NewTek launch TriCaster and 3Play offers ahead of BVE

NewTek launch TriCaster and 3Play offers ahead of BVE

NewTek have announced a pair of massive price drops ahead of this year’s BVE show, knocking two grand off the price of TriCaster and 3Play setups until 31st March 2014. 

An early contender for our offer of the show is this corker from NewTek, who are offering anyone who gets in touch with them or one of their elite partners (i.e. us) during BVE the chance to get a TriCaster 8000 for just £28,000 ex VAT. And not only that, but they’re throwing in extras Virtual Set Editor and LiveText gratis, creating a bundle so compellingly discounted that we’ve chosen to use three exclamation marks in our product description.

If you’re sorted for live streaming, let us turn your attention to the equally discounted 3Play Multi-camera Replay Server, which is also available for £28,000 until 31st March for anyone who talks to us or NewTek during BVE. Key features here include redundant capture, with the 3Play doubling  up on up to four ISO recordings; live replay switching, allowing you to monitor angles and add transitions on the fly; slow motion playback and social media integration, so you can share straight to Facebook, Twitter and other networks.

Not only are these offers limited time, they’re on limited stock, so when our current crop of 3Plays and TriCasters are gone the price will be hiked back up. Get clicking now to avoid disappointment!

Want to know more about TriCaster or 3Play Multi-camera Relay Server? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

How do you build a billion dollar app?

How do you build a billion dollar app?

“Do you have a billion dollar app idea?” our development team are fond of asking people (they’d quite like to build someone a billion dollar app, you see). Often, they’re met with blank faces. Received opinion seems to be that a successful app needs to be overloaded with complicated functionality, that it needs to be incredibly technical or solve some kind of mind-bending problem. In short, people tend to think a billion dollar app is a bit beyond them. 

But let’s look at WhatsApp.

First launched in 2008, WhatsApp is essentially a clever implementation of texting, allowing people with caps on their messaging to communicate for free. It was developed by a team of 32 engineers. Its name is a terrible pun. It is not complicated by any stretch of the imagination, and yet it’s just been bought by Facebook for $19 billion.

So why has WhatsApp been so successful?

It’s simple. We learned to text well before 2008, so getting to grips with the app was incredibly simple. We already knew how do everything it asked us to, which meant there was no learning curve to put off nervous new smartphone owners.

It’s cross platform. WhatsApp’s developers managed to get it on every major platform quickly, meaning that when it started getting great word of mouth reviews, users didn’t have to twiddle their thumbs waiting for it to appear on their platform of choice. They just downloaded it, used it, and told everyone else about it. This has helped the app clock up over 400 million users, with an estimated 1 million signing up every day, and 70% of those users WhatsApp-ing each other on any given day. (For comparison look at BBM, which took several years and a series of highly publicised delays to get onto Android and iOS, and has lost ground as a result.)

It makes life easier. Another obvious reason for WhatsApp’s popularity is that it saves people money. Why shell out for a better phone contract when you can just message people for free? And while you’re at it, why commit the social sin of mass texting when you can simply message a group? It’s a very simple problem, solved simply. And it’s a $19 billion dollar app.

Got an app idea that could change your business? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email AppDevelopment@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

Canon launch 0% interest deal on Cinema cameras and lenses ahead of BVE

Canon launch 0% interest deal on Cinema cameras and lenses ahead of BVE


In case you’ve been distracted by JVC’s latest or Panasonic’s move to Micro P2, allow us to gently redirect your attention to Canon for a second. Following the success of last year’s finance deal, they’re now back with something even bigger, offering 0% interest on a whole swathe of cameras and lenses. 

Canon EOS 700D

What’s the catch?

You have to be a pro user in the UK who’s over the age of 18, and you have to buy one of the Cinema range cameras and/or lenses listed below between February 17th and May 2nd 2014. Other than that, you’re pretty much interest-free and easy.

