoInk’s Green Screen app for iPad is an effective and very affordable way of getting started.

What is Green Screen for iPad?

The Green Screen app (DoInk, £1.99) lets you take video from your iPad’s Camera Roll or capture it through the app, then superimpose it on top of other video or still images to create virtual backdrops. It’s really simple to use, and anyone who’s familiar with working with video tracks in iMovie’s timeline should have no problem getting to grips with Green Screen.

Green Screen for iPad

How can it benefit the classroom?

Being able to place yourself in a scene of your own choosing is a great way to fire up students’ imagination. For example, you could recreate a historical scene to engage students with a particular time period in history, get them to play out a scene from a classic novel, create a setting for a news story – the list of creative possibilities is endless.

What’s the best feature?

One great feature of the app is having the ability to superimpose more than one recording onto the original video. This allows you to create layers or ‘conversations’ between characters. Where I’ve seen this idea work very well is in the languages classroom – imagine a dialogue between speakers of two languages, one translating the other. You could also use this idea to recreate dialogue from literary classics.

Where can I get Green Screen?

Green Screen app (DoInk, £1.99) is available from the App Store on your iPad, or you can also download it from iTunes here. It costs £1.99, but buying it through Apple’s Volume Purchase Programme (VPP) entitles you to a 50% reduction when you buy more than 20 instances of the app, which works out at 99p each.

Want to know more about our favourite apps and Apple iPad for the classroom? Get in touch with the team on 03332 409 333, email learning@Jigsaw24.com, follow @Jigsaw24Edu on Twitter or ‘Like’ our Jigsaw24 Education Facebook page for all the latest technology in education news, reviews and articles.


Studio Lighting for Chromakey

Studio Lighting for Chromakey

When you’re shooting against a chromakey backdrop, good lighting can be the difference between being able to pull a really clean key from your final image and shooting something that’s mostly noise and falls apart as soon as you attempt to do anything to it in post (shooting in 4:2:2 will also help). Here are a few things you’re going to want to keep in mind…

1. Aim for soft, even, overhead lighting

To pull the cleanest possible key from anything shot against a chroma wall, you need your backdrop to be evenly lit, with no obvious of areas of highlight and shadow (any variation will translate to noise in your image, and make it far harder to get usable footage. The easiest way to do this is to light your chromakey backdrop from above, as this will reduce overlap, using a soft light like a KinoFlo or Ianiro 5502 (we actually put together an Ianiro kit specifically for chromakey lighting)

2. Position your subject carefully

You want to keep your subject about two metres away from your chromakey backdrop, because you don’t want their shadow to mess up your carefully balanced backdrop lighting. If you’re working on an infinity curve (a curved green, blue or white backdrop that has no corners and so can be used to give the impression that the space behind your subject goes on forever), you might want to hide their shadow there, too. Using something like a fresnal should help with this – just be careful not to give them bright and shiny legs, as that will look strange.

3. Remember the inverse-square law

There’s a scientific explanation of this that you’re welcome to go and Google, but it practical terms it means that the closer your subject is to your lighting, the brighter their face will be and the darker the backdrop will be, as you have to expose for the subject. The brighter and more headache-inducing your chromakey backdrop is, the easier you’ll find pulling your key, so try and light your subject from as far away as possible without splashing your subject lights over your green screen and creating hotspots.

4. Backlight your subject from above, key from 45 degrees above the eyes and fill from 20 degrees below the eyeline

Like your chromawall, you want to try and light your subject from above. As well as helping you get enough shadow to avoid their face looking completely flat (for classic portrait lighting you want one side of their face to be a stop darker than the other), this will also make it easier to avoid having your subject lighting affect your nice, even backdrop. You can now get flexible lamp arms that will allow you to position your light directly above someone (Dedo’s DSTFX stand is a safe bet), but a ¾ light will do if you don’t have the budget for extra kit. In chroma your back light serves two purposes: cutting down on green fringes (if you’re shooting with a less than ideal camera for chroma) and separating the subject from the background.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ our Facebook page.

