Get a Sony FS5 or X70 camera with upgrade and save up to £100!

Get a Sony FS5 or X70 camera with upgrade and save up to £100!

Among Sony’s many exciting announcements at NAB 2016, their 4K RAW upgrade for the PXW-FS5 and MPEG HD upgrade on the PXW-X70 (two of our favourite cameras) were probably pick of the bunch. So now we’re bundling the upgrades together with the cameras, meaning you can get up to £100 off when you buy the FS5 or X70 along with the upgrade. Aren’t we good…?

What are these upgrades?

The RAW upgrade on the PXW-FS5 offers 4K RAW up to 60p and a 240fps slow motion in 1080p, allowing greater flexibility in post-production, and making the FS5 ready for just about any production, be that corporate, events, fashion, music videos, drone, rigs, online, you and your dog’s talent show submission tape, or whatever. And the MPEG HD upgrade on the PXW-X70 is perfect for anyone who wants to maintain a consistent workflow with existing broadcast, MPEG HD infrastructure.

Why are they so great?

4K RAW output. RAW is lightly compressed (3:1), 12-bit 444 signal. The firmware also enables true DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) RAW over the standard UHD, at 23.98, 25, 29.97, 50 and 59.94p. This means infinite creative possibilities for grading or correcting in post. It’s based on a well-known RAW system (the same as for NEX-FS700 (SDI & HXR-IFR5)), and internal HD recording is possible during 4K RAW output.

4K and 2K super slowmo. Over-crank and shoot genuine slow motion in RAW – the upgrade gives you infinite creative possibilities in post, in super-slick slow-mo! Shoot 2K (continuously) up to 240fps at 100, 120, 200, 240 fps, and DCI 4K RAW (4096 x 2160) up to 120fps (in a 4 second cache).

MPEG-2 4:2:2 50mbps recording. With this upgraded codec, the X70 becomes a unique palm-sized broadcast camcorder, integrating into the professional broadcast and documentary environment. It optimises your existing workflow for Full HD takes without having to shell out for new editing systems or updates.

Easy to upgrade. There’s no need for a hardware upgrade – you just buy the camera/upgrade bundle from us, and perform a simple firmware update.

It’s just important to remember that, while the firmware enables the RAW output, you do need something to capture that output, and because it’s such a large amount of data, only a few solutions are qualified. Great options include the Atomos Shogun Inferno or Shogun Flame – both are High Dynamic Range (HDR) monitor/recorders, enabling accurate on-set monitoring when shooting in RAW.

Sounds good. Where do I get them?

You can get both the special camera and upgrade bundle deals from Jigsaw24 for a limited time by clicking on the links below (or giving the friendly sales team a tinkle, of course)…

Sony FS5 on Jigsaw24

– Purchase the FS5 with the RAW upgrade at the same time and save £100!

Sony X70 on Jigsaw24

– Purchase the X70 with the MPEG HD upgrade and save £50!

Want to know more about Sony camcorders? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

AJA Releases CION v1.3 Firmware with New Gamma Settings; Announces New Pak1000 Promo

AJA Releases CION v1.3 Firmware with New Gamma Settings; Announces New Pak1000 Promo

AJA Video Systems today released new v1.3 firmware for the AJA CION, AJA’s 4K/UltraHD and 2K/HD production camera that shoots edit-ready Apple ProRes files at up to 4K 60fps.

CION v1.3 firmware, available today as a free software download, was created based on customer feedback, and adds features that improve the CION imagery pipeline. AJA has also announced that CION purchases made after April 18, 2016 will qualify for a complimentary Pak1000 drive (US MSRP $1,495.00) provided directly from AJA.

CION v1.3 firmware new features:

– Improved highlight handling and black detail in every gamma mode.

– New gamma naming conventions make the modes more closely aligned to industry standards.

– New renamed gamma settings are now available in the CION menu and include new options for Standard, Expanded, Video and Cine modes.