So what’s included?

Cameras

EOS C500 and EOS C500 PL

EOS C300 and EOS C300 PL

EOS C100

EOS-1D C

EOS-1D X

Lenses

CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L S/SP

CN-E14.5-60mm T2.6 L S/SP

CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L S/SP

CN-E30-300mm T2.95-3.7 L S/SP

CN-E14mm T3.1 L F

CN-E24mm T1.5 L F

CN-E35mm T1.5 L F

CN-E50mm T1.3 L F

CN-E85mm T1.3 L F

CN-E135mm T2.2 L F

You can see our full range of Canon Cinema Primes here, and we’ve also go our own stonking C100 deals, in case you want to buy now but would still like a freebie. And let’s face it, who doesn’t?

To find out more about the latest Canon finance options, call the team on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. To keep up with news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

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Blackmagic Design’s Production Camera 4K ships with new low price

Blackmagic Design’s Production Camera 4K ships with new low price


After what feels like a long, long wait, the Blackmagic Design Production Camera 4K has finally started shipping and, while we don’t usually like surprise announcements, we have to admit we like the new, lower price that Blackmagic Design revealed in their shipping press statement.

Blackmagic Design's Production Camera 4K, available now from Jigsaw24

The Production Camera 4K now costs just £1925 (£2310 inc VAT), and this price applies to both cameras ordered now and cameras ordered earlier in the year, so you should end up paying less for your pre-ordered camera than expected (thankfully we weren’t taking deposits, so we don’t have to sit down and work out how much money back we owe everyone).

“The support from the creative community for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera and Production Camera 4K has been amazing,” said Blackmagic Design CEO Grant Petty, in a typically enthusiastic press release. “As with all of our products, we work hard in production to reduce costs so we can pass along the savings, even to our first Blackmagic Production Camera 4K customers. The Blackmagic Production Camera 4K is a perfect companion for ATEM Production 4K switchers and we hope the new low price will help more customers to expand their Ultra HD live production set ups with even more camera angles!”

The camera was already a hit with our team – Ultra HD recording, a simple ProRes workflow, a Super 35mm sensor and a free copy of Resolve are apparently exactly what it takes to win us over – but who says no to a saving?

Buy now from Jigsaw24

Want to know more about the Blackmagic Design Production Camera 4K? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

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Streamlining multisite working with Mac & iOS at NorthEdge

Streamlining multisite working with Mac & iOS at NorthEdge

NorthEdge use Apple’s Mac and iOS devices to ensure all their staff can access key applications, files and systems – no matter which site they’re on, or even if they’re on the move. See how they’re getting on in the video below…

Want to know more about Apple in business? Find out more about the Apple ecosystem and uses of Mac and iPad in business at our Apple in business site. Or if you have any questions, give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email B2B@Jigsaw24.com.


Panasonic release AJ-PX270 ahead of BVE

Panasonic release AJ-PX270 ahead of BVE


Not to be outdone by JVC’s launch of their new GY-HM800 series, Panasonic have launched a new camera of their own ahead of BVE 2014. The AJ-PX270 introduces Micro P2 to Panasonic’s lineup, which will be smaller and lighter than a P2 card but just as reliable.

The AJ-PX270 records high quality 10-bit 4:2:2 at 100, 50 or 25 Mbps, supporting both AVC-Intra 100/150 and AVC-LongG50/25, and comes with a lightweight 22x zoom 28mm – 616mm lens. Here’s the official statement:

“The AJ-PX270 is the first P2 HD handheld camera recorder with AVC-ULTRA recording and built-in microP2 card slots. In addition to the established AVC-Intra100, it has AVC-LongG for extended recording and AVC-Intra200 for master level recording. AVC-LongG25 enables extended 1920 x 1080 10 bit 4:2:2 broadcast-quality recording (four times longer than AVC-Intra100). A newly designed, built-in, compact 22x zoom lens covers a wide range from 28 mm to 616 mm. Three lens rings (Cam-Type Zoom, Focus, Iris) provide comfortable manual control similar to interchangeable lenses. The newly developed high-sensitivity and low-noise 1/3 type 3MOS sensors produce superb image, even in dim light.