Simple Chromakey Setups

Simple Chromakey Setups

Believable chromakey (or Chroma Key) is now not only reliable but, provided it’s used properly, is also pretty attainable in most situations. With this being the case, plenty of manufacturers have begun to produce chromakey kits, which is pushing the technology forward and the price down. So, with the reality that every studio is now able to have a decent and cheap chromakey set-up, the question is no longer “Can we afford a chroma key set-up?” but rather:

“How much should we pay for it and how should we use it properly?”

There are basically two types of chromakey set-ups available at the moment; traditional green screen and reflective. They both work on the same principle of creating super-imposed keys on just one colour channel, R, G, or B.  Green (sometimes blue) is normally chosen as it is a less common wardrobe choice and modern cameras are generally more sensitive to green, meaning a higher level of accuracy can be achieved. Green and blue are also considered the colours least like skin-tone.

The subject then stands in front of a matte background of the selected colour and the signal is altered to replace that colour with an alternative signal – a nice weather map for example!

The signal alteration can be done in post-production through software with various editing packages and plug-in software solutions, but for live productions the foreground and background video must be combined using a hardware keyer.

And there it is – it’s as simple as that! Well, sort of…

Back to the two main types of chromakey set-ups. In a traditional green screen set-up the subject is in front of a bright green background. Set up correctly, this can produce amazing results, provided there is good even lighting on the screen and at least 3 point lighting on the subject. As such it is well-suited to a permanent set-up in a spacious studio. Lastolite’s collapsible backgrounds are great for this. Vivid colours and a wide range of sizes are available, or you can simply paint the background with Chroma paint.

With a reflective chromakey setup, the subject stands in front of a background containing millions of glass micro-beads that reflect light put out from a ring of green (or blue) LEDs mounted around the camera lens. The previously grey screen then becomes green. To the eye, the screen doesn’t appear particularly green; the camera picks up the single frequency light emitted by the LEDs creating a pure green matte background. At close range this can give fantastic results. Predictably, with increased distance the light drop-off means the screen may start looking grey again but, in terms of budget solutions, this method really can’t be beaten.

Backgrounds come in all sizes and, perhaps more importantly, so do the rings – meaning that a ring can fit any lens you care to mount it on and if it doesn’t fit immediately then the supplied adapters will make sure it’s snug. One of the main advantages in this set up is that lighting is only required for the subject. As with a traditional green screen the subject will require the usual key, back and fill lighting, but unlike a traditional set-up the screen itself doesn’t require lighting at all.

With the option to switch between a blue and green light ring, you can easily change the colour used for your chromakey (just in case a guest arrives in the studio wearing a bright green jump suit…). All light rings come with a control box to adjust the level of light emitted, and all that remains is the “tuning” of the keyer into your setup.

For smaller cameras (72mm) the Datavideo CKL-200 kit is good value and produces great results for professional corporate videos or educational projects. It has the added benefit of changing between green and blue at the flick of a switch. However, the keyer only has composite in and out, so isn’t of the highest quality available.

For larger cameras and broadcast standard kit (still at an attainable price) the Reflecmedia kits are not to be sneezed at. With the option of collapsible backgrounds it makes putting up the kit a cinch and taking it down only slightly less so! The light rings come in small (72mm), medium (112mm) and large (147mm) and with the whole gamut of adapters for differing lenses.

The Ultimatte DV keyer supplied with these kits has not only composite in and out, but also DV in and out. Admittedly not at the same time, but with the onboard frame store, it’s possible to import the background required, store it, and then digitally output the keyed video unlocking a whole new level of quality for affordable and reliable chromakey.

With great solutions at low-end prices there’s now no reason to miss out on a chromakey set-up whatever situation you’re in, and for a simplicity on a budget the reflective set-ups are so user friendly it’s pretty hard to go wrong.

Want to know more? Call us on 03332 400 222, email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com or take a look at our full broadcast range.