“Our new firmware update and promo were created in direct response to community feedback. CION v1.3 offers a more gentle roll off of highlights, and a greater level of detail in the blacks, while the new promo makes the camera even more accessible to shooters looking to capture stunning footage,” said Nick Rashby, President, AJA Video Systems. “We’ve seen great adoption of CION from the commercial and industrial production community and we look forward to getting this update into our customers’ hands.”

Pricing and availability

CION v1.3 firmware is available today as a free download from AJA’s site. CION is available through AJA’s worldwide reseller network at a US MSRP of $4995.00. To redeem a complimentary Pak1000 drive with a CION purchase made through an authorized AJA Reseller, submit a claim directly here. For more information about CION, visit the AJA site.

For more on the latest NAB Show releases, take a look at our roundup post, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Newsflash! JVC unveil GY-HM660 and GY-HM620

Newsflash! JVC unveil GY-HM660 and GY-HM620

This is the news! JVC have just released the industry’s first ever streaming camcorder, the GY-HM660, with an integrated IFB (interruptible foldback) audio channel, perfect for live broadcasts. In other news, they’ve also launched the GY-HM620, which rocks an improved CMOS sensor.

Whether you’re reporting in your wellies from a flood-ravaged coastal town or waiting on the latest big money movement for that Premier League prodigy, the integrated IFB in the GY-HM660 (a free firmware update available in June 2016), along with the live streaming capability, means reporters in the field can communicate directly with the studio through IFB while streaming live HD reports. Real Time Messaging Protocol (RTMP) support means you can even connect directly to YouTube and the like, and it’s compatible with Streamstar’s range of streaming production tools too.

JVC GY-HM660: Perfect for news

Over to you, GY-HM620

Also new in the 600 series camp (the 660 and 620 replace the 650 and 600, respectively) are the sensors. Both the GY-HM660 and the GY-HM620 feature three new 12-bit CMOS sensors with improved F13 (50Hz) sensitivity for better performance in low light. As well as an upgraded 3.5″ LCD display, the integrated Fujinon 23x auto focus zoom lens offers a wide 29-667mm (35mm equivalent) focal range and includes three ND filters as well as manual zoom, focus and iris rings.

Craig Yanagi, Product Marketing Manager at JVC Professional Video, had this to say: “The new 600 Series camcorders are built to deliver the best performance for run-and-gun ENG and EFP shooters. They have all the tools you need in the field – a specially designed Fujinon lens with optical image stabilization, excellent low-light performance, and multiple native recording formats for the industry’s fastest shoot-to-edit workflow.”

– The JVC GY-HM660 will be available in April 2016, and the GY-HM620 is expected to ship in June 2016. We’ll have more as we know it!

Want to know more about JVC cameras? Call us today on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. Alternatively, ‘like’ us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @WeAreJigsaw24.

Sony announce details of upcoming FS7, F5 & F55 firmware

Sony announce details of upcoming FS7, F5 & F55 firmware

Sony have announced that the FS7, F5 and F55 will all be getting firmware updates in January 2016. Although the updates were originally promised slightly sooner, Sony say they’ve been holding them back in order to improve S&Q RAW recording with an external RAW recorder.

The updates – officially titled PXW-FS7 Version 3.0 and PMW-F5/55 Version 7.0 – will be available free of charge “within January 2016″.

Key features of PXW-FS7 Version 3.0 include:

– Support for adjusting the Focus Magnification area position.

– Support for “2K Full”, “2K Center” setting in Image Scan Mode.

– Support for Interval Recording function.

– Support for Noise Suppression setting in Cine EI mode.

– Expand lowest value of Zebra level to 0%.

– RAW image quality improvement at 240/200fps HFR shooting.

Key features of the PMW-F5/55 Version 7.0 include:

– Quick Menu for fast access via Subdisplay (Option Button).

– ITU-R BT.2020 Support in Custom Mode (F55 only).

– MPEG2 50Mbps (50i/ 59.94i) Proxy recording while XAVC 4K/QFHD (50p/59.94p) recording (F5 needs to have the CBKZ-55FX licence installed).