“Two microP2 card slots enable the ultimate cost-effective operation. The microP2 card, with the same reliability of the P2 card, can be used without an adapter. Simultaneous recording is also possible for backup use. A wireless LAN dongle is available (a 3G/4G/LTE dongle is scheduled for use in the near future). These network functions make workflows more efficient. For example, low-bit-rate proxy and metadata are quickly and easily transmitted.”

Find out more and see the full spec sheet here.

Want to know more about Panasonic’s latest? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.By

JVC announce the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890

JVC announce the  GY-HM850 and GY-HM890


JVC have expanded their GY-HM series with two new cameras: the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890. These will be on show at this year’s BVE, where JVC will be talking you through how they plan to “set a new benchmark in ENG camera network capability”, but in the meantime here’s what you need to know.

The sensor

Both cameras feature three 1/3″ 2.07 effective megapixel CMOS sensors which can capture full 1920×1080 images. According to the official press release, “the imagers provide 12-bit processing, F12 sensitivity (50Hz) and excellent signal-to-noise ratio to produce superior colour reproduction.”

The lens

Again, both cameras boast the same glass, shipping with a 20x autofocus zoom lens provided by Fujinon. Its key features include auto-focus, built-in optical image stabilisation and chromatic aberration correction. It’s a 1/3″ bayonet lens which also includes manual focus and iris rings.

The recording workflow

The GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 record HD and SD as FCP X (.mov), XD CAM EX (.mp4), AS-10 (.mxf), AVCHD (.mts) and H.246 (.mov), meaning it’s compatible with most major NLEs. The official announcement goes on to reassure us that ‘footage can be recorded using MPEG-2 or H.264 compression at a variety of bit rates, frame rates and resolutions.”

Both the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 have dual slots that can record to either SDHC or SDXC cards. A variety of modes are supported, including simultaneous recording to both cards for instant backup and relay recording for continuous shooting, alongside standards like interval recording, variable frame rate recording and a ten second pre-recording cache.

Streaming from the camera

Leading on from the GY-HM650, the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890 both feature FTP and GSM connectivity that allows you to stream HD footage directly from the camera. “We believe the future is with the live video streaming and FTP service fully integrated into the camera, as demonstrated with the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890,” explained Gustav Emrich, JVC’s European product manager. “With the recent advancements in GSM availability and bandwidth, service providers can deliver reliable high-speed connections that can support HD streaming with a single modem. This technology is here now, and will continue to progress and improve.”

Because of the GY-HM800 series’ dual codec design, you can now transfer files in the background while recording as normal to your other card. All you need to do is connect your camera to a GSM modem or WiFi adapter via USB, and then transmit your footage in realtime – a massive boon for any ENG crew. UDP, TCP, RTP/RTSP and ZIXI streaming protocols are supported. Advanced Streaming Technology is used to provide content-aware error correction, bandwidth feedback and reliable feedback on your streaming status.

JVC are using a mysterious, proprietary set of algorithms that ensure reliable transmission by maximising bandwidth, and can compensate for up to 30% packet loss.

Controlling your camera with WiFi

In addition to all this fancy live streaming stuff, with the GY-HM850 and GY-HM890, you can also do slightly more prosaic things like control your camera via WiFi from any iOS device, Android device, Mac or PC. You can also edit metadata on any of those devices, including GPS data.

Do you need the GY-HM850 or the GY-HM890?