– Simultaneous recording to the same SxS Pro+ card of MPEG2 50Mbps 4:2:2 and 10 bit 4:2:2 4K XAVC in either 3840 x 2160 or 4096 x 2160. The files will have matching Timecode and file naming.

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

4K Shootout: Your guide to the current 4K camera crop

4K Shootout: Your guide to the current 4K camera crop

With our 4K shootout due to mosey into town any day now (well, on 23rd July), we thought it was time to take a closer look at four of the cameras you’ll be able to get hands-on with on the day. Take notes, prepare questions, mentally pick out lenses: anything to ensure you’re not overwhelmed when you get the chance to shoot with all four of them side by side. 

Sony PXW-FS7

First up, the Sony PXW-FS7. As we’ve said before, this Super 35mm 4K handheld takes everything we loved about the FS700, ratchets it up to 11 and then marries it to one of the most ergonomic designs we’ve seen in a long time.

The FS7 is the most flexible workhorse of the bunch, well built enough to function as an excellent ENG and documentary camera. The built-in hand grip serves the dual function of making the camera lighter and easier to balance during long shoots, and means that you don’t have to rig the camera to the extent that you expect in order to get the shots that you want – both big pluses for run and gun shooting.

However, that’s not to discount the quality of images you can get from this camera – it’s capable of shooting beautiful footage, and its support for S-Log3 effectively gives you 1.5 extra stops of dynamic range compared to its predecessor, the FS700, and, as S-Log3 is pretty close to Cineon log, the footage you get is easier to grade and you’ve got more chance of achieving a classic ‘filmic’ look.

Sensor-wise, the PXW-FS7 boasts a Super 35mm CMOS image sensor with 11.6 million pixels in a 4352 x 2662 configuration, including 8.9 million effective pixels. The sensor’s high readout speed means the FS7 can support super slow motion 4K shooting, and its full pixel readout capability and lack of pixel binning mean that jaggies and noir are minimised.

While it’s natively E-mount, an A-mount adaptor is available if you want access to a wider pool of lenses. Plus, Sony are so confident about the quality of their hardware that they’re offering an extended warranty on it, which is always reassuring.

AJA CION

AJA are known for their sturdy, unfussy designs, and the CION follows that pattern exactly: its traditional form factor and lightweight body make it an ergonomic choice for longer shoots. There’s also the usual (but highly practical) fact that it can be stored away while fully rigged, so if you need to shoot with no notice, you can just take it out of its case and go.

Design considerations aside, the CION is able to output 4K raw data at up to 120fps via 4x 3G-SDI outputs (you can shoot directly to edit-ready Apple ProRes 4444 at up to 4K 30fps over Thunderbolt, ProRes 422 at up to 4K 60fps, or output AJA Raw at up to 4K 120fps), and records directly to AJA Pak SSD media at up to 60 frames per second. Its APS-C sized CMOS sensor is backed by great internal processing, meaning your end image is noise-free under most conditions, and it packs in an electronic global shutter and 12 stops of dynamic range.

Given the range of codecs and lens options available to you, the CION is a great choice for anyone who’s looking to achieve a cinematic look under a range of circumstances and workflows. AJA’s hardware is typically built like a tank and rarely goes EOL, so we’re willing to bet the CION will be kept current for a good few years – it’s already had some interesting firmware upgrades – making it a safe investment for anyone who needs their camera to last far longer than it should at its price point.

Blackmagic Design URSA

As we’ve said before, of all this group, the URSA is most suited to multiple operators; you can even split the on-camera controls so that one side of the camera controls audio while the other handles image settings, and can check separate scopes on all three of the URSA’s on-board monitors.

The corollary to this is that the URSA really needs to be rigged on a tripod, being, as it is, one of the heaviest cameras we’ve ever encountered. You’ll also need a good stock of V-lock batteries, as the URSA’s massive internal processing power translates to a constant thirst for power, so grab some batteries and a VTC plate along with the camera body if you’re thinking of buying.

However, it can shoot incredibly flexibly, supports high frame rate and delivers what are team our calling “pretty hardcore” image quality, so if you want 180fps ProRes now, no questions asked, this is the camera to set your sights on.

JVC GY-LS300

Not often mentioned in the same breath as the other three, but we think the LS300 has a lot more to offer than most people assume. First off, this is a Super 35mm 4K camera for under £3K ex VAT, which is extremely good value. And the fact that it supports a wide range of interchangeable lenses means that you can probably save again by reusing your existing still camera lenses to shoot video. Then of course there’s the fact that it shoots 4K Ultra HD, full HD with 4:2:2 sampling, SD and web-friendly proxy files, so you’re not going to need to replace or add to it for some time, meaning you’ll get great ROI.

It also has some very nifty hidden features and, because it has a full frame sensor and lets you scale down the crop factor by percentage, offers you ultimate lens flexibility. If you want to capture a micro 4/3″ or 2/3″ size image, you simply need to scale to the correct size, then carry on shooting as if you were on a smaller sensor camera. And even if you’re attaching the smallest lenses in your collection, you’ll still be able to pull HD images off the camera – in some cases, even 4K.

It also has XLR inputs, so you have plenty of high quality micing options, and will support auto-focus and zoom rocker use on any lenses that have those features enabled, meaning that with the right accessories the LS300 can become a really interesting run and gun camera, perfect for live events and ENG-style shooting – especially given its live streaming and FTP capabilities.

Register for our 4K Shootout

Drop by our Soho office on 23rd July to get hands on with these guys and put your questions to the team – we’ll also have Varicam, DSLRs like the A7S and GH4, the URSA Mini and the XC-10, as well as Zeiss glass, a 4K lighting setup from Cirrolight (and a tutorial on lighting for 4K with cinematographer John Harrison).

Want to know more? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Want to improve your video workflow? Here’s how Sony can help…

Want to improve your video workflow? Here’s how Sony can help…

If you’re shooting video on your DSLR, you’ll have realised you can only shoot in short bursts and have probably encountered the infamous rolling shutter ‘jelly effect’. Know what we’re talking about? This is because DSLRs aren’t optimised for video. So if you’re looking to step up from DSLR to a dedicated video camera, you need to think about your overall design workflow and end goals. Here are a few pointers and ways in which Sony can help.

Sony are one of the industry leaders, so getting to grips with their tech can be a real benefit and open your design workflow up to a whole host of cameras and peripherals to chose from. Here are a few things we recommend you bare in mind when considering your camera selection.

What kind of projects does your business produce?

Those of you that work on film will want a large sensor camera so that you’re able to master shooting with a ‘filmic’ shallow depth of field, whereas if your work is geared more towards general media production, you’ll want a smaller sensor camera that allows for longer focus, so that you can practice reactive shooting as events unfold.

Distinctions like this will also impact your choice of lens – variable if your goal is to create something attractive, fixed if you’re trying to shoot a news segment – and the kind of rigs, tripods and lights you need.

Studio v location shooting

If you’re design workflow focuses more on media and television production, you’re far more likely to need a dedicated room or studio where you can record, carry out chromakeying and man the gallery.

In this is the case, you’ll need cameras that can be linked together in a traditional studio setup. And if you’re using something like NewTek TriCaster to mix or stream footage, that will in turn affect the kinds of inputs and outputs you need on your cameras.

The good news is that most cameras can be modified to fit into a setup like this, but it’s important to make sure you have compatible cameras so that there’s not a noticeable difference between footage from A and B cameras, and that you don’t have to waste valuable time juggling file types and media formats.

What will you be doing with the footage after it’s shot (and how much storage do you have)?

Having a dedicated space for media work and basing your choice of camera around your streaming setup and infrastructure is a far better move than getting yourself cameras that look great but are difficult to network and integrate with the rest of your infrastructure. And of course if you’re going to be shuttling everything back and forth, you’ll want to go for as sturdy a camera as possible – no-one likes an unexpected repair bill.