While both models include genlock and timecode terminals, HD/SDI out, HDMI out, a 3.5mm jack and a four channel audio system with stereo AUX inputs and two XLR mic/line inputs with phantom power. They also have ten assignable buttons and focus assist. But only the GY-HM890 has the kind of pro features that make it ideal for multi-camera studio setups. You can add fibre or multi-core camera modules, and the camera is compatible with a full range of studio components, including studio sled, zoom and focus controls, viewfinders and box-style lenses.

LANC and remote controllers are supported on the GY-HM890, too, along with an HD/SDI pool feed input that can record and stream video and audio from another camera or SDI source during press conferences or other pool feed environments – all of which is a no on the GY-HM850. So if that’s where you’re heading, go for the 890.

Want to know more about JVC’s latest? Give us a call on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.
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Lucas Gilman talks Thunderbolt storage, Mac Pro and the G-Technology ev

Lucas Gilman talks Thunderbolt storage, Mac Pro and the G-Technology ev

Photographer and videographer Lucas Gilman has built a reputation on getting fantastic action shots in some of the most trying conditions imaginable, so he’s perfect if you’re looking for someone to stress test your latest kit. Recently, he’s been putting both G-Technology’s Evolution Series and Apple’s new Mac Pro through its paces, so we caught up with him to find out how they fared…

We hear you’ve been taking the new G-Technology ev series out on shoots recently. How does it fit into your workflow?

I shoot a lot of stuff on location around the world, and originally I was using the G-Technology G-RAID minis in the field. However, with the advent of the ev series, it’s made things a lot smoother in terms of going out and capturing both stills and motion. A lot of organisation needs to be done in the field to jump-start the editing process when I’m back in the studio.

I primarily capture in the field, so the first order of business after a day of shooting is to download everything to a backup drive instantaneously. I use a G-DOCK ev with Thunderbolt via a 15” MacBook Pro with Retina display. So I’m harnessing the speed of Thunderbolt, and I’m able to duplicate that data using Shotput Pro for the video things or Photo Mechanic on stills.

That means that right away I’ve got two backup copies. With video, we go to four drafts simultaneously using two G-DOCKs with two G-DRIVE evs in each. On top of that, I’ve got my master copy, which is on the CF or SD card. Those are then geographically separated, and it’s not until then that I’ll begin to go through and start organising data.

The great thing is that once I get back to the studio office, or the mothership, I can plug these G-DRIVE evs right into the G-DOCK that I’ve got on my desk and start ingesting all of that data.

Is that the storage you’d work off for the rest of the project?

Basically, G-SPEEDs are my backup drives, and then for any video work I’m typically using G-RAIDs. Any live work is going on G-RAIDs for video, live work and / or archive is going onto G-SPEEDs.

Basically every day of a shoot I have a set of G-DRIVE ev’s for that given day. So if it’s a ten-day shoot, that means I have twenty G-DRIVE ev’s. If I’m shooting video, I’d have forty G-DRIVE ev’s. And when we get back, all those drives get plugged into G-DOCKs next to my Mac Pro, and all that data starts getting downloaded into the various G-SPEEDs or G-RAIDs. For instance, my photo workflow for my live work, the images that I’m actually working on, and my archive, I use

G-SPEED Q USB 3.0 drives, because that’s totally sufficient for my photo needs. The backup and archive of all the video projects is done via a Thunderbolt RAID Expansion adapter with two G-SPEED eS PROs, which are really fast, and for the daily work I’m using the G-RAIDs. They’re tough, they’re fast, they’re Thunderbolt, they’re all that great stuff.

Why did you gravitate to that particular setup?

It’s easier to be doing all this data backup in the field with the G-DOCK because now I don’t have to manually do it drive-to-drive, or have a bunch of drives plugged in, which is near impossible when you’re on location. I can use G-DRIVEs and the G-DOCK in a JBOD [‘just a bunch of disks’, ie non-RAID] configuration so that they all just show up as independent drives [and only have to do the transfer once]. It makes it so there’s no human error. Because there’s only one copy. It’s easy to stay organised because there’s less to track.

And how are the drives holding up so far?