When it comes to choosing a camera, it’s important to bear in mind that your choice can tie you into a specific workflow. Just because the camera you choose is budget conscious, doesn’t mean the files it records are. If you get a cheap camera that supports a very specific codec and workflow, you may well need to overhaul your storage and change key pieces of software, meaning the final cost will be greater than if you’d opted for a more expensive camera with a more flexible workflow and made use of your existing resources.

Another factor to consider is the sheer size of some files. If part of your daily design workflow includes shooting RAW footage, you need to be aware that you could be filling up a 64GB card every five minutes, so you’ll need a vast amount of (in some cases proprietary and expensive) media at your disposal. If post-production techniques like colour grading aren’t the focus of your business, it’s unlikely you really need to be working with such files at all, and we generally recommend sticking to something that’s kinder to your storage setup unless you’re looking to teach one specific hi-res workflow.

Our recommendations

With all that in mind, here are a few cameras we’d recommend for different workflows ranging from videography, promo films, live streaming and live reporting– if you’d like to find out more about any of them, you can always get in touch with our team at broadcast@Jigsaw24.com.

For corporate videography or advertising…

If you’re looking for a budget camera that still delivers on image quality and really don’t want to leave DSLRs behind, opt for a DSLR like Sony’s A7S. Affordable, equipped with a full frame sensor for shallow depth of field and able to record 4K to an external recorder if that’s what you really need, it’s a great option if you’ll be shooting in less than ideal conditions.

The PXW-FS7 is another strong option. Rammed with pro features and designed to be Sony’s most ergonomic camera to date, it’s ideal for trips out into the wild for more long form projects.

For live streaming from events or product videos…

Most cameras can be modified to fit into a studio setup, and with the latest additions to the TriCaster range you can stream from pretty much any camera with a pro SDI output, so do talk to us if you think you can’t afford studio cameras. That said, this is an area where your end goal can affect your camera choice and, by extension, the infrastructure you base your studio on – putting a low quality camera at the front of a high-end workflow will stop you getting the most out of your investment, and conversely buying expensive cameras without the backend to support them will stop you getting the best possible image quality.

The key thing here is to make sure you’re talking to your supplier about the workflow as a whole, so that you’re getting something that’s particular to the needs of your on design workflow and employees. If you’d like a couple of extreme examples to start you off, the PXW-X70 is increasingly popular as it allows you to adopt a real broadcast-quality workflow on a manageable budget, while the HXC-D70 was designed specifically to bring high-end technology to smaller studio setups, making it the perfect choice for smaller creative agencies. However, you’ll be able to find cameras at virtually every price and feature point between the two, so do ask us for options!

For live reporting from events or event videography…

The PXW-X70 is also a safe bet for the kind of run-and-gun shooting needed for electronic news gathering, while the HXR-MC2500 is an updated version of the MC2000 that gives you a 14 hour recording time to inexpensive media.

If you’re looking for top industry-spec tech, we’d recommend looking at the the EBU-approved PXW-X160 and PXW-X180. As well as letting you record broadcast quality footage, these cameras shoot XAVC, a professional Sony codec that’s widely supported.

To frantically reiterate, we’ve just outlined a few options here, and many cameras can be adapted to the needs of individual businesses and design workflows. To find out more about your options, get in touch with the team on the details below.

Want some advice about updating your setup? Give our consultants a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

 


Jigsaw24 review: Canon C100 MkII

Jigsaw24 review: Canon C100 MkII

Canon were kind enough to bring a C100 MkII into our office last week, and as well as getting all the key specs, our camera specialist James Graham got to put his sticky fingerprints all over it. Here’s what he learned…

Is it a C100 disguised as a C300?

Kind of. The body is slightly larger now, giving the MkII a distinctly C300-ish silhouette, but the overall form factor, ergonomics and handling still feel very much like the C100 we all know and faun over.

And the reason behind that extra width? Canon have changed the MkI’s fixed rear display into a folding, rotating, side-mounted OLED screen, so you can see it far more easily when you’re shooting, and made the view finder far more mobile and comfortable. Essentially, your dominant eye gets to enjoy the luxurious comfort of a C300, while the rest of you operates a C100 in exactly the same way you would the C100 MkI.

It’s still not 4K

As we’ve said before, this is a camera that prioritises image quality over image size. While equipping yourself with a 4K-ready camera does help future-proof your workflow, at the C100’s price point that usually means compromising on image quality. If you’re not working with 4K regularly – and most of the people we talk to aren’t – then seriously consider whether you wouldn’t be better off going with the C100 MkII and getting the best possible image you can while you’re still working in lower resolutions.

And just to be clear – the C100 MkII is going to offer you a visibly better image than its predecessor. While Canon have kept the same sensor, they’ve kitted the C100 MkII out with a brand new DIGIC DV4 processor, which is much cleverer than the C100’s. Pluses we’ve been promised include reduced noise, reduced moire, improved low light performance (the MkII has a max ISO of 102400) and the same debater system as you get with the C500, all of which we are strongly in favour of.

What are the new features?

Dual pixel autofocus. A bit of a lifesaver in run and gun situations, DAF is included as standard on the C100 MkII. It’s faster than your normal focus as it’s not contrast based, but limited to targets within the central 25% of your frame.

Face detection autofocus (selected STM lenses only) Not quite as quick as DAF, but this will identify faces anywhere in your frame and make sure they’re in focus. You can even choose whether it tracks a given face to keep it in focus, or stays focused on a fixed point if the face you’re filming moves or leaves the frame.

AVCHD and MP4 simultaneous recording. Stick two memory cards into your C100 MkII and you can record 28Mbps AVCHD to one and 35Mbps MP4 to the other. Yes please.

Remote control via WiFi (and built-in FTP). Can’t loiter by your camera? You can now control it remotely from any device with a web browser, thanks to Canon’s new remote control interface (there’s also a physical remote, the RC-V100, that will do the same job). One neat feature here is that you can create different user profiles within the control interface, so one operator can have control over every aspect of the C100, while another can be limited to dealing with certain features. There is a slight lag, but it’s well under a second. And once you’ve remotely recorded everything, you can send it back to base using the built-in FTP support.

Clean HDMI out with support for Canon LUT. Whoop.

What comes in the box?

One of three things: a body-only C100 MkII, a C100 MkII with a 18-135mm lens kit that supports DAF and face recognition, or a C100 MkII with a 24 – 105mm lens that supports DAF but wouldn’t know a face if it was pointed right at one. If you want to choose your own glass, the MkII will happily work with EF, EF-S and Cine Prime lenses, but only STM ones can currently support its face recognition system.

What’s the verdict?

Hell yes. Says James, “If you didn’t like the C100, this won’t change your mind – the changes are mostly ergonomic and practical – for example the viewfinder is now something you’d actually want to use, you have more assignable keys and the controls on the side of the camera are raised so they’re easier to find when you’re using the viewfinder. However, if you are looking at buying or updating a C100, definitely choose this model and get that new processor and DAF.

“As well as the flashy stuff there have been some really thoughtful tweaks – I like that you can now change the display to black and white when adjusting focus magnification, so it’s both easier to focus and any idiot can tell you’re not shooting. Everything we loved about the C100 is still there, it’s just better now.”

Want to know more about wireless audio? Call us on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

New firmware updates available for Sony PMW camcorders

New firmware updates available for Sony PMW camcorders

Sony XDCAM camcorder users, here’s a little update just for you. Sony have released a few firmware upgrades for their excellent PMW-300K1, PMW-200 and PMW-EX3 camcorders. And just to top it off, they’re all free of charge too.