As far as the speed goes, the G-DRIVE ev’s are definitely sufficient to get the workflow done. I know that there will be speed improvements in the pipeline, because with G-Technology, everything gets faster and bigger every year, so I’m definitely looking forward to that as well as some incorporation of SSD in there at some point.

How important is storage to your workflow?

For me personally, a lot of the things I shoot will never happen again. For instance, I shoot a lot of big water drops and big wave surfing – things that you can’t recreate. So if you screw up and lose a card from that day’s shoot or it falls out of your pocket or whatever, it’s gone forever. So it’s really important for me to have a backup strategy.

Why should people be investing in the best storage they can?

I basically use and trust G-Technology because in my opinion they make the most well built and – consistently – the fastest drives that cater to creative professionals. On top of that, they’re using enterprise class drives in a lot of their products.  For me it all comes down to trust, reliability and speed. Think about it – if I go to Iceland for Land Rover, that’s thousands of dollars we’re spending onsite, the campaign took years to come together, so I spend a little extra on hard drives that I can trust with my creative vision.”

I’ve seen some shots you took of people surfing in pretty glacial waters. I imagine it’s hard to find tech that’ll keep working consistently in arctic conditions.

Exactly. The reason I gravitated to the G-Technology products was that they were built to a higher standard. And that allows me, as a creative professional; to focus on the task at hand and not be worrying about if a drive’s ready to go. That’s just wasted time and energy, when I could be focusing on the project and producing good, relevant content for my clients.

How does this generation of models compare to the ones you were using previously?

As far as the speed, they’re obviously faster, but the form factor is the beauty of it. The fact that I can plug a G-DRIVE ev into my Mac via USB 3 if I want, independently, or I can use them in the G-DOCK and leverage its Thunderbolt speed. In the field I use them via USB, then plug them right into the G-DOCK once I get home. The nice thing is that I don’t have to have a bunch of cords hanging off my desk and a bunch of drives – I don’t have to worry and think ‘oh, did I do that drive yet or not?’ It’s really simple and makes everything really fluid.

Is desktop storage key to your workflow, or do you find yourself working with SAN/nearline/archive setups too? If so, how does your G-Technology storage integrate with that?

I look at the G-DOCK as an ingest mechanism. So you’ve got the data already organised on these cartridges (G-DRIVE evs), and then just ingesting it into your nearline system, like G-RAID or my SAN’s G-SPEED eS PROs, it’s really very simple – basically plug and play. It’s just another method of getting the data from point A to point B, and it’s really fast.

And how have you found using it with Mac Pro?

The benefit of integrating the Mac Pro and the G-Technology system is that the Mac Pro, having six Thunderbolt 2 ports, allows me to attach a lot of peripherals and gives me a lot of flexibility.

But I think the benefit of the Mac Pro is that it is pretty much the fastest computer on the planet. It’s super reliable. It’s very expandable from a peripheral standpoint, and that’s great because G-Technology have made a very concerted effort to move forward with Thunderbolt.

Having that really fast Mac Pro, having Thunderbolt-ready drives, or being able to use Thunderbolt devices such as an ATTO Thunderstream so that I can run SANs, really allows me to configure the system how I want.

I think that’s going to be the big key point for creative professionals, especially in the motion and video market. They’re not pigeonholed into a particular workflow. If they want to run SANs, they can. If they want to run eSATA they can. If you want to use third party cards that will attach via Thunderbolt, you can do that too.  You’re really able to keep that system growing and future-proof it, in a sense.

How have you found working on Mac Pro? Does it live up to the hype?

For me it’s the fastest computer I’ve ever used. Previously, because I do like Thunderbolt, I was using the fastest possible iMac – everything was completely maxed out – and the Mac Pro is way, way faster than that. It allows me to render a lot of data very quickly, and seamlessly scrub through a lot of HD footage. I’m doing my edits a lot quicker. And the fact that I’ve got dual 6GB graphics cards as well as eight core processors – it’s kind of amazing.

Is this going to let you tackle bigger and better projects?

Totally. As of recently, I’ve been shooting pretty much 1080p, but I would definitely think about shooting 4K now, because I could actually do something with it as opposed to it just being a massive chore. That’ll really allow me a lot more flexibility in post whether I’m cropping or moving within the frames or even just shooting super-slow motion stuff. Being able to crunch through all that data now will open up the opportunities for me to be more creative.

What applications have you been using on the new Mac Pro?

I like FCP X. Aperture is my main photo editing app with a little Photoshop thrown in – a sprinkling of Photoshop, I guess you’d say. Typically I feel like the Apple applications are really optimised for this machine, so it’s able to give a much higher level of performance than anybody else can offer.

What performance gains have you seen on the new Mac Pro vs the previous generation?

I had an older generation Mac Pro and then I upgraded everything to iMac because I wanted Thunderbolt. So I had the most current iMac with the fastest processors, maxed out with RAM as well as dual graphics cards and an internal SSD, so it was the fastest you could purchase. I’d say this is eight to ten times faster than my iMac was. Graphics-intensive things like rendering video and such, you just don’t register those things having to render anymore.

What kind of transfer speeds have you seen through Thunderbolt 2?

I have not clocked anything recently. I’m not a speeds and feeds guy. I don’t get too deeply into the tech. But what I do notice is when I’m on a job and I’m not waiting for anything to happen, whether it’s transferring data or rendering – when I’m able to do that really quickly and it feels like wow, that took no time. I don’t even notice it happening because there’s no slowdown, that’s what makes or breaks it for me.

We hear you’ve also been using a Sharp 4K display – can you tell us a little about how you’ve found that?

It’s been great. The only issue I had was that I had to reconfigure all my mouse settings because there’s so much real estate. You literally move your mouse across your desk and it would move a quarter each on my screen. I thought, ‘what is this? Is this a glitch? Oh no, there are a lot more pixels here, and there’s a lot more real estate!’

It’s really taking photo editing to the next level because you just notice more things, it’s just that much more apparent. As far as the video editing goes, having that amount of real estate is great, but it’s also really being able to dig into that footage and notice the nuances and being able to colour grade things on a much higher level really makes things a lot more pleasant. The Sharp display is absolutely amazing.

Want to know more about G-Technology’s latest and the new Mac Pro? Give our team a call on 03332 409 306 or email MacPro@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news, follow @WeAreJigsaw24 on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

 

Meet Sony’s new A team: PVM-A170 and PVM-A250

Meet Sony’s new A team: PVM-A170 and PVM-A250

 

It’s official – Sony have replaced their PVM-2541A and PVM-1741A monitors with the new PVM-A170 and PVM-A250. 

As well as being easier to spell, the A170 and A250 are 40% thinner and lighter than previous generations of PVM monitor, and boast the industry’s best viewing angle – a whopping 89 degrees.
The Sony PVM-A170

Sony's PVM-A170

The smaller of the two monitors, the 17″ PVM-A170 weighs just 4.2 kilos and is far slimmer than its predecessor, so while we don’t recommend that you carry it about, you could do if you needed to. Sony have been quick to point out that their new slimline design is perfect for on-set setups where space is at a premium, or for large ‘monitor wall’ configurations. If you’re worried about carrying it round, you can buy a protection kit that includes AR-coated protection glass and corner bumpers.

It’s got two 3G-SDI I/O ports, one HDMI port and a composite connection, and waveforms, vector scopes and audio level metres are all present and correct – you can even zoom from 0 to 20 IRE – all which supports Sony’s point that this is ideal for on-set monitoring. There are plenty of other useful features too, with colour edges to help camera focus operation, time code display, safety area markers, serial and parallel remote and an eight channel level meter display.