Details of the new and improved functionality on offer in the free firmware updates for Sony camcorders, plus the all-important links to where to download them, are below. Enjoy:

New firmware version 1.12 for PMW-300K1

For the PMW-300K1, Sony have now added an ALAC (Auto Lens Aberration Compensation) feature improvement. Compensation in vertical direction is now available in addition to the horizontal direction. Download Sony’s PMW-300K1 v1.12 firmware here.

New firmware version 1.32 for PMW-200

With this latest firmware, the lens aberration compensation function on the Sony PMW-200 is now improved by optimising the standard setting. Download Sony’s PMW-200 v1.32 firmware here.

New firmware version 1.30 for PMW-EX3

The slow zoom function with the lens which is supplied with the PMW-300K1/300K2 has been improved. Compared to the lens which is supplied with the PMW-EX3, the new lenses which are supplied with the PMW-300K1 and 300K2 have been improved electrically and the slower servo zoom is possible. If the PMW-EX3 is used with the new lens, the slow zoom is also possible with this firmware upgrade. Download Sony’s PMW-EX3 v1.30 firmware here.

Sony camcorders

Want to find out more about Sony camcorders? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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JVC announce the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890

JVC announce the  GY-HM850 and GY-HM890


JVC have expanded their GY-HM series with two new cameras: the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890. These will be on show at this year’s BVE, where JVC will be talking you through how they plan to “set a new benchmark in ENG camera network capability”, but in the meantime here’s what you need to know.

The sensor

Both cameras feature three 1/3″ 2.07 effective megapixel CMOS sensors which can capture full 1920×1080 images. According to the official press release, “the imagers provide 12-bit processing, F12 sensitivity (50Hz) and excellent signal-to-noise ratio to produce superior colour reproduction.”

The lens

Again, both cameras boast the same glass, shipping with a 20x autofocus zoom lens provided by Fujinon. Its key features include auto-focus, built-in optical image stabilisation and chromatic aberration correction. It’s a 1/3″ bayonet lens which also includes manual focus and iris rings.

The recording workflow

The GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 record HD and SD as FCP X (.mov), XD CAM EX (.mp4), AS-10 (.mxf), AVCHD (.mts) and H.246 (.mov), meaning it’s compatible with most major NLEs. The official announcement goes on to reassure us that ‘footage can be recorded using MPEG-2 or H.264 compression at a variety of bit rates, frame rates and resolutions.”

Both the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 have dual slots that can record to either SDHC or SDXC cards. A variety of modes are supported, including simultaneous recording to both cards for instant backup and relay recording for continuous shooting, alongside standards like interval recording, variable frame rate recording and a ten second pre-recording cache.

Streaming from the camera

Leading on from the GY-HM650, the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 both feature FTP and GSM connectivity that allows you to stream HD footage directly from the camera. “We believe the future is with the live video streaming and FTP service fully integrated into the camera, as demonstrated with the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890,” explained Gustav Emrich, JVC’s European product manager. “With the recent advancements in GSM availability and bandwidth, service providers can deliver reliable high-speed connections that can support HD streaming with a single modem. This technology is here now, and will continue to progress and improve.”

Because of the GY-HM800 series’ dual codec design, you can now transfer files in the background while recording as normal to your other card. All you need to do is connect your camera to a GSM modem or WiFi adapter via USB, and then transmit your footage in realtime – a massive boon for any ENG crew. UDP, TCP, RTP/RTSP and ZIXI streaming protocols are supported. Advanced Streaming Technology is used to provide content-aware error correction, bandwidth feedback and reliable feedback on your streaming status.

JVC are using a mysterious, proprietary set of algorithms that ensure reliable transmission by maximising bandwidth, and can compensate for up to 30% packet loss.

Controlling your camera with WiFi

In addition to all this fancy live streaming stuff, with the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890, you can also do slightly more prosaic things like control your camera via WiFi from any iOS device, Android device, Mac or PC. You can also edit metadata on any of those devices, including GPS data.

Do you need the GY-HM850 or the GY-HM890?