Sony's PVM-A170
The Sony PVM-A250

Sony's PVM-A250

The larger of the two monitors, the Sony PVM-A250 still manages to be 40% lighter and slimmer than its predecessor, weighing in at just 6.1 kilos. As with its counterpart, there is the option to add AR toughened glass and corner protection to keep your PVM-A250 in one piece. Those charming feet you see in the picture fold if you want to mount your PAM-V250, and there’s also a handle if you want to move it between locations, or use it for some impromptu weightlifting.

The PVM-A250 boasts all the scopes, waveform monitors, focus features and meters that the smaller model does, and continues to use Sony’s OLED and TrimasterEL technology to deliver high colour accuracy and consistency at a far lower price point than its competitors. There’s support for multiple input formats, including 480i, 720p, 1080i, and 1080p at frame rates between 23.98 and 60 fps.

Want to know more about Sony’s new PVM-A range? Give us a call on 03332 400 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook

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Blackmagic Design announces DaVinci Resolve 10.1

Blackmagic Design announces DaVinci Resolve 10.1

Having just unboxed our first Mac Pro (video coming soon) we’re itching to load up some software and put it through its paces. How fortunate, then, that Blackmagic Design have chosen today to release DaVinci Resolve 10.1.

DaVinci Resolve 10.1 is available for download now

This iteration includes improved OpenCL support in light of the new Mac Pro and sees the return of 3D support, which has been missing from DaVinci Resolve v10 thus far. Another feature that’s caught our eye is the new Rich Text title support, allowing you to edit the size, font, colour and position of text directly from the timeline.

We’ll have a video showing how DaVinci Resolve 10.1 performs on Mac Pro soon, but in the meantime here’s the official BMD statement:

Blackmagic Design today announced the release of DaVinci Resolve 10.1 software, which adds new editing and 3D stereoscopic features as well as support for Final Cut Pro X 10.1. DaVinci Resolve 10.1 is available now for download free of charge for all existing DaVinci Resolve customers from the Blackmagic Design website.

The new DaVinci Resolve 10.1 update adds innovative editing features that include: allowing users to preview and align multiple camera takes while editing, so they can quickly switch between takes to show their clients shot options live from the timeline. Editors can now copy individual clips in the editing timeline with a simple drag and drop, making it easier to use the same footage in different parts of the edit.

The enhanced editing tools also include support for trimming frame based clips such as DNG and DPX that reduces time in transferring clips for even faster workflows, as well as Rich Text title support which allows every character’s size, position and color to be adjusted individually directly from the Edit page.

Also featured in DaVinci Resolve 10.1 are XML import enhancements for both FCP X 10.1 and FCP 7 customers. Compound clips from FCP X 10.1 with separate A/V elements are now split into individual clips and imported FCP 7 XMLs include font properties and timeline markers as well as being able to bring across sizing, cropping and composition parameters. Now shot reframing adjustments made during Final Cut Pro editing will translate even more accurately into the DaVinci Resolve timeline.

Customers with the full software license of DaVinci Resolve will get enhanced 3D stereoscopic tools including a full stereoscopic multi-track editing timeline, enhanced convergence adjustments and automatic alignment.

“We are really excited to be adding even more advanced editing features so quickly after the release of DaVinci Resolve 10,” said Grant Petty, CEO, Blackmagic Design. “Resolve 10 has been a massive update, with over 50 new features including temporal processing, Open FX plug-ins and powerful on-set tools. The additional editing tools we are releasing today give customers more precise control over their projects from within the DaVinci Resolve timeline and improves integration with popular editing and visual effects software so that customers get the best workflow possible.”

You can download DaVinci Resolve 10.1 from the support page of the Blackmagic Design site.

Want to know more about Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve? Head over to our site, call the team on 03332 409 306 or email broadcast@Jigsaw24.com. For all the latest news and reviews, follow @Jigsaw24Video on Twitter or ‘Like’ us on Facebook