While both models include genlock and timecode terminals, HD/SDI out, HDMI out, a 3.5mm jack and a four channel audio system with stereo AUX inputs and two XLR mic/line inputs with phantom power. They also have ten assignable buttons and focus assist. But only the GY-HM890 has the kind of pro features that make it ideal for multi-camera studio setups. You can add fibre or multi-core camera modules, and the camera is compatible with a full range of studio components, including studio sled, zoom and focus controls, viewfinders and box-style lenses.

LANC and remote controllers are supported on the GY-HM890, too, along with an HD/SDI pool feed input that can record and stream video and audio from another camera or SDI source during press conferences or other pool feed environments – all of which is a no on the GY-HM850. So if that’s where you’re heading, go for the 890.

Want to know more about JVC’s latest? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.
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Sony November news: PVM-A series, F5/55 accessories and more

Sony November news: PVM-A series, F5/55 accessories and more

Want the latest news on Sony products? You’ve come to the right place, as we round up all November’s biggest headlines from Sony, including the launch of the PVM-A monitor range, new accessories for the F5 and F55 camcorders, and shipping info on the ODS-D77U Optical Disc Archive…

Sony unveil the PVM-A monitor range

To kick off, Sony have announced two new additions to the TRIMASTER EL Professional OLED line – the 25″ PVM-A250 and the 17″ PVM-A170. These new monitors feature all the high accuracy, contrast and picture quality of their predecessors, but in a lightweight, slimmed down form factor. In fact, they’ve had approximately 40% shaved off the depth and weight compared to previous Sony models, which is going to be ideal for live production and OB truck usage.

Sony PVM-A250

“Higher resolution content creation – 4K and beyond – requires monitors with larger screen sizes for accurate colour evaluation on site,” said Daniel Dubreuil, senior product marketing manager, professional monitors, Sony Europe. “But bigger monitors are harder to carry and take up more space. These new models have the screen size needed for critical evaluation, with a thinner and lighter design that’s perfect for live broadcast and outdoor shooting. They even have a handle for easy carrying.”

The PVM-A250 and PVM-A170 also include I/P conversion that delivers automatically optimised signal processing according to input signals, with low latency (less than 0.5 field). They’ll both be available come January 2014, but if you just can’t wait for that, take a look at the current range in our Sony TRIMASTER EL OLED comparison chart.

Introducing new Sony F5/F55 camera accessories

Looking for the perfect addition for your PMW-F5 or PMW-F55 camcorder? Sony have now extended their accessory line-up with tools for 4K Live production, flexible lens adaptors and cable solutions. All in time for Christmas…

The CA-4000 4K Live Fiber Adaptor docks to the back of your F55 to turn it into a 4K Live system camera, with 4K fiber transmission up to 2000m. Other features include support for HDCU-2000/2500 Camera Control Unit operation, high frame rate recording up to 240 frames in 1080p and HD cut-out functionality.

On the lens front, the latest adaptors for the F5 and F55 let you use your favourite glass with the FZ mount, making them flexible enough for everything from news and sport to documentary and run-and-gun filmmaking. The range includes an FZ to PL adaptor with 12-pin connector, a B4 adaptor for use with 2/3 inch lenses, and a remote control version too.

Browse the F5, F55 and Sony’s F-series accessories at Jigsaw24.com.

Sony ODS-D77U

ODS-D77U Optical Disc Archive to ship soon

If you’re after long-term, reliable storage for huge volumes of media assets, look no further than Sony’s new ODS-D77U. The latest in their line-up of next-generation Optical Disc Archive solutions, it brings high speed reading and writing capabilities to the table, being able to achieve a maximum of over 1Gbps – more than twice that of Sony’s ODS-D55U. The ODS-D77U also features a high speed standard USB 3.0 interface for fast and easy connections, and an updated version of its graphical user interface Content Manager 2.0, which supports more formats and features, and has improved metadata operation. The ODS-D77U will be shipping in mid-December.

Shop Sony on Jigsaw24.com

Want to know more about Sony productsGive us